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News Bit grabs ATI PCI-Express sneak peek

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by WilHarris, 23 Dec 2003.

  1. bfc

    bfc New Member

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    Thanx for not killing me as some do :)

    I was just making sure everyone knows.

    As for Propriatary, DDR400, SATA, USB2, bluetooth, 802.11b/g isnt propriatary, also i have a PC ATI 8500 in my powermac right now, just reflash the bios, hardware is the same (for some, not all ATI cards)

    I built my own PC's (i'm a LAN gamin' fanatic) but it's just not cost effective anymore, why switch mobo's/procs? I'm using a 5 year old Powermac G4 500 and it's fine for everyday stuff. I got a 3.2Ghz P4 HT with a Intel 875p chipset from dell for 150 bux (rebates & sent back HD/RAM). It has a propriatary motherboard that i cant swap out, but for 150 bux!

    I donno i'm going off in too many directions...... o ya, but most everything besides the Mobo/PPC is non propriatary, and you can run gentoo PPC on a G5 or yellowdog linux. And as a former linux webserver admin it's nice to have a shell right on your local desktop machine (bsd core in os x).

    This seams like a nice fourm, i might stick around :)
     
  2. JADS

    JADS Et arma et verba vulnerant

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    I think your getting confused I was using the Tyan board as an example of PCI-X slots and their size in relation to PCI slots.
     
  3. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    No he was giving an example of PCI-X iirc

    Because the graphics slot is an x16 slot - its got 16x the serial connectors that a 1x slot has which is 1/16th of the size. See the intel pdfs and videos.
     
  4. SpeedFreak

    SpeedFreak New Member

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  5. eldakka

    eldakka New Member

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    A good article (tho a bit dated, late 2001) on the various interconnects, PCI-X, 3GIO (now known as PCI-Express), Infiniband, RapidIO, Hypertransport can be found on www.extremetech.com.

    A followup article was posted in July 2002.
     
  6. ZinK

    ZinK New Member

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    I like most of what you said in this post except the bold stuff. Propagation speed of waves in a conductor is due to its material properties, not the applied voltage. As well, voltage is NOT a measure of how far away the electron is from the atom core. Electron-volts would be the proper measure, as it has units of energy, while voltage is a potential, not energy(it is analagous to gravity). The quantum number of the electron (distance from core is energy) is a moot point in metallic conductors as they are modeled by a "sea of electrons" in Drude theory.

    But I do agree that lower voltage will dissipate less energy.

    Let me know if we are on the same page.
     
  7. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Yea yea i was gonna point that out too...

    .../digs around for chemistry textbooks worried he should know this :worried:
     
  8. nobel

    nobel New Member

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    hi there:
    i have the GA-8KNXP Intel 875p chipset agppro 8x/dual channel ddr mobo does any one have an idea if this mobo supprt the pci-express cards..
    please ..
     
  9. Hiren

    Hiren mind control Moderator

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    Most likely not as you won't have PCI-X slots on the board. Unless of course I'm wrong (has been know to happen on occasion) :D
     
  10. JADS

    JADS Et arma et verba vulnerant

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    Arghhhhh PCI Express is NOT PCI-X. PCI-X is an evolutionary extension to PCI featuring 64-bit wide interface and clocks up to 133MHz (66/100/133). Up from PCIs 32-bit wide, 33MHz interface. It also happens to use rather large sockets, requires a lot of extra chippery and you wouldn't find it on a board under £200.

    PCI-E (PCI Express) is a replacement for PCI that is really quite different in its approach. It is a serial standard that features high clocks to achieve high bandwdith, although the performance can be improved by increasing the number of lanes data can travel down.

    Ok think of roads for a minute, PCI is essentially a minor road with a speed limit of 33MPH and 4 lanes. Now when a car travels down this road it is split into 4 and all of the bits of the car travel down seperate lanes till they reach their destination.

    PCI-X extends this to a 8 lane motorway with a variable 66-133MPH speed limit, but again the car has to be split up to travel down it. You can imagine that getting all bits of the car to arrive at exactly the same time when travelling at 133MPH is somewhat more difficult than it is at 33MPH.

    Now PCI-E (PCI Express) is a one lane road with a speed limit of 2500MPH and a car can travel whole down a lane till it reaches its destination. This road can be widened to 2, 4, 8, 16 or 32 lanes. However cars never have to be split up to travel down the road, different cars can travel at the same time in different lanes. You can see that this is easier as the car arrives whole at the other end and you don't have to worry about some bits of the car being delayed along the way.

    On a final note if your motherboard doesn't have PCI Express slots (and it won't yet) then it will never support PCI Express. PCI Express is a replacement for those funny white long rectangular sockets you have on your motherboard and they aren't something you can simply remove and replace yourself ;)!
     
  11. Piratetaco

    Piratetaco is always right

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    so you want your graphics card to suck in WARM air rather than cool air at the bottom of your case?
     
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