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News Cameron calls for an end to privacy

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 13 Jan 2015.

  1. David

    David Take my advice — I’m not using it.

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    Yep, so Farage and his goon squad will benefit from all the protest votes, and then they'll form a coalition with the Tories.

    They're doing the terrorists works for them - continually impinge on our civil liberties and oppress the population until we can no longer stomach it and rise up.

    ...or, in the case of the great British public, do **** all about it, and whine incessantly.
     
  2. iggy

    iggy Active Member

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    They ARE the terrorists.
     
  3. Shirty

    Shirty W*nker! Super Moderator

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    I, for one, welcome our new cabinet overlords.

    :rolleyes:
     
  4. David

    David Take my advice — I’m not using it.

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    DFS?

    SCS?
     
  5. Shirty

    Shirty W*nker! Super Moderator

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    Wickes. It's got our name on it.
     
  6. jinq-sea

    jinq-sea 'write that down in your copy book' Super Moderator

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    I thought that it was MFI!
     
  7. David

    David Take my advice — I’m not using it.

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    Project: Thread derail

    Mission accomplished! :lol:
     
  8. notmeagain

    notmeagain Member

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    That pompous **** can suck a fat one.

    The governments "Cyber" awareness is an utter joke, and they fear what they cannot control - hence they need to control everything.

    I can understand the desire to "protect" but I can understand the desire for power-grabbing more.

    (tongue in cheek) All of this is a ploy to slowly convert the UK into north korea.

    I've got nothing to hide, but I'd rather do something icky than allow someone to peruse my personal communications/interactions.

    My business primarily uses VPNs and encrypted media (We deal a lot with PCI compliance), by outlawing encryption we're pretty much ****ed as a business, unless Cameron means "Hand over the keys to the crypto", much like a legal intercept for business.

    Then I can see terrorist cells operating through a pakistani call center while purchasing a dyson hoover from Currys.
     
  9. Shirty

    Shirty W*nker! Super Moderator

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    One of the logical progressions of all this control that the government wishes to have: a terrorist cell infiltrates into the ranks and gains control of the systems that the government are using to try and control them.

    It's probably a few years off yet, but no vetting process is perfect and eventually it will happen. All it will take is one bent hacker with access to a bit too much information

    Information is power, and the authorities know this. Too much power at the top is extremely dangerous for precisely this reason.
     
  10. EvilRusk

    EvilRusk New Member

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    I love the 'back door certificates' for secure websites. How is that going to work when you visit a secure website that is not in the UK?

    Will we suddenly have a great firewall where we cannot visit oversees websites because the security services cannot install a back door on them?

    Please can we have something like an 11+ test to filter out politicians like this?
     
  11. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

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    Annd **** this sinking ship.
     
  12. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Nup: they'll just do a man-in-the-middle attack. You'll think you're connecting to the real website over HTTPS, but in reality you'll be connecting to GCHQ over HTTPS which then requests the actual website over a separate HTTPS connection. The contents is decrypted, stored, then reencrypted and sent to you.
     
  13. perplekks45

    perplekks45 LIKE AN ANIMAL!

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    So, essentially, they will change the law so they don't have to break it?

    Did he speak to a lowly IT security engineer with abnormal levels of paranoia (even for that field) to get his advice? Every person with half a brain and a basic understanding of what can and cannot be done to protect an IT infrastructure knows that this will all end in tears...

    Well, fingers crossed we have politicians who will not join in the utterly blind activism of ridiculous ideas concerning privacy vs. security. Oh no, they were briefed by the same people.... Let's hope the source is as reliable as usual.

    [​IMG]

    If not... well, I was thinking about leaving Germany again anyway.... :sigh:
     
  14. Shirty

    Shirty W*nker! Super Moderator

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    Oh the irony of a GCHQ ad at the bottom of this comments thread. Is somebody taking the piss?

    [​IMG]

    :lol:
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2015
  15. EvilRusk

    EvilRusk New Member

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    Does that not mean that the GCHQ point would be vulnerable to DOS attack? The entire of the UK's internet taken out with one attack since anything outbound would need to pass through GCHQ? Hmm...
     
  16. RichCreedy

    RichCreedy Hey What Who

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    not a hacker per se, but didn't snowdan already do summat like that, releasing info, he had no right to release
     
  17. David

    David Take my advice — I’m not using it.

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    That's an interesting take on things.

    It could equally be argued that he released info on what they had no right to collect!
     
  18. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    I see I'm not the only one very annoyed by this. :D

    It maybe tongue in cheek, but it's not as far from the truth as you think.
    http://www.zeropaid.com/news/95119/uk-pms-internet-censorship-insinuation-receives-praise-from-china/
    ...
    Not the way civil liberties work, TPTB need to prove they have a need to take away your right to privacy.

    That's exactly the plan from what i can tell, although that comes as no comfort to me when you consider that in 2013 the authorities made 514,608 requests for similar data
     
  19. forum_user

    forum_user forum_title

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    Yes, because Labour will repeal everything, won't they?

    Plus Labour are the most qualified to restrict the public services to what the private sector can afford to shoulder. Yeah, go for it. Is it win-win, or lose-lose.

    Side note. Anyone know when your liberties started to be eroded away? No prizes. But go on, have a little look into it.

    (Added)

    I have to say Cameron has been very naive. Looks like he is caught between crap advisors and this moment of emotional anger. What he suggests creates lots of questions and security issues. Sony (apparently) can't protect a £40-60million film from hackers, the console gaming providers can't prevent loss of service over Xmas, and the government wants to take away methods of keeping data more secure and private?!?!

    Smells like bollocks to me.
     
    Last edited: 13 Jan 2015
  20. Byron C

    Byron C And now a word from our sponsor

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    I thought I already mentioned this:

    It was actually successive Labour governments that laid the foundations for the culture of fear that we're now living in. My brief research on Wikipedia tells me that 11 "terrorism" acts have been brought into law since 2000 - not even counting RIPA - and all of them were under Labour governments: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrorism_Acts.

    Of course that's not to say that the current government has been a shining beacon of light, however: when the European Court of Justice ruled that data collection practices being employed were unlawful, our government basically stuck its middle finger up and passed a law saying that it actually is legal.
     

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