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Building an Extension

Discussion in 'General' started by badders, 17 Sep 2008.

  1. badders

    badders Neuken in de Keuken

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    Okay, using some of the equity from the house, I think we're going to build an extension.
    Really, we want a double-storey extension, extending the lounge and kitchen on the ground floor, and the 2 bedrooms at the back.

    I'm having a builder over for a feasibility quote on the 24th, but obviously that will be for them to project manage the whole lot - foundations, brickies, roffers, plasterers, etc.

    Do I do this first, or would it be better to get an architect in to size up first?

    Next door has a single storey extension, and we'll go with that if we can't get planning permission for a double, although what I really want is a single storey brick extension, with a flat-roof bit on top to extend the bedrooms.

    My best bet may be to manage it myself - I'm not under any (particular) timescale apart from the other half, so I should be able to work around schedule conflicts quite easily - that will be the cheapest option.

    I should probably point out that I'm not allowed to lay the bricks/blocks myself, as the other half wants the walls "In straight lines".:confused:

    Ramble over, time for the Question:
    Has anyone built their own extension?
    If so, what problems should I expect to face? What else do I need to think about? Did you encounter any major problems that noone told you about?

    Thanks all!
     
  2. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    Personally, I'd suggest having someone else manage it - less 'stress' (I've yet to get stressed about anything, so I don't actually know what stress is). It also allows you to palm problems off to other people. A guy here at work 'managed' his kitchen extension/refitting/whatever and all we heard for months was how stressed he was, how blah was doing X wrong and should be doing Y instead. Didn't sound like a barrel of laughs, to be honest.

    The only personal experience I have of an extension was one my parents had done some years ago, and the only thing I wasn't told is that bricks bloody well hurt when dropped on feet. That said, I was barely 13 at the time, so I wasn't involved with the planning stages.

    I'd suggest getting planning permission (I hear that if you word it right, they don't typically refuse you. Might be worth looking into that, if it goes tits up at that stage), then a good architecht (Might be worth getting them done at the same time. Doesn't PP need some sort of drawings before they grant/deny, or are they not fussed by the details?), and then a more 'solid' quote for the work done, at least that way you can go forwards easily, without chasing tails everywhere.
     
  3. heh-

    heh- curses.

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    Yep, planning permission does require detailed plans of the site and proposed work, it may be worth finding out if there are any planning restrictions in your area before getting anything done (ie if you are in a conservation area or somesuch)
     
  4. Ramble

    Ramble Ginger Nut

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    I'd say it's worth talking to the neighbors too and see what they think, stuff like you blocking the sun from the neighbors might get your planning permission denied.
     
  5. Freedom

    Freedom Member

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    I wouldn't gpo for flat roof not worth the hassle. They always end up leaking and once they start its can be hard to get them to stop.
     
  6. badders

    badders Neuken in de Keuken

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    I know I've got to get planning permission, and detailed plans have to be submitted fro that. It's then 8 weeks till I hear a Yay or Nay, at which point I can either get on with starting (subject to building regs/inspections) or revise and resubmit the plans.

    Talking to the neighbours will happen once I find out what sort of Price range I can wiggle this into. If it's too much, then the whole project may be a non-starter.

    Freedom, a flat roof if we go for a double height is a major time and cost-saver. Otherwise I'll have to re-roof the whole back side of my house, possibly affecting the neighbours, too.

    Any more thoughts?
    If this goes ahead, I'll definitely be doing a log for it!
     
  7. UrbanMarine

    UrbanMarine Government Prostitute

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    I'd start looking for a contactor and structural engineer. If you find a good contractor they'll get all the proper permits, design plans, supplies etc etc. A structural engineer/architect is a MUST you don't want to tear out a load bearing wall and have half you house collapse. If you can afford an attorney, I recommend having one on standby just incase the project becomes FUBAR.

    As for your part, I'd supervise the contactor and let him handle the workers, supplies etc. Also if permits are required, I'd personally check into making sure your contactor got the proper permits.

    When I worked construction I met a lot of shady contractors and its always good to triple check everything. Even if you know its right check it again. I came across all types of ****ed up projects that I had to fix.
     
    Last edited: 17 Sep 2008

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