1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News Apple denies NSA back-door, confirms gag order

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 27 Jan 2014.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    11,741
    Likes Received:
    1,456
  2. David

    David RIP Tel

    Joined:
    7 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    12,954
    Likes Received:
    2,052
    So, no back door in place, they just collate all the data and pass it on as requested?
     
  3. Instagib

    Instagib Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    12 Mar 2010
    Posts:
    1,415
    Likes Received:
    57
    Yeah, why waste your time and effort making a back door when you can knock on the front and ask for anything you want?
     
  4. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

    Joined:
    4 Jan 2012
    Posts:
    511
    Likes Received:
    3
    I thought I would post on this, then deleted it because I don't want to waste my energy on Apple.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    11,741
    Likes Received:
    1,456
    Yeah, pretty much. One of the joys of doing business in the US of A, innit?
     
  6. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 May 2008
    Posts:
    7,700
    Likes Received:
    99
    All ISPs do data monitoring these days, the fact apple monitors there phones is hardly ground breaking stuff. If you download a torrent and the wrong people find out one court order they have to give up your details no questions asked.

    This is even in the uk as well.
     
  7. David

    David RIP Tel

    Joined:
    7 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    12,954
    Likes Received:
    2,052
    There is quite a difference here.

    The idea is that they would have to produce a compelling argument for the court to authorise this monitoring on an individual, case by case, basis. That has been thrown out the window and they are seemingly free to demand/collect any and all data with little or no oversight.
     
    YEHBABY likes this.
  8. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    284
    It could be argued that we have less privacy rights in the virtual world than in RL, sadly i think because it's the internet its less obvious to the general populace.

    EDIT: I'm not even sure they need court orders anymore, I'm happy to be corrected but according to info on the Wiki, a European Union council of ministers in January, 2009, adopted a plan to allow police to access the contents of individuals' computers without a warrant. The process, called "remote searching",
     
    Last edited: 27 Jan 2014
  9. Platinum

    Platinum New Member

    Joined:
    25 Jun 2001
    Posts:
    230
    Likes Received:
    1
    Time to shift to Linux?

    TBH though if there are backdoors in all the software why hasn't anyone independent come across or exposed them, with hard facts and proof?
     
  10. Umbra

    Umbra New Member

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2013
    Posts:
    636
    Likes Received:
    17
    Backdoors in software are not worth worrying about, ISPs can and often do keep records and logs of their customers' use of their systems, how detailed those logs might be, as well as how long they're kept, is anyone's guess.

    The ISPs and other service providers that can keep logs don't generally make public what is logged or for how long, ISP's might say they care about customer privacy, etc, but they don't need the hassle of going to court to defend a customers rights when some law enforcement agency with a court order tells them to hand over the data.

    If someone on this forum posted something that in some way broke the law and law enforcement with a court order asked bit-tech for that persons data would bit-tech refuse?
     

Share This Page