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Hardware BrightSide DR37-P HDR display

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by The_Pope, 3 Oct 2005.

  1. FatMaserati

    FatMaserati New Member

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    HDRD or SED...

    I've been reading up on both technologies for a while now.

    I'm a little worried by the 1400 LEDs to light the whole screen, and the 'adjustments' it has to make to the image to make it work. I could be completely wrong, and it could work perfectly. But SED is a pure pixel for pixel reproduction without having to alter the image in any way what-so-ever. It will be interesting to see these two displays side-by-side, then they are actually released onto the market. Only when I see a direct comparison with my own eyes will I make a 'decision'.

    Also, can HDRD match SEDs <1ms response time?
     
  2. The_Pope

    The_Pope Geoff Richards Super Moderator

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    Firstly, since it's LCD-based, I imagine the answer to the response time question is "no". Or rather, "maybe" since the BrightSide tech is in the backlight, and partners can use any LCD panel available on the market. Meaning if there's a 42" <1ms LCD panel on the market, it can be used.

    Personally, I think the response time at that end of the scale is a marketing thing - the Westinghouse prototype has a 12ms response time, and it looks just fine.

    Ultimately, you're quite correct in stating you need to see them in real life before making a decision. We still haven't seen an SED demo but I little birdy suggested you could see some BrightSide-related action later this year :D
     
  3. EQC

    EQC New Member

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    any further word on when Brightside-based TV's/monitors might hit the market?
     
  4. Tim S

    Tim S OG

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    our guys are on the floor at CES, so there may be some announcements there - look out for news. :)
     
  5. EQC

    EQC New Member

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    OMG:
    Over on gizmodo they mentioned that Samsung had on display at CES a TV that I think made use of the brightside tech....it boasted a 100,000:1 contrast ratio...using an array of individually dimmable LEDs for the backlight. Sadly, they also said it'd be out in 2008 "or later." I didn't like the "or later" part.

    Samsung was touting a 100,000:1 contrast ratio...but if they're using Brightside's method, the ratio is technically infinite, but they use the dimmest "ON" setting for the LED's so they can actually calculate a number.

    Anybody from Bit-tech on the CES floor manage to find this thing, or anything like it?
     
    Last edited: 11 Jan 2007
  6. EQC

    EQC New Member

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    Okay, in the Gizmodo posts on CES, I've seen three things I think are using Brightside's technology:

    Samsung 100,000:1 contrast ratio LCD (I definitely saw some images showing an arrayed LED back-light, with each LED individually dimmed/brightened).

    Sharp (I think) 1,000,000:1 contrast ratio LCD (not sure how it worked, but I'm guessing it was more Brightside tech.)

    Texas Instruments DLP (don't remember the contrast ratio, but it was huge)...it had an LED source for the backlight, and the LED's could dim/brighten as each individual pixel was projected. Sounds similar, and not sure if it would fall under BrightSide's pattents. Crazy thing is, I think it still had just one light source...so the LED's would have to dim/brighten many times per frame, not just once per frame as with Brightside's LCD version.

    LG is also using an array of LED's for the backlight (so they get better backlight uniformity, etc), but I don't think they're making the backlight dynamic (yet?).


    Any related info from the bit-tech guys that made it out there?
     
    Last edited: 17 Jan 2007
  7. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Typically saying "1 million to 1" means it's basically unmeasurable because the blackest blacks are essentially pitch black and the whitest whites are pure and pearly.

    DLP LEDs are better because it reduces the colourwheel effect and they used three independent RGB LED arrays to provide the colour combinations. DLP technology is different to LCD, where Brightside corresponds types of colour that are deemed bright or not bright and then it lets the panel display the actual colour, whereas DLP adjusts each individual channel on a per-colour basis.

    Using LEDs as a general backlight gives a better uniformity and power useage than CCFLs, but unless it's brightside it isnt really dynamic.
     
  8. EQC

    EQC New Member

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    More indication of Brightside Technology being put to use in commercial products is found in this article on Samsung's plans for LED-backlit LCD's.

    From the article:
     
  9. The_Pope

    The_Pope Geoff Richards Super Moderator

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    So it seems. Nice spot! Just for clarity, any man & his dog can do LED backlighting if they wish - it will become increasingly popular in notebooks moving forward (about time, since my own HP CCFL backlight is *constantly* on the blink).

    However, Brightside have patents on any dynamic modulation of the backlight so it would seem that Samsung are licensing the tech. I will see if I can find out any more, though they're possibly as bound by commercial confidentiality agreements today as they were 18 months ago when we first published on this technology.

    Anybody seen any recent news on Toshiba SED? :D
     
  10. Da_Rude_Baboon

    Da_Rude_Baboon What the?

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    Toshiba have basically pulled out of SED technology.

    See: http://www.digitimes.com/displays/a20070112PR203.html


     
  11. kgulaalex

    kgulaalex New Member

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    We already have a HDR display. And it`s cheat too.. ridiculously cheap. It`s called a CRT monitor. We should stop throwing money on useless products as long as we have cheap better ones.
     
  12. The_Pope

    The_Pope Geoff Richards Super Moderator

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    Ah yes, CRT technology - ideal for those ultra-thin, flatscreen 70-inch TVs... :rolleyes:

    Incidentally, Brightside was bought by Dolby so this tech is now known as Dolby Contrast
     
  13. RTT

    RTT #parp

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    Forum rule #1: Do not feed the trolls :duh:
     
  14. Smegwarrior

    Smegwarrior Fighting the war on smeg

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    For US$50,000 you could just go out and buy a brand new Marquee 9500LC CRT projector and get 30,000:1 contrast ratio and very little haloing (blooming) and have money left for a decent PC and home theatre surround sound system too.

    Or you could go for a Barco Reality 909s and have the "best of the best, sir, with honours, sir" display but no money left out of US$50,000.

    Either of the above 2 will do full 1920 x 1080p at up to 72Hz and in some cases 96Hz refresh rate and outlast ANY other display, CRT projection is a mature technology and proven to be reliable and very long lasting, I have a CRT projector (standard definition only unfortunately, Sony VPH1000QM) I bought used 14 years ago and it is still going and has NEVER had any repairs done and NEVER had the tubes replaced and I have put over 60,000 hours on it with it also having had 20,000 hours of use before I bought it making over 80,000 hours total.
     
  15. The_Pope

    The_Pope Geoff Richards Super Moderator

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    Maybe so, but bear in mind that was the price back in 2005... You can expect to see this tech on consumer displays later this year, starting with the higher-end stuff I imagine but still in the US$4,000-10,000 range ie Premium but not Insane :)
     
  16. brightside

    brightside New Member

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    Yup Dolby Contrast/Vision should be in displays late 2009
     
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