News AMD's AM4 socket captured on camera

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 19 Sep 2016.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Jimbob

    Jimbob New Member

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    Personally I prefer LGA, while it is easier to damage the socket while putting the chip in or taking out. Once the chip is removed it is extremely durable and can be left to rummage around a box for months no problem. PGA are easy to remove but extremely delicate once they are out and the pins very easy to bend.
     
  3. Impatience

    Impatience Active Member

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    It just looks.. Cheap. Having a plastic socket compared to the Intel's metal one. Even a metal cover for the raised back portion would've made it look more durable and premium.
     
  4. Maki role

    Maki role Dale you're on a roll... Staff

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    I do prefer the LGA socket style as well, zero chance of having the CPU get stuck to the cooler when removing it.
     
  5. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    Totally the opposite for me. PGA is so much better, because if you bend a few pins, all you need is a mechanical pencil to fix it. If you bend the pins on a motherboard, you're screwed.

    If you intend to use a CPU again after taking it out, you should never let it "rummage around a box for months" even if it's LGA. Why do you think they're shipped with so much protection? Even when you buy CPUs in bulk without heatsinks, they come with static-proof foam padding and a sturdy box.

    Regardless of what you get, the protective containers that CPUs come in are small enough that they're worth keeping. Personally, I tend to only keep the AMD containers, since they're big enough to fit just about any CPU and they come with the foam padding if I happen to need that.



    Also, I'm surprised people are still complaining about things like a plastic socket. The heatsink will cover it up completely and it's a proven working method - why do you care what it looks like?
     
    Last edited: 19 Sep 2016
  6. bawjaws

    bawjaws Well-Known Member

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    It's six and half a dozen for me between LGA and PGA, personally. Working with either needs a bit of care. Completely agree about not leaving bare CPUs rattling about in a box, though!

    I also agree with jrs when it comes to frequent CPU swaps - by the time I come to upgrade a CPU these days, I'm going to be buying a new motherboard (and probably memory too). My days of buying a cheap CPU as a starter and then moving up to a higher-end chip on the same socket are done, I think.
     
  7. Flibblebot

    Flibblebot Smile with me

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    I'm the same - I probably go years in between CPU upgrades these days.

    I think they could have pushed the boat out and found space for another 6 pins, though...;) :D
     
  8. mi1ez

    mi1ez Active Member

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    Last CPU I bought was LGA775!

    Damn, I need to build a PC!
     
  9. Journeyer

    Journeyer Well-Known Member

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    Agreed!
    Those six extra pins wouldn't even have to do anything - they just needed to be there. What a missed opportunity!
     
  10. MrJay

    MrJay You are always where you want to be

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    Form a warranty point of view I totally get PGA.

    ~AMD~

    User - My system wont POST
    AMD - Are the pins on the CPU bent?
    User - Yes
    AMD - You gone ****ed it then, buy a new CPU....

    ~Intel~

    User - My system wont POST
    Intel - *Sigh* Ok send it back for RMA
    User - Inserts new CPU into ****ed LGA Socket 'Hey Intel this one is broken too...'
    Intel - *Sigh* is your board broken?
    User - No its brand new (But I installed the CPU upside down with a hammer)

    People are stupid.
     
  11. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

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    Isn't PGA/LGA a cost thing, LGA being cheaper/easier to convert for use as BGA.
     
  12. Harlequin

    Harlequin Well-Known Member

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    doesn't intel want to go BGA soon anyway?
     
  13. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD More Biddy Bang Bang than Sean Paul

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    Gimme a Slot 1 anyday.....
     
  14. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    As far as I'm aware, LGA is cheaper for the CPU, more expensive for the motherboard. I personally don't find either one easier or harder to use.

    BGA is cheaper than both...
     
  15. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    YES!

    Fun fact: I used to have a Pentium III Slot 1 server which would only boot from cold if you hot-plugged the CPU. No, really. Hit the power button with the CPU seated safely in the motherboard, jack all happened. Remove the CPU, hit the power button, then quickly slam the CPU home: instant boot. Never had any problems other than that, and 'cos I only ever shut it down once in a blue moon I just kind of ignored the problem.

    Wish I'd kept that motherboard now.
     
  16. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    How did you manage to figure that out, and except for the comedic novelty, why would you ever want to keep something like that?
     
  17. none4you

    none4you New Member

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    NAS, Local WEB Server, Firewall, SAMBA, Print Server, PBX/VoIP Server, Streaming Server. .... it is rock stable and can run 24/365.
     
  18. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    I wouldn't consider a CPU that needs to be removed in order to boot properly rock stable...

    I also wouldn't consider a Pentium III build good to act as a server. I know it will perform all those tasks you mentioned just fine, but a Raspberry Pi could do all of those things in a much smaller space, in complete silence, with a fraction of the wattage.
     
  19. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    Slot 2 was better. I always used to have two :D
     
  20. .//TuNdRa

    .//TuNdRa Resident Bulldozer Guru

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    Bugger. I was hoping they'd keep the mounting proportions so I could slap my Archon on without any fuss, I might have to look at getting a kit - I have no idea if Thermalright's later Archon kits even work for the original!
     

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