1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News CityFibre hits ASA with challenge over 'fake fibre' ads

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 5 Mar 2018.

  1. bit-tech

    bit-tech Supreme Overlord Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    12 Mar 2001
    Posts:
    1,087
    Likes Received:
    18
    Read more
     
  2. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    8,294
    Likes Received:
    174
    I would have thought, legally, that it's above board to claim something is true if it was more than 50% of whatever it was, not that i agree with that but isn't that what CityFibre are in essence arguing?
     
  3. IanW

    IanW Grumpy Old Git

    Joined:
    2 Aug 2003
    Posts:
    6,200
    Likes Received:
    195
    It's nowhere near 50% for me.

    As part of "Superfast Cymru", only the first 20m of my 900m "direct to exchange" line was replaced with fibre, by installing a cabinet at the other end of the exchange car park.
    (Openreach regulations state that fibre DSLAMs may not be installed in the exchange itself).
     
  4. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,329
    Likes Received:
    104
    If that's the case, I could sell crappy dial-up as "fibre optic internet" because only the last few hundred metres between your house and the local cabinet goes over POTS and the rest goes over fibre backbones.

    If you're selling me fibre-optic internet, then I expect to see the end of a glass fibre at my house, or you're a filthy liar.
     
  5. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    8,294
    Likes Received:
    174
    Well in essence that's what they're selling as most "fibre" broadband still uses the same crappy dial-up wires does it not?

    Again, I'm not saying i agree with how they've painted the lipstick on the pig just that I'm guessing from a legal perspective they can argue that if it's more than 50% they're covered.
     
  6. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,329
    Likes Received:
    104
    I don't think that's any more the case as selling "it's less than half horse so it's beef!". There's no 'more than half so it's fine' rule enshrined in any law or backed up by case law.
     
  7. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    8,294
    Likes Received:
    174
    Don't they claim similar things with regards to speeds though? I'll grant you food seems to be held to higher standards, but with broadband it seem not.
     
  8. leexgx

    leexgx CPC hang out zone (i Fix pcs i do )

    Joined:
    28 Jun 2006
    Posts:
    1,320
    Likes Received:
    8
    FTTC should of never been called fibre broadband

    If virgin could be bothered to keep there FTTN nodes not congested (more cards or split cab) that I would call fiber, but not until they make a policy to upgrade high utilisation cabs first (before the high packet loss happens) Heck if virgin would bother with QOS in packet reliability setting (latency and packet priority over speed and mass packet loss)

    its how openreach with ADSL, vdsl and fiber lines have been managed (not enough capacity speed drops fir every one on that big pipe to maintain minimal packet loss and low latency)

    FTTP yes can say 500mb up and down but at least that will actually be down to congestion or more likely the server sending the data (FTTC for most it be the distance that limits your speed)

    Selling actual fiber broadband (for real to the house ) from advertising standpoint is going to be hard as most will assume its a lie and its not fiber and probably just another openreach reseller (even companies that sell openreach FTTP from likes of bt talktalk and sky is a little confusing as its the packages or hard to tell if they actually mean FTTP or FTTC unless it's above 80mb package witch really only bt do)
     
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page