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Networks CAT5e: 2 sockets, 1 cable?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by riggs, 24 Jan 2017.

  1. riggs

    riggs ^_^

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    Hey all, me again, with yet another question (I swear I only ever post here when I'm looking for advice!).

    Is it possible to run a single length of CAT5e cable from one 2-socket ethernet wall plate to another (i.e., single cable, 2 independent sockets on either end)? I've done some very (very) light reading but I've found conflicting info on the requirements for Gbit ethernet and the number of wires it uses.

    I've moved into a new property and because of the stupid way I have my internet/network set up I'm needing to run cable from one room to another. Room 1 is where the phone socket and modem are (along with the TV, HTPC etc), Room 2 is where I keep the router/server/WiFi AP etc (rack gear, so don't really want to separate it). Essentially, I'd be running a cable from the modem to the router, then running a 2nd cable back from the router to the TV/HTPC etc. Is it possible to do this with a single cable? I could easily get away with a 100Mbit connection for the modem>router, but the other connection needs to be Gbit (for video/steam streaming). Also, 5m or so of the cable will be running outside the property; I was originally thinking of just routing the cable(s) around the skirting boards, but I've spotted aerial sockets in each room. I'll pop these off and replace them with double-RJ45 plates and run the CAT5 cable along the outside wall where the coax currently resides.

    Alternatively, is there such a thing as 16-core CAT5 cable? I'd really prefer not to have to run 2 separate cables.
     
  2. Kernel

    Kernel Likes cheese

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    Basically no, if you were willing to do 100mb only then you 'could' as 100BaseTX only uses two pair for transmission, but most likely the cross-talk and packet collision would screw running another 100mb signal down the same cable. Gigabit has to use all 4 pairs.
    What is the issue with running 2 cables? Or a smart switch utilising VLANs?
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    For a 10/100 link? Yes, but it's not recommended. For a gigabit link? No. You're going to want to run two cables.
     
  4. Hawkest_83

    Hawkest_83 Member

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    Ditto to both kernel and Gareth's comments. Gbit requires all 4 twisted pairs while 100BaseT only requires 2 pairs.

    you could plug a gbit hub at the end you need two ports this would give you a theoretical speed of 0.5gbit per socket max 1 gbit overall

    never see 8 UTP... plus it would be thicker

    how come you're only limited to one cable?
     
  5. TheMadDutchDude

    TheMadDutchDude The Flying Dutchman

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    You can get 16 pair cables, but it's a matter of finding them.
     
  6. play_boy_2000

    play_boy_2000 It was funny when I was 12

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    I've actually seen and used 25 pair cat5e, designed for 12x 10/100 connections, although it had a huge spline in it to separate the pairs somewhat. It only went ~8ft from a locked telco cabinet over to a BIX block cross-connect where it split out on normal cat5e to client suites, but the engineering department fully loaded the cable and got no errors with the fluke tester. That leads me to believe you could get away with 2x 100mbit connections, if you wired it properly. I consider it poor practice, but in a pinch I'll do it with phone lines, though I build a breakout box on either end, instead of hard wiring it. That might not work with ethernet though, as you'd take a hit on the return loss.
     
  7. riggs

    riggs ^_^

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    Ok, thanks for that. Running 2 cables is no problem, but requires a little more work (breaking out the drill and widening the holes etc), 1 cable would've been simpler. Plus I was just interested to know if it's possible.

    Interesting, I'll have a look around and do some research.

    In terms of a single cable solution, I've remembered I've got some powerline ethernet adaptors somewhere. I seem to recall them being ok speed-wise (around 200Mb/s) which will do fine for the modem>router connection. I'll probably give this a go and do some speed/stability testing and if it turns out to not be good enough I'll just have to bite the bullet and run a 2nd cable.
     
  8. teamtd11

    teamtd11 *Custom User Title*

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