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Networks BT Broadband

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Greentrident, 16 Oct 2019.

  1. Greentrident

    Greentrident Active Member

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  2. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    The upgrade is only applicable if you are on the old ADSL-in-the-technical-sense plans (we colloquially use ADSL to mean any broadband over a phone line, but generally we're actually using VDSL or similar). i.e. unless you're on an ancient contract and get 17mpbs down or less (ADSL Max / 2+ / Annex M), then you're already on a 'superfast' broadband link and will not see an upgrade.
    'FTTC' is 'Fibre to the Cabinet' with the link to your home still being copper. Since damn near every cabinet in the country is connected to the backbone via fibre this is more a removal of a arbitrary speedcap rather than any new line hardware. Thimk that's confusing that something with "fibre" in the name doesn't actually get fibre to your house? Blame the ASA for capitulating to Virgin Media's lobbying and allowing advertising of 'fibre broadband' for products that only have a fibre link somewhere at some point in the ISP network.
     
  3. Jeff Hine

    Jeff Hine Nothing special

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    Fibre broadband, to me, should mean fibre to premises/co-ax to modem/router. I dunno if non VM users get connected the same way, so can only speak for how my (VM) connection works.
     
  4. Greentrident

    Greentrident Active Member

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    So if I get 5.5mbps down with no option for fibre does that mean it's old ADSL or not old ADSL??? No FTTC available here but I suppose that's my fault for moving 2 miles out of town!
     
  5. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    It's either an old ADSL connection, or the line between you and the cabinet is in such a poor state that it cannot handle a faster rate.
    VM's 'fibre' broadband is coax to the neighbourhood (same cable shared between ~50 premises with multiple taps), which only connects to a fibre link in the nearest cabinet. Standard DOCSIS setup, no fibre is run to individual premesis.
     
  6. Zoon

    Zoon Hunting Wabbits since the 80s

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    While true for most of their network, there is however an initiative within Virgin Media to roll out FTTP as well.

    Source: https://www.virginmedia.com/corpora...-announces-largest-uk-fibre-broadband-rollout

    Outside those project areas everything will be coax to the cabinet with DOCSIS3 as you say though.
     
  7. Jeff Hine

    Jeff Hine Nothing special

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    That was 3½yrs ago and was prob. the upgrade we got to get us to 200Mbps... we now have 500Mbps available (reminds me; I need to chase up whether the 'top package' I'm on gets that upgrade free or whether it's new sign-ups only).
     
  8. Greentrident

    Greentrident Active Member

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    500!!! [​IMG]
     
  9. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    All over COAX. DOCSIS 3 can get over a gigabit, and DOCSIS 3.1 ups that to 10gig. The problem is that that link is shared between everyone on the same ring, which is why VM bandwidth is so variable throughout the day. When nobody else is using it, you can have that 500mbit slice of the 1gig pie no problem. If 50 people are all on that link, they all need to cram into the same 1gig link and your personal speed tanks.
     
  10. Vault-Tec

    Vault-Tec Green Plastic Watering Can

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    I got mine. Same price. I was annoyed to find that the person who transferred my account to my new address was wrong and I could have had fibre in March. Copper sucks.
     
  11. Jeff Hine

    Jeff Hine Nothing special

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    My guess would be that 3.1 is for businesses...
    So; if I go full cynic/sceptic, why would they allow me to have a 350Mbps connection, if the best they can guarantee me - based on your example - would be 20Mbps...?
    AFAIK, there's no way to perma-monitor a connection for minimum speeds.

    Oh; and yes I can switch to hyper-cynic/sceptic in a heartbeat.
     
  12. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Connection is sold as "up to" 350mbps. Bish bash bosh.
     
  13. Jeff Hine

    Jeff Hine Nothing special

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    Any more you want to heap on the sh*tpile you're looking to bury me in...? Gotta love people who get off on belittling others, usually - but not exclusively - from a site-relevant professional pedestal.
     
  14. Sentinel-R1

    Sentinel-R1 Chaircrew

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    There is....... One method is using Ubiquiti USGs to perform this function for you at user-definable intervals. I have mine running every 30 mins and it's built up enough data over the last year to show me that I'm getting more than what I pay for >95% of the time so in my case, I can't complain.
     
  15. Mister_Tad

    Mister_Tad Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    Chill Winston. There's nobody victimising you here so you can stop playing the victim.

    Back on topic.

    I really don't get the hangup on the physical medium - though the manner in which some ISPs choose to market it is questionable.

    What does it matter if your internet comes through fibre, coax, phone lines or a wet piece of string if it gets the advertised speed? Even fibre can have contention, certainly PONs, and even point-to-point is going to be over-subscribed somewhere
     
  16. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

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    The old copper wires simply aren't fit for purpose in this day and age.
    If cat hair was a suitable material no one would be crying out for FTTP...
     
  17. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    The old copper wires are pretty good, really. It's the slightly newer aluminium wires that are the problem...
     
  18. Mister_Tad

    Mister_Tad Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    from an infrastructure point of view, clearly investment is needed. But as an end user, who cares?

    I know people that have 30Mbit "full fibre". I also know people that have 300Mbit cable, and people that have 70Mbit "fake fibre" FTTC. The copper megabits spend just as well as the fibre ones.

    So long as the customer is properly informed about expected average and minimum speeds, it shouldn't matter. Marketing the medium is just another way for ISPs to over-sell.

    the old adage of what you want isn't a hammer and a nail, you want a picture hanging on the wall.
     
  19. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    The complains about copper twisted-pair is that as every new go-faster technique is implemented, the distance at which it works from the exchange gets shorter and shorted. e.g. G-fast is ~100m for the maximum advertised speeds dropping to 1/10 that at 500m, and that's total link length not as-the-crow-flies distance from the exchange.
    By replacing the last-mile link with fibre even with no change in link rate you now have the capability to upgrade for another few decades. Copper no longer has that capacity for the majority of households. /
     
  20. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

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    Personally I think for the majority of people 20-30Mbit is fine. Basically that is the point where speed stops negatively affecting typical daily usage (live loading and streaming, as opposed to downloading). I think bringing the all too common areas where only sub-8Mbit speeds are available up to scratch should be the focus of most of the investment. Then after that start fully modernising.
     

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