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News Broadband over power starting to kick off

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by WilHarris, 16 Aug 2005.

  1. blackerthanblack

    blackerthanblack Minimodder

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    Don't know if I pick you up wrong here but domestic supplies do use all 3 phases, it's just that each house only uses 1 phase plus neutral and earth from the main transformer. That is one house will use phase 1, next door will use phase 2, next to that will use pahse 3. Factories use all three.
     
  2. TMM

    TMM Modder

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    should give an all new meaning to "my modem fried itself"
     
  3. GreatOldOne

    GreatOldOne Wannabe Martian

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    Erm... no they weren't. You can still buy them. I have a pair at home, running my network up to my study at a thundering 14Mps. They've just announced a speed bumped version of the kit as well, which will provide 85Mbps over your domestic power circuits.

    As for BB over grid power - bring it on.

    I've seen too many 'trials' of this tech in this county (UK) that amounted to nothing - and as other people have said, even though I live in a large town, the max speed I can get from ADSL is 1Mb, due to copper length.

    Cable is out, as the numbnuts at NTL decided to stop the cable at the next door neighbours house, leaving the rest of the street (including me) without a connection. And WiMax seems to be going nowhere either.

    To be able to just plug in a router to the mains and pull down 4Mb would be great!
     
  4. Darkedge

    Darkedge Minimodder

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    was trialed in brighton by Seeboard. They are running it in Canberra australia too.

    Also arn't they trialling 24mb ADSL here?
     
  5. LAGMonkey

    LAGMonkey Group 7 error

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    24meg ADSL is indeed being trialed in the UK by BT and so is 20meg cable by NTL and Telewest. there are rumours that 50meg connections are being trialed (cable again) but again, its just rumours.

    On the powerline front, one of the reasons why this tech hasnt been very widespread is that the broadband signals propergate from the overhead cables on their way to the home, which in the early versions realy screwed up HAM radio people. One of the other reasons that its been dificult is that these signals are unable to transfer over transformers. In America its more a problem as about 120 homes are connected to one transformer where as in Europe that figure is more like 200. Equipment to move the data arround the transformer is obviously an added start-up cost.
     
  6. Da Dego

    Da Dego Brett Thomas

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    Lag is right that the ham radio problem was actually a very big one. It also interfered with emergency services, which was the basis for its cancellation in the States. And your SPI over there (or, that's what we call Scottish Power at least) was not using the technology as a diagnostic measure, which is part of why it was removed. That, and at the time it actually created interference with the standard power signals.

    However, they've recently perfected a "notching" technology that will actually run the signal in pieces over different frequencies, so that it can avoid the signals that ham and government use. Quite slick, actually. Now there are almost no interference problems and it can be used to find dead transformers/dodgy lines, which gives them an inherenet self-interest on top of the service it provides.

    I notice a lot of you talking about "Well, they tried this like 10 years ago and it sucked..." Think about it...think how far computer tech has evolved in 10 years. There's not really a reason to think someone wouldn't have been working on making this better, too.

    The one thing to keep in mind is that this will not entirely (at *this* point) remove the need for ethernetting your house. You will still require a modem/router, ala cable and DSL. Just like you'd plug your cable modem into the jack, then to the router and out to your house, same deal here. The difference is that now any room in your house would be able to hold your modem, instead of worrying about whether there was a cable or phone jack in the room and having to split that signal.
     
  7. bloodcar

    bloodcar Minimodder

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    This is not 100% true. They've offered two way satellite internet for years. I was looking at it around five years ago but it has a horrible latency and I just wanted to game.
     
  8. glnsize

    glnsize What's a Dremel?

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    The Power companys have been trying to implement this for YEARS. Unlike phone and cable providers they get NO additional revenues from there infastructure... The main problem as i seem to remember it was power convertion ie. Here in the states power leaves the plant at 440 v and stays that way untill it hits a rural area. Then its steped down to 220 v then 110 at the box / pole your house is hung off... The problem was eachtime the power was steped down there was an insaine ammount of interferance. So it ended up being alot like wireless. Yeah 802.11G gives you 54Mbps But once you move ten feet away you have to rebroadcast SO many packets that your effective speed is more like 11Mbps... Same was true for this stuff. Yeah it has a theretical speed of 90Mbps, but by the time you hit your injection point it was more lilke 1 or two... But that was a couple of years ago so they might have worked that out by now. I personaly hope they do i like most people maintain a phone and cable for services i dont even use!

    As for HAM who cares... get IM already!
     
  9. veland

    veland What's a Dremel?

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    All options we can get, helps! I've just installed a phoneline in my new house, only because I need an internet connection (actually I'll cancel the phone subscription soon and only use it for DSL..)

    If BPL had been an option, I'd go with that. Or if there had been some ok wireless systems available..

    Go for it, we have a good infrastructre as for the backbone, it's the last leg into each house that is the major bottleneck right now..
     
  10. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit Modder

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    I remember when our telephone exchange had not been upgraded to ADSL, I was quite exited about Scottish Power trialing this, but then it got dropped, and I had to wait another year on BT.
     
  11. Vigfus

    Vigfus Born to be...

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    Really? Our plants give out atleast 50000V, as i remember it's more like 100kV...
     
  12. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

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    No way mate. The transmission line losses would be HUGE. I guarantee you the long distance high voltage high voltage transmission lines will be operating at a minimum of 100 kV.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#HVDC
     
  13. RadioJunkie

    RadioJunkie What's a Dremel?

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    That is a pretty cool ham radio.

    _________________________
    AES Ham Radio - AES Ham Radio Catalog by AES Amateur Electronic Supply
     
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