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A tale of Three Heatsinks

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Tim S, 5 May 2005.

  1. Tim S

    Tim S OG

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  2. TMM

    TMM Modder

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    The gigabyte one screams "thermalright SI-97", but bigger and better :p. Has the performance to match too :rock:
     
  3. Saist

    Saist New Member

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    yeah... the Gigabyte reminds me a lot of some thermaltakes I have...

    anyways, I'm not exactly surprised Coolermaster did such a hot job...

    pun intended.
     
  4. MrWillyWonka

    MrWillyWonka Chocolate computers galore!

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    Good review, I'm looking for a good and powerful HSF for my new Athlon 64 and I think I'm gonna get the G-Power instead of having the stock cooler. So when is this going to be released?
     
  5. m0ng0lh0rde

    m0ng0lh0rde New Member

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    Geez....

    If heatsinks get much larger, you're going to need a plate to attach to the back of the case to keep the things from cracking your motherboard!!

    A 1Kg heatsink? That's crazy!


    Now for another thought. Looking at the Gigabyte cooler, I noticed the heatsink fins didn't make contact with the CPU pad. My thought was, why not make a heatsink in which the fins do go all the way down, *and* you have heat-pipes to transfer some of the temp higher up the fins? Presumably, as you move further away from the heatsink, the temp of the fins gets lower. However, I am not a physicist, heatsink designer, engineer, etc, so I may be way off base on this, and it just plain wouldn't work, or would actually work worse than one way or the other.
     
  6. Cheese

    Cheese Doc

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    If the heatpipes work well, I.E. they transfer heat from the base to the fins significantly better than a continuous copper/aluminium contact would, then there's no need for the contact. Actually the space is to increase airflow through the fins, it reduces the resistance felt by the fan, helps with airflow and probably reduces turbulance and helps with noise - the cooler works very well, I think Gigabyte have done their homework.

    Cheers,

    Rob.
     
  7. Highland3r

    Highland3r New Member

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    Were the tests carried out the the Neo2(NF3) board? From the layout I'm guessing this is the case...

    Good review, coolers are getting insane these days, goes to show though, extra weight doesnt always mean the best cooling....
     
  8. TMM

    TMM Modder

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    Looks like an MSI K8N Neo (skt754) to me.
     
    Last edited: 10 May 2005
  9. Cheese

    Cheese Doc

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    Yep, as it says in the review on page 4 :)
     
  10. Da Dego

    Da Dego Brett Thomas

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    Directly attaching the fins to the cpu base would actually be very counterproductive. Doing so would cause the heat to dissipate back down the fins and onto the sink again, where you don't want it to sit.

    There is actually a (I believe thermaltake) heatpipe out that has this, and it raises the temperature considerably. Essentially all you have then is an HSF assembly with some funny pipes on it to make it look cool.
     
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