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Hardware Aerocool Dead Silence Cube Review

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Meanmotion, 30 Dec 2013.

  1. Meanmotion

    Meanmotion bleh Moderator

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  2. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Seems strange to review a case designed to be quiet without some measurement of how silent it is, other than saying it keeps noise levels low.
    I know it can be hard to measure noise levels, but with more cases being designed for silent PC enthusiasts it would be nice to know if the sacrifice of higher temperatures equals noticeably lower noise.
     
  3. GiantKiwi

    GiantKiwi New Member

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    Corky: When mine has arrived later this week and I've built my system into it, I'll do some noise checks and post them up.
     
  4. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    My system is running, but I can't do any noise checks due to the 48TB file server & 1.5kW UPS in the same room drowning it out.
    As for temps, Asus' auto-overclocking software thinks the system in my sig is happy & stable @ 3.9GHz

    The review doesn't mention the colour choices available with this case:-

    Black chassis / White panels (as shown in the review)
    Black chassis / Red panels (for Asus users?)
    Black chassis / Black panels
    Black chassis / Orange panels (for Zotac users?)
    White chassis / White panels (mine)

    All available either with or without a window.
     
  5. Dogbert666

    Dogbert666 *Fewer Staff Administrator

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    It's not really feasible to do accurate noise testing in the environment we work in.

    The colours are mentioned in the specifications list.
     
  6. GiantKiwi

    GiantKiwi New Member

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    Luckily, because of the place I work, I have access to sound proofed recording booth's to do the audio test in :)
     
  7. do_it_anyway

    do_it_anyway Member

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    Funnily enough I just completed a build in one of these yesterday.

    It really is very quiet.

    One thing I would point out though is I was using a not massive BeQuiet 650w PSU with modular cables and it was a super tight fit. I had to remove the 2.5" bay temporarily to slide it in from the reverse side, then refit the 2.5" bay.
    This bay is clearly not meant to be removed and required much swearing and removing of all panels first, including the base, which was cunningly held in by invisible screws which were hidden beneath self adhesive feet.

    My point being - check your PSU length first!
     
  8. BeauchN

    BeauchN Active Member

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    How easy is it to remove the HDD cage at the front? It could bake a great M-ITX case with a that out and a 200mm rad in the front.
     
  9. vdbswong

    vdbswong It's a Hedgehod

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  10. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Cant you all stop shouting at each other for more than 5 min :D

    On a more serious note, i get that testing for noise may not be possible. Its just a shame that a case can lose points for bad cooling and not get a chance to gain them back, if you are willing to put up with super fast (noisy) fans you can pretty much make any case great at cooling.
     
  11. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    You have to remove the base as do_it_anyway says above.
     
  12. do_it_anyway

    do_it_anyway Member

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    Actually, the front 3.5" cage is part of the motherboard tray and can't be removed.
    The 2.5" cage at the back, alongside the PSU is the removable one.
     
  13. David

    David RIP Tel

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    Are you sure about that?

    Looks to me like the drive cage is screwed to the mobo tray, and only the left hand wall of the drive cage isn't removable; as it forms the upright for the tray.

    [edit] It even mentions it in the review:
     
    Last edited: 31 Dec 2013
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  14. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

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    I'm sure. I've done it (then put it back as I'm using a mATX mobo). See what Spreadie says above me. :rolleyes:

    You have to peel off the sticky feet to access 3 hidden screws holding the plastic base on, to access the screws holding the bottom of each drive bay.
     
  15. iggy

    iggy Active Member

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    ITS NOT A CUBE!
     
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  16. David

    David RIP Tel

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    NEITHER ARE ICE CUBES!
     
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  17. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    But do you have access to high-grade sound meter equipment? The biggest problem in doing sound testing of a case like this is that the equipment to do it - not the room to do it in, which can be nothing more than a broom cupboard lined with egg cartons - is really effin' expensive.

    Here, for example, is the sort of thing you might buy to do sound testing. It's under £15, so what's the problem? Oh, wait... It doesn't work below 50dB - and the manufacturer's peak noise level for the fans in this case is 21.5dBA. For products sold as 'silent,' it's not unheard of for the rated noise level to drop below 10dBA - especially when the fan is inside a case, as with this particular review - so a 50dB floor ain't going to cut it.

    Okay, let's spend more. £113 gets you this - but wait, that only goes down to 32dB. Ooh, this one at £190 has a PC interface - damnit, 35dB. Okay... This one's nearly £270, surely it... What, 30dB? Right, sort by Price - Highest... Ah, this is the most expensive Amazon sells at £582. Now we're talki... 70dB minimum?! Oh, it's for workplace health and safety surveys. Oh, well, I guess that makes sense...

    You know what? Let's forget Amazon. Let's go straight to a manufacturer. Here, Extech do a specialist low-level meter... Oh, 26dB? And it's discontinued? Bah. Right, Norsonic has a specialist 'sound analyser' in the Nor140. Still, it's doable - with a normal microphone, it can measure down to 12dB - although its self-noise level is 26dB, meaning that anything below that level is likely not going to be measured terribly accurately. Also, I can't seem to find a price - meaning it's likely one of those "if you have to ask, you can't afford it" cases. There's a UK company renting 'em for £24 a day, though, which ain't too bad.

    TL;DR: A sound-proof room is by no means the most difficult part of measuring case noise.
     
  18. David

    David RIP Tel

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    So the Sound Meter App for the iPhone won't suffice then? :p :lol:
     
  19. GiantKiwi

    GiantKiwi New Member

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    I'll have a talk with head of Film, he was wandering round a few weeks back with what looked like a rather expensive dB meter checking the noise leakage into an unfinished booth. ;)
     
  20. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    To right it gets expensive, but TBH if i wanted to test and measure low dBA i would use a mic system such as the PS9200KIT along with a spectrum analyser such as SpectraPLUS. But even then you are looking at $2000 for the mic and another $1000+ for the software.
    Is that the manufactures noise level you are quoting there ? as even a silent fan such as the Scythe GlideStream cant get bellow 10dBA even when undervolted to run at only 550RPM.
     
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