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Other Bicycle Buying Advice!

Discussion in 'General' started by MiNiMaL_FuSS, 29 Sep 2013.

  1. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    There seems to be quite a strong bicycle presence on this forum, so thought I'd look for some advice!

    Let me start by making clear I know nothing about bicycles, nor am I keen to get into bicycles or learn a lot about bicycles! That said I need a new bicycle!

    My needs:
    • low maintenance bike
    • to be used entirely on road
    • flat area (Central Norwich)
    • Just for cycling to friends and the gf in the local area, probably about a 10-15minutes ride each way about 4 times a weeks
    • A budget of just £200

    So all in all a cheap city run around that I wont really have to thing about - and ideally looks nice!

    Happy to consider secondhand, new, road bikes, etc.

    Links, ideas, offers welcome :D
     
  2. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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  3. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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  4. Puk

    Puk (A shrewd and knavish sprite)

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    You can usually get some decent bargains for road bikes if you can collect and check out ebay and gumtree etc. But depends what your after, your first link is a really cool run about and describes exactly what your after, the second sounds like your making the transition into leaving your friends behind!

    I've got a decent road bike for hammering around for miles and its great. But for chilling, i'd go for a fixie, maybe a situpright job with curved bars etc, but then you gotta be careful else look like an academic on his lunchbreak. I'm quite liking the first one for myself now..
     
    MiNiMaL_FuSS likes this.
  5. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    The first does seem a nice run about choice, and unless I find something better I'll probably pick it up.
     
    Last edited: 29 Sep 2013
  6. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    If you can find a Red BTwin Triban 3 in your size, that would be my choice. If you can find a little extra money (£299) it's easily the best sub £300 road bike available.

    The White version seem to be a lower spec than Red. A fixie would be less maintenance but a pita if you decide you might want to go on a longer ride imo.

    That said the schwinn you've linked to is now telling me to buy one :D
     
  7. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    Weird side question...Anyone know how new bikes typically arrive? I assume boxed with the wheels detached? I'd be getting ti delivered to work so would need it to fit in my car!
     
  8. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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  9. fix-the-spade

    fix-the-spade Well-Known Member

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    Serious question, do you really want a fixie?
     
  10. SlowMotionSuicide

    SlowMotionSuicide Come Hell or High Water

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    It's what all the cool kids ride with these days.
     
  11. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    Most fixies seem to have flip flop rear hubs so not so much of an issue if you don't get on with the fixed gearing.

    Bikes tend to be delivered in cardboard boxes with wheels and pedals in the box.
     
  12. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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  13. Malvolio

    Malvolio .

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    From the perspective of a professional bike mechanic: with confidence I can say that you're headed in the right direction. Far too many people think of cycles from their youth or a stereotypical depiction of a bicycle as the de-facto be all and end all of two-wheeled transport. Going single speed with simple brakes is absolutely the way you need to go for your needs. Selectable gearing and other highly complex systems will only cost you money down the line that it sounds like you don't want to spend, so stick to the route you're on.

    Beyond that though, I'll answer a few specific questions you've brought up:

    * State Bicycle Co. - this is just a cheap, pre-built, off-the-shelf import job that the company itself has had no hand in producing; they've just bought something made for dozens of companies and had their logo printed on it. While this doesn't mean the bikes are necessarily bad, it does mean that warranty can be a hassle and that the bike itself is nothing special or interesting. This is essentially off-brand, Tesco pot noodle. It's edible, but that is the only thing I would say about it in polite company.

    * Fixed gear bicycles in general - to expand on the question of if you actually want one - as that is a silly question - what I want to know is have you ever ridden one? These can be quite the thing to get used to, so be prepared to fall off at least several times on your first ride. Get a friend to follow you with a camera for best results.

    * How is a bike delivered - large cardboard box (5Lx3Hx0.75'W roughly) with front wheel off and attached to the non-drive side of bike with zip-ties, pedals and other small parts will be off and in a sealed small box, handlebars (and occasionally the stem as well) are off and either attached to the side/front or in it's own little box. Occasionally the fork will also be removed and boxed on it's own (all these smaller boxes will be inside the larger box by the way), and there is always the possibility that the rear wheel is removed as well. When building always double check the tightness of the cranks, spider bolts, headset, cog, lock-ring, bottom bracket, and cones. If you do not know the meaning of any of these words or don't know what those parts are, I'd recommend getting it built up at a local shop :p or I could just take you though it I suppose.

    Cannot really think of anything else to go over, but feel free to ask me anything you like about anything cycling related.

    Oh yeah, I'd probably go with the Schwinn Racer out of all the ones you posted. Warranty, backed by a large company, good price, cheap and easily replaced common components. I'd buy it.
     
  14. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    Thanks, exactly the kind of advice I was after (+rep).

    I'm hoovering over the buy button for the Shwimm, unless anyone comes up with a better alternative for less than £160 by the end of the day it's sold!
     
  15. Guinevere

    Guinevere Mega Mom

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    Near me we have the Guildford Bike Project, a not for profit that teaches bike skills, maintenance and sells refurbished bikes. It's a good way to get a decent bike in good condition for a good price.

    Near you I found:

    http://www.nabnorwich.org.uk*

    Might be worth having a look at their site. Seems like they sell bikes too. They might have something good. But that said, probably hard to beat the Schwinn at that price.

    *I wonder if they are still happy with their "Not about the bike" name now Lance Armstrong has been outed as a dirty lying cheating git.
     
  16. Atomic

    Atomic Gerwaff

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    If you're only pottering about central Norwich a fixie might do, but getting across the city you got no choice when it comes to a climb... 79ft up Grapes Hill, 76ft up Bracondale, 106ft Ketts Hill, 116ft up mousehold etc...

    Not to mention the 99ft in 0.1 miles Gas Hill but that's purely for crazy folk ;)

    Personally I'd pop into www.pedalrevolution.co.uk and www.streetlifecycles.co.uk and have a chat with them as they are both great local bike shops.
     
    Last edited: 30 Sep 2013
  17. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    Bought the fixie!

    Found a 10% off code for Rutland Cycles.
    TopCashBack do a further 3.03%.

    So it's £150inc delivery, couldn't say no!
     
  18. M_D_K

    M_D_K Active Member

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    Can always throw a freewheel on it if you don't get on with the fixed gear.
     
  19. Somer_Himpson

    Somer_Himpson New Member

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    I would recommend a trip to you Local Bike Shop and try some out.
    And for the type and distance of rides, I would go for a decent Hybrid like the Specialized Crossroads or something similar with gears.
    Fixies are cool but don't like hills.
     
  20. M_D_K

    M_D_K Active Member

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    With a hybrid your then introducing more things to go wrong & break and maintain which is what he doesn't want to do.

    Fixed/Single speed bikes love hills its the rider on top that doesn't, build your fitness up and unless your going up a really long really steep hill you'll be fine, just blast up it.
     

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