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-   -   Case Mod Project PC-70 (Mocha70) update 12/6/2010 (http://forums.bit-tech.net/showthread.php?t=180243)

Burnout21 21st Dec 2009 14:50

Project PC-70 (Mocha70) update 12/6/2010
 
ho-ho-ho tis the season for the modding tra-la-la-la-lar-la-la-lar. LOL!

Ok last Thursday i picking up the new home for my machine in spec'd in the sig. Ever since moving my GTX280 onto watercooling my ears love me, however the 120.1 rad down front, is on its limits of keeping the system cool, luckily the weather is keeping the ambient temps low.

So I present to you the future project and home.

http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.p...pictureid=7237

yes the mighty PC-70, might be old but she has the space!

Colouring it in, felt tips at the ready! lol!



Yes its brown, but really subtle and elegant for my office.

hopefully something like this

http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.p...pictureid=7313

Plan so far is to slap a 120.3 up top, and remove the front dual 80mm fan mounts for a single 120mm fan+rad or a single 140mm fan possibly. I did have a look at mounting a 120.2 up front but its 10mm to tight for the fitment with out modding the optical drive cage which i would rather not do.

rules keep her stock as possible, but refine her to my taste.



I welcome feedback and idea's, in the mean time i best get the case modelled up in solidworks.

Nanosec 21st Dec 2009 15:44

Sounds like you have a decent plan made up, with all those external bays it should be easy enough to make room for the 120.2 up front. Or replace the bay covers and put in 2 120.1's in series one below the cage and one built into the bottom of the cage. Either way I watch with interest.

Burnout21 21st Dec 2009 22:03

Oh forgot to mention, i shall try and machine some mosfet blocks as they cost 23 from Ek for just 1 block and i need 2, plus a northbridge block.

So call me cheap, im gonna make them!

http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.p...pictureid=7320

http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.p...pictureid=7321

going to work on a northbridge in a minute.

Shadow703793 22nd Dec 2009 19:25

Imo, unless doing some really insane OCing, there is no need for RAM, NB/SB, MOSFET blocks. Unless of course, you are just going for looks ;)

Burnout21 22nd Dec 2009 19:33

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadow703793 (Post 2180019)
Imo, unless doing some really insane OCing, there is no need for RAM, NB/SB, MOSFET blocks. Unless of course, you are just going for looks ;)

I never mentioned Ram cooling.

The mosfet cooling at the moment is pretty piss poor, and the northbridge when running a FSB at 333mhz runs at 65 degree's. This could be due to DFI using there trade mark piss poor bubble gum TIM under the NB, which i will check in the new year.

My board

http://www.hydro-powered.co.uk/catal...00x497%291.jpg


Trust me, i know what i am doing.

stonedsurd 23rd Dec 2009 09:33

I have the same board and yes, the northbridge gets rather toasty.

I don't mind, I'm sticking with the cheapest solution till I can afford those nice Enzotech forged copper heatsinks :D

Burnout21 23rd Dec 2009 13:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by stonedsurd (Post 2180408)
I have the same board and yes, the northbridge gets rather toasty.

I don't mind, I'm sticking with the cheapest solution till I can afford those nice Enzotech forged copper heatsinks :D

I would do the same, but in order to reduce the system noise, i have kept airflow to a minimum and only have it where its needed.

So moving the mosfets and NB on to water is really the only happy option for me. Although i bet the temps are high due to the bubble gum TIM! lol!

Shadow703793 24th Dec 2009 17:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Burnout21 (Post 2180027)
I never mentioned Ram cooling.

The mosfet cooling at the moment is pretty piss poor, and the northbridge when running a FSB at 333mhz runs at 65 degree's. This could be due to DFI using there trade mark piss poor bubble gum TIM under the NB, which i will check in the new year.

Trust me, i know what i am doing.

Ahhh... didn't know you were cooling a Lanparty. DFI makes some good boards in terms of BIOS options (pretty good under LN2/DIce :D ), but yeah, I know what you mean.

Anyways, good luck with it. Just remember: surface area at the base is key on a waterblock.


PS: You can see my first DIY CPU block here: http://www.overclockers.com/forums/s...d.php?t=615621
Currently working on rev 2 waterblock :D

Burnout21 24th Dec 2009 18:46

I've been building blocks since 2006

My first

http://img73.imageshack.us/img73/4148/block0xi.th.jpg

http://forums.bit-tech.net/picture.p...pictureid=1837

I would post up other pictures but there on my server at my student home atm.

Say, i am an old hand at all this chap!

Also like to note that as long as the waterblock can cover what needs to be covered, then its only the internal surface area required. If the flow rate is low, then a large cavity inside the block is necessary to transfer the heat energy. Higher flow rates allow the reduction of internal volume, as the water molecules don't need very long to absorb the heat energy in the reduced volume of the block.

I shall gladly back this up with my degree in design which includes hydraulic design.

andrew8200m 24th Dec 2009 18:53

This is going to look rather good I think bud! Glad the case is to your liking mate, the reset button is on its way however I wouldgive it a week or more due to xmas post.

Stripping mine back to the basics soon for a powdercoat on the inside and if all is well a nice spot of annodising on the outside.

I shall watch this with great interest.

Andy

Burnout21 24th Dec 2009 18:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew8200m (Post 2181551)
This is going to look rather good I think bud! Glad the case is to your liking mate, the reset button is on its way however I wouldgive it a week or more due to xmas post.

Stripping mine back to the basics soon for a powdercoat on the inside and if all is well a nice spot of annodising on the outside.

I shall watch this with great interest.

Andy

Awesome news, PM me where your going to get yours powder coated at, I am still looking around, and we might be able to reduce the cost a little. I was thinking to get my internals done in satin black, so if yours would be the same then a small reduction on cost....

andrew8200m 24th Dec 2009 19:04

Aye it would be the same. I will be getting it all sent to a chap called Tom at chilledpc. He does a great job I must say! Some very nice colours a mods over there if you have a look. Its also worth giving him a call for quotes etc as you can sometimes get a slight reduction in costs if you have a word with him over the phone.

Andy

Burnout21 24th Dec 2009 19:20

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew8200m (Post 2181561)
Aye it would be the same. I will be getting it all sent to a chap called Tom at chilledpc. He does a great job I must say! Some very nice colours a mods over there if you have a look. Its also worth giving him a call for quotes etc as you can sometimes get a slight reduction in costs if you have a word with him over the phone.

Andy

On his site, the prices seem a little high. Might just contact him as i just want the powder coat, no assembly or anything which i could see adding to the cost.

Of course the price listed must be an average cost to have it stripped, coated and rebuilt which involves a lot of labour hence the price.

andrew8200m 24th Dec 2009 19:22

Precisely. If you drill the rivets and pack it to him in bits then its going to be cheaper. On another note, he can powder coat the pc70 as a single unit which brings the cost down. Failing all of the theres a place in long eaton near you that powdercoats as i took some split rims there. It may be worth looking them up and giving them a quick call.

Andy

Burnout21 24th Dec 2009 19:31

Quote:

Originally Posted by andrew8200m (Post 2181571)
Precisely. If you drill the rivets and pack it to him in bits then its going to be cheaper. On another note, he can powder coat the pc70 as a single unit which brings the cost down. Failing all of the theres a place in long eaton near you that powdercoats as i took some split rims there. It may be worth looking them up and giving them a quick call.

Andy

awesome!

Cheapskate 24th Dec 2009 22:42

I like that reservoir.:D What color of delrin did you get?
A metal base+brown=bronze. It should look fantastic.

Burnout21 24th Dec 2009 23:12

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cheapskate (Post 2181687)
I like that reservoir.:D What color of delrin did you get?
A metal base+brown=bronze. It should look fantastic.

Thank god you've seen what the colour would be! lol! every time i've explain this people have said 'brown? what s**t coloured' lol! But i want a chocolatey look to it as well

Black delrin all the way chap, the only striking thing i want is the exterior of the case.

Quick googling around i came across this dub thread, look at the colour of it!

http://www.62bug.net/images/progress...ME/goodbye.jpg

I cant explain the colour at all

Shadow703793 25th Dec 2009 23:04

Quote:

. Higher flow rates allow the reduction of internal volume, as the water molecules don't need very long to absorb the heat energy in the reduced volume of the block
Yup. That agrees whith what I have observed via CFD sims.

Btw, just curious, do you run any CFD sims on your blocks before building?

PS: Sorry for hijacking the thread ;)

Burnout21 26th Dec 2009 22:44

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shadow703793 (Post 2182123)
Yup. That agrees whith what I have observed via CFD sims.

Btw, just curious, do you run any CFD sims on your blocks before building?

PS: Sorry for hijacking the thread ;)

There is no such thing as thread hi-jacking with such questions my friend. Before setting out and designing the block I have to specify my pump and bore of tubing.

From this I know my pressure and flow rate, which allows for the end design of my block. What I haven't done yet is to specify a pump for this project, but the design of the mosfet block can be tweaked to increase its height or decrease to suit the ideal volume desired.

Now this is where your question comes in, 'Do I run fluid dynamics?'

Answer is yes, because I block to create internal turbulence without slowing the flow to much. By tweaking the central feature I can slow or speed up the flow. I use 'Flow Simulation' with in solidworks as it gives me a rough idea as to what is going on. Remember it only has to be a rough idea as the tolerance of the complete loop isn't that precise, if you think every radiator and pump isn't spec sheet perfect not at the price's we pay at at least. At the very least i expect a 10% error margin.

Nothing is perfect, but dam I am going to try!

Burnout21 8th Jan 2010 22:41

Ordered a nice XSPC RS360 today, with grill and fans, hehe shall start modding upon arrival.

powdercoat is going to cost a bomb, so external colour will be automotive paint, something like this

http://autoanything.files.wordpress....int-jobs-5.jpg


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