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A/V Audio Splitter & Two Sets of Speakers Ques

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Zabuza, 4 Sep 2012.

  1. Zabuza

    Zabuza New Member

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    Hi all,

    I currently have a Genius Speaker 2.1 SW-N2.1 1100 system, which is nice, but I'd like more for movies and music so was thinking of Microlab Solo 6c. My question is, if I were to use an audio splitter to use both sets, would I suffer from loss of sound quality?

    I have also recently ordered a ASUS - Xonar DX 7.1-Channel PCI-E Sound Card and wondered whether I could just plug one set of speakers into this card and one into mobo and if that'd work?

    Cheers.
     
  2. Deders

    Deders Well-Known Member

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    I have all my speakers doubled up via splitters, sounds awesome. If you were to have one in each card you'd have to assign which programs used which card, don't think you could have both at once.

    You could set it up as a 4.1 setup also if you used the microlabs as rear speakers, or the other way around. I used to have a 4.0 setup and the rear speakers were slightly bassier which sounded great in films. I think I'd prefer to have a sub at the front though.
     
  3. Lance

    Lance Ender of discussions.

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    Get yourself a Digital amplifier like this:
     
  4. Zabuza

    Zabuza New Member

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    Suppose I may as well use a splitter if you didn't notice any quality reduction. Seems like the easiest solution.
     
  5. Tangster

    Tangster Butt-kicking for goodness!

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    Splitters will cause a reduction in audio volume due to the increased resistance. Aside from that, I can't think of problems with a splitter unless it's really bad quality.
     
  6. lp rob1

    lp rob1 New Member

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    Actually, splitters cause a decrease in resistance, due to the resistors (speakers) being in parallel, and the total resistance in a parallel circuit is 1 / ( 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ... + 1/Rn ). The decrease in resistance creates a larger load for the audio circuit, but as the current is usually limited, each speaker gets an overall lower current.
     
  7. Tangster

    Tangster Butt-kicking for goodness!

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    Derp. I should really know that.
     

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