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Guide Beginner's Guide to Machining Plastics

Discussion in 'Modding' started by Captain Slug, 17 May 2005.

  1. mnpctech

    mnpctech bit-tech sponsor

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  2. Djayness

    Djayness phwupupupup

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    This information relates to those using a CNC.

    Machine: 10,000rpm

    Single Pass: 3mm

    Tool: Straight cutter, 30 degree rake

    Speed: 4000mm/min

    Direction of Cut: Climb

    All these factors combined = incredible finish on acrylic cuts.
     
  3. FDAD

    FDAD New Member

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    Excellent guide and description of the various types of plastics!
     
  4. Genghis

    Genghis New Member

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    great guide... thank you a lot for this informations

    it is possible to do chamfer hand made on plexiglas.
    i saw a video where a man chamfer edges with a plate tool with triangular edge cut

    this is the tool
    [​IMG]

    the question is : in a hole, how can i do my chamfers?
     
  5. Javerh

    Javerh Topiary Golem

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    You might want to call the speed as feed instead. Usually speed relates to tool diameter and spindle rpm. So for your case someone could argue that for that speed and that rpm, you are using 0.8mm diameter end mill. Actually, what tool are you using?
     
  6. Nutman

    Nutman Never stuck with stock

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    Thanks for the guide - have some rep
     
  7. NewToPc

    NewToPc New Member

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    nice info bro! thank you for sharing! :)
     
  8. joolz1

    joolz1 New Member

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    Yer thx ,)
     
  9. Foregasm

    Foregasm New Member

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    What about the 'unibit' drill bits? are they any good for plastics?
     
  10. kelvinb

    kelvinb BF3 Username - D0rmarth

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    Just a quick question what tool do I use to make threads for my screws, what would you say is that standard size I would need for a PC case
     
  11. bluc

    bluc New Member

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    Any ideas on embedding leds for edge lighting. Acrylic is fairly thin and am wondering how to drill a hole into the edge to hot glue in an led? Perhaps a miniature doweling jig? Also those drill bits pictured are they avaialable in metric any ideas where to get a set in australia?Great guides Thanks in advance. :dremel:
    edit: Another quick question if you have a bent piece of acrylic and you edge light it does the light travel around the bends like in optic fibre? I read somewhere it is fibrous and have been wondering about edge lighting around bends.
     
    Last edited: 26 May 2012
  12. bluc

    bluc New Member

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    I have seen video of people welding the acrylic with acetone is this bond as strong as the one created by weld on cement?
    EDIT: I joined to scrap bits with the acetone the joint is self supporting after about 10 mins I will let it sit for 24 hours then I will torture it to see how strong it is and report back cheers.
    Edit 2 acetone= epic fail. Not at all a strong and on inspection of the acrylic it barely marks the acrylic. Can cross that off the list! Weld-on on order:)
     
    Last edited: 27 Jun 2012
  13. bluc

    bluc New Member

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    When using weld on #3 how smooth should the edge be to get a strong bond i finished the parts with 180 grit sandpaper on a disc sander they are pretty smooth but a few very shallow grit marks in the edge. Its a reservoir mount and will support about 1.5 kg is this finish ok?
     
  14. Wissel

    Wissel New Member

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    Really good guide and exactly what I needed.

    I downloaded Alibre Xpress as recommended in the OP and its great but wondered if there's better software (free or v.cheap) that people would recommend?
     
  15. Bitwacker

    Bitwacker C# forever

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    A great guide. The posting seems a little old, does this still reflect the current practices? Who are the current players in the marketplace?
     
  16. Mully

    Mully New Member

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    Machining and joining polycarbonate rod

    Hello,

    I am not sure if I should tack my topic on to this thread, or start a new one. I would appreciate guidance. Honestly, I could not find the procedure for starting a new one.

    I want to machine the ends of polycarbonate rods and adhere them to other polycarbonate rods in a T - joint. I hope to cut a "saddle" into the ends of 1/2" rods with a 5/8" bit and join them to un-manipulated 5/8" rods. I thought I'd use a solvent cement so i'm looking for a fairly smooth cut and final joint. However I will be painting (gloss finish) the end result so I suppose there is some room for error as long as I can "touch up" before painting.I hope to mount my handheld router on my router table and build a very substantial jig to feed the workpiece into the cutter. I gather from some prelim research that I'm dealing with a soft plastic and should use an "O" flute tool. Can anyone offer advice on the specific bit (steel/carbide, straight/spiral, single/double) (I even read about using two bits, one to start and one to finish), the adhesive, touch up options, and paint type.

    The finished piece is basically a grid- shaped art project and will hang on a wall. There will be a few blocks of plastic here and there within the grid. The piece will need to support only its own weight.
    Any advice or direction appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Rob
     
  17. Zanib

    Zanib New Member

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    Just my 2 cents... when I machine plastics I use a single or twin flute bit at a higher feed rate with more shallow passes as it then conducts the heat away from the work piece in the chips giving you a crisp edge
     
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