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News Arctic launches semi-passive Freezer i32 Plus

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 30 Jan 2017.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

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    Ummm, don't modern motherboards do that with any PWM controlled cooler depending on the CPU-Temp?
     
  3. desertstalker

    desertstalker Member

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    None that I know of will go to 0 by default...
     
  4. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    No, they don't - and they can't, either. A PWM controller sends out what is known as a duty cycle, which can be anything from 0 to 100%. At 0%, the connected device will be at its minimum speed; at 100%, its maximum speed. If a fan runs from 800 RPM to 3,000 RPM, then at a 0% PWM duty cycle it's running at 800 RPM; at 100% it's running at 3,000 RPM. There are fans, though, that switch off at 0%; if we take this theoretical 800-3,000 RPM fan, it would be running at 0 RPM at a 0% PWM duty cycle then jump to 800 RPM at a 1% duty cycle.

    Arctic's fans as bundled with the Freezer i32/A32 family have a minimum operational speed of 0 RPM. Note that's specifically operational - obviously, any fan can be made to spin at 0 RPM simply by turning it off. Between a PWM duty cycle of 0-40%, the fan will remain at 0 RPM; only at 41% and higher will it begin to spin at all. That's very, very different to the 0%-stopped 1%-go of a typical off-at-0% fan.

    As to exactly under what conditions it will and won't spin, that's up to the motherboard manufacturer and how they map temperature to PWM duty cycles. One motherboard might have 50°C as the 50% duty cycle trigger; another might have 35°C as the 50% duty cycle trigger.

    This explains how PWM works pretty well (PDF warning).
     
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  5. Xir

    Xir Well-Known Member

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    Thank you!
    Interesting fans indeed.

    I noticed most fans have a minimum speed on which they start, which can be lowered while they are running mostly.
     

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