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News Blu-Ray 8 percent of home video market

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 29 Sep 2008.

  1. B3CK

    B3CK Member

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    Thank you bubsterboo, that is does answer my question.

    I do realize that the BR players have more functionality to them than standard dvd players today. And while that is a selling point to me, I still have a nasty taste in my mouth from all the drm that comes included with the BR system. I would say that these points are what drives me to not buy BR products. It just feels to me that the overzealous RIAA and the like are what is driving the technology standards, and not consumer wants/needs. It seems like they are taking the approach of give it time, the consumers will just make the purchases as long as they are the only option available, and therefore are able to make whatever DRM decision they want.
     
  2. B3CK

    B3CK Member

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    Now, something that if changed, would make me jump for joy to upgrade to the BR format would be this:
    Allow me to rip an iso without feeling like a crimanal to my computer/media server, so that I can watch the movie, with all bells and whistles on my TV. With the cost of high capacity hd's always dropping, I can always install new or upgrade my hd's to allow more/new dvd's. I would even allow the powers that be to "watch" those specific folders to make sure I wasn't sharing them with the whole world. But currently, with disc's that end up getting scratched, or stolen, or worse destroyed by a fire or disaster, I will be forever disgruntled with having a huge section of my house filled up with disc boxes, and keeping track of what movie is where, or the kiddies scratching up playing frisbee when no one is around.
     
  3. bubsterboo

    bubsterboo New Member

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    Your 42" plasma have a native resolution of 1024x768 by any chance? At that low resolution you would not see much difference between upscaled DVD and blu-ray.
     
  4. ironjohn

    ironjohn New Member

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    No, almost all of the first BR disks were software upscaled.
    Only brand new content is edited as you describe, 99.99% of all movies out there were, and are not edited this way. For many, most movies, going back and re-scanning the original film is impossible. 50 years from now your point may have some merit, but for real hardcore movie fans finding a high quality DVD transfer of film is in itself very welcome, BR does nothing for most content.

    Enjoy your Seinfeld.
     
  5. bubsterboo

    bubsterboo New Member

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    I'm sorry, but that is totally wrong. Please show me some evidence to back that. Or, simply a single BD release (or hddvd release for that matter) that you claim is software upscaled.
     
  6. schut

    schut New Member

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    This is ridiculous, I have viewed hundreds of blu-rays which I usually watch on my monitor. The sharpness and clarity of these releases compared to ones I upscaled DVD is always far superior and clearly not an upscale. Screenshots from the two of these sources can easily prove you wrong.
     
  7. ironjohn

    ironjohn New Member

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    Wow, I don't really have time for all that.
    Just enjoy your expensive BR TV shows and be happy.

    I watch movies...

    p.s. my plasma is 1080p
     
  8. ironjohn

    ironjohn New Member

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    On a monitor?
    From what?
    1 foot away?

    What DVD player?

    Oh please....
     
  9. bubsterboo

    bubsterboo New Member

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    Alright, BDs and HDDVDs are NOT Upscaled SD sources. DVDs are downscaled from the orignial film source, be it digital (if new enough), or if the final copy is film.

    Heres some screenshots from the film Army of Darkness. I chose this film because It's very old, and was not edited Digitally. It's IMO the "worst case scenario" for my comparison.

    *The frames are not the exact same, I was having trouble finding the same frames, but they are very close.

    Upscaled DVD -> HD DVD (VC-1 Compression for those interested) -> Split between the two
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Ignoring the color differences (I'm guessing the HDDVD was color corrected when it was remastered better then the DVD.) The HDDVD is far superior.
    The Sharpness and detail is what it's all about here.

    No matter how good your upscaling is, you cannot add detail, You can smooth edges that should be soft, sharpen edges that should be sharp.

    Films are Not made in DVD resolution, they are made in HD.

    ironjohn: If you can't backup your argument, i see no reason for you to continue arguing.
     
  10. Major

    Major Guest

    Tell you what...

    If you can't tell the difference between HD and DVD, you seriously, and I mean, seriously, need a pair of glasses or eye surgery or something like that, I have ok eyesight and the difference is HUGE. If you don't normally wear glasses, and you don't have perfect eyesight, if you wear them and watch just a normal TV, the picture will look a lot crisper.
     
  11. dyzophoria

    dyzophoria Member

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    I bet that more than 50% of the people saying that they see no difference between DVD and HD haven't actually seen HD in person
     
  12. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    That is an awesome comparison, and really shows the difference - even, as you say, ignoring the colour. Cheers for putting the effort in to show that.
     
  13. talladega

    talladega I'm Squidward

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    The ps3 has been rated as one of the best upscalers available with only $1000+ upscalers being better quality, which shows even more that HD is way better than DVD.

    Heres a tracking of the sales of DVD vs BD.

    http://vgchartz.com/forum/thread.php?id=23025

    The average LTD sales of DVDvsBD since the release of BD is 92%/8%

    The highest its been is 12% for BD (twice)
     
  14. Burnout21

    Burnout21 Is the daddy!

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    Even now alot of major block buster films are shot on 35mm film as the resolution is much higher than digital devices, it also means its easier to set up difficult lighting for such films like 'BM: dark knight, ironman'

    Because the film industry shots on 35mm every single film released to the mass market has effectly been 'down scaled' so remastering old films from 20 years back for blue-ray is only time consuming as they have to run the 35mm film threw new recorders sampling at a high resolution.

    so next time your in a cinema watching a film, just think your still watching an anolog film from 35mm and that is true HD, ( forgot to mention cinema get sent 35mm film for the projectors, the only thing digital back there in teh projection box is the ipod the guy listens to between reel changes.)
     
  15. clumsy_culhane

    clumsy_culhane Member

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    Some cinamas here (Melbourne, Australia) are digital. I've been to one of them and it jsut doesnt look as good, yet. The colours arent as vibrant, there is less dynamic range (the blacks are not as black..) and i think there is also some nostaligic value in the flickers and black spots.
     
  16. bubsterboo

    bubsterboo New Member

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    Yup, I meant the films that are edited digitally are then transferred to your digital medium. And severely downscaled for DVD. The really old films were edited all on film and thus the final copy is film. Although, yeah, modern movies have copy's on film as well. But those are transfers from the digital copy after editing.

    They are still, and will continue to be mostly shot on film.
    Wasn't apocalypto shot digitally? My friend in the film industry told me this and I was in disbelief as the Picture Quality on the Blu-ray is outstanding.
     
  17. BluFan

    BluFan New Member

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    I don't think an 8% marketshare is nearly as bad as it sounds on paper. You really have to take into consideration that only a small percentage of households have HDTV's (~11-14%). With that in mind, 8% isn't that dismal of a number at all, as it means that an large majority of HD users are running blu-ray. I've actually been working some BR projects for Warner Home Video and they're really backing the format.
     
  18. BluFan

    BluFan New Member

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    I've actually been working with Warner Home Video on some projects and I've got to say, Burnout is right. BR (and HD-DVD) content (old or new) is from a true high definition source and not just some upscaled DVD. The amount of information and overall resolution of BR is vastly superior than SD DVD's; however you do need an HDTV capable of running a 1080p signal to really see the full difference. While running on something less than that will show improvements; it's not going to be it's full potential. It's like racing a Prius against a Ferrari F430- but saying that neither car can go above 35mph... They may both cross the finish line near the same time; but that doesn't mean the Prius is anywhere near the Ferrari.
     
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