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Scratch Build – Complete Cor Leonis

Discussion in 'Project Logs' started by Attila, 28 Feb 2011.

  1. IcyAero

    IcyAero Member

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    Re-organizing computer hardware for unique case design - sounds like I'm following this. :)

    Just one question, why full ATX form factor motherboard?
     
  2. GravitySmacked

    GravitySmacked Mostly Harmless

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    Popcorn purchased, plently of beer in the fridge, going to sit back and enjoy the thread :cooldude:
     
  3. searching

    searching I am searching...

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    Looks good so far, will be keeping my eye on updates!
     
  4. saxman

    saxman New Member

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    Cheaps is right about this stuff. There are some additives for preventing corrosion in bimetal systems but these solutions wear out over time because they work using Ion exchange. Eventually you will end up with really expensive tap water.
    Cars can get away with mixed metal and Ethylene Glycol Systems because the is so much more heat produced over a larger area.

    The best way to ensure corrosion doesn't happen to you is to not mix metals.
    Would hate to see an Attila mod succumb to galvanic corrosion.

    -Your Friendly Neighborhood Metallurgist
     
    Last edited: 7 Mar 2011
  5. perplekks45

    perplekks45 LIKE AN ANIMAL!

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  6. Fingers66

    Fingers66 Kiwi in London

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    Subbed! :thumb:
     
  7. HourBeforeDawn

    HourBeforeDawn a.k.a KazeModz

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    wow very nice so far, although and I know its not really needed but I think a full coverage water block would just look cleaner but I understand that would be more difficult to design.
     
  8. stuartwood89

    stuartwood89 Please... Just call me Stu.

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    I'm so impressed by those bends. Never seen a GPU orientation like that before, but it looks awesome. I'll be keeping an eye on this.
     
  9. Multiplectic

    Multiplectic His Stigness

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    After Nair... Subbed for sure! :D
     
  10. Gtek

    Gtek Doesn't raise the bar; he IS the bar.

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    I'm using the same GPU orientation in K3N. Good to see I'm not on my own in it :D ...And looking forward for the rest of course :thumb:
     
  11. voigts

    voigts New Member

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    I love the idea of changing the orientation of the GPU. That is an idea that I've already had in my mind for some point down the road. I don't really understand why you use such thick alu. That alu is like 3 times thicker than it needs to be to accomplish the same thing. I must say that those bends look excellent. I never get over your tenacity when it comes to filing.

    I've been watercooling now for about 6 years, which may or may not mean squat, but I'll throw my 2 cents in here. I'm not trying to ride a hobby-horse, but as a general rule, there is good reason why watercoolers have harped and harped on not using alu with copper. There have been multiplied examples of corrosion. The Apogee GTX "military grade anodized" alu top was the apex of this. There were gobs of people that ended up with corroded tops. The gunk from corrosion will work its way throughout a loop. Koolance among others also used to make alu rads, which were nothing but trouble. It is because of the problems associated with corrosion that you don't see many alu watercooling parts anymore-thankfully.

    You won't have trouble in a car, as a car is designed to run 50/50 ethylene glycol. The corrosion inhibitors in the antifreeze moderate the problem. As most of us probably know however, ethylene glycol lowers the efficiency of the water in its ability to transfer heat. Hence, car radiators are sized accordingly to account for this.

    A really solid anodizing of the alu blocks can mitigate the corrosion issue as the anodizing creates a barrier between the alu and the water. The anodizing however needs to be flawless, as just one exposed part can lead to problems. If you run around 20% antifreeze or like substance with good corrosion inhibitors, and flush things out regularly, you can slow the corrosion process down to the point of being insignificant. Obviously its not the ethylene glycol that is needed in mixed-metal loops, it is the corrosion inhibitors included in antifreeze, and antifreeze is a cheap solution. Most people however don't want to mess with having to run corrosion inhibitors, and deal with any potential gunk issues.

    So to boil it down, if you get a good, solid anodizing layer on the blocks, use a good dose of anti-corrosive, and flush regularly, you will do fine. It is just so much easier using distilled water with a killcoil or biocide and being done with it. You also don't loose any heat transferring efficiency that may occur with certain anti-corrosives.

    Now I'll move on to admiring your excellent work as always. :jawdrop:
     
  12. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

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    Diethylene glycol might be a better choice-it's more efficient than ethylene at corrosion protection, so it takes less to achieve the benefit.

    If you were in the US, I'd HAZMAT-ship you some from the lab. I've got a fluid here that has a chunk of aluminum tied to a chunk of copper with steel wire and no corrosion after eight months. It's not even DEG but something more umm... strange but it's pretty much dead even with DI water for cooling capacity and still works just fine with any metals.

    If you ever get a hankering to mess with chemicals and want to try it, LMK and I'll get you the formulas.

    Also, for DEG, it's the same as G48 Glysantin (as opposed to G11 or G12 Pentosin) and in the US is marketed as Zerex G05 at NAPA and other auto supply chains. That's where I get mine, and I get it undyed as G05 so I can add any color I want to it.
     
  13. NavidsonRecord

    NavidsonRecord Where the bloody hell are ya'?

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    Its only 3mm alu... I know it would be strong just being 1mm but dosen't look anyway near as good as 3mm... I think 3x the filing is worth the look...
     
  14. mars-bar-man

    mars-bar-man Side bewb.

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  15. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    Sounds interesting. What's this strange liquid called?

    Alternatively, some companies still reclaim Fluorinert (Perfluorcarbon PF-5080 or similar). A bit pricey but fill-and-forget: no corrosion, no conductivity, no bacterial growth: 100% inert.
     
  16. Attila

    Attila still thinking....

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    Thanks Yemerich. :thumb: I'm glad my work has inspired you.

    Thank you. :) You can start here.

    Haha., well thank you, but this may not even be finished this year. Though I'll try. :D

    I don't know mate, your filing looks pretty good to me. :thumb:

    Thanks. :thumb:

    It's a mATX board. ;)

    Haha, thanks mate. :)

    Thanks. :)

    Thanks, see below. :)

    :D

    :)

    Thanks. :)

    Thanks. :)

    Thank you. :)

    Thanks. Yeah, This way of mounting a GFX card can highlight some of the awesome coolers out there, save space and, at the same time obscure the ugly side. :thumb:

    Thanks voigts. :thumb: I've got a lot of 4 mm plate here left over from Na'ir, but this part is also a main structural part tying in all the major components of the chassis. It needs to be strong.
    See below about the WC.

    Wow! Thanks for all that info Kayin. :thumb: I've copied and saved this for further perusal. :D

    It's 4 mm, but you are right mate, it looks cool. ;)


    Now, first of all, I cant believe this amazing response to the start of this project, WOW!

    Concerning the corrosion problem, thanks for all your replies and advice. I am aware of this problem and I will experiment with the system as a whole when I've made (and purchased) all the loop components. The aluminium parts will be hard anodised and if necessary, the copper parts will be re-made in alu as well. Some form of corrosion inhibitor will be used, and thanks to Kayin for the list of alternatives. That I'm not as concerned as some of you boils down to the fact that what I'm making here has a very limited working life (as a functioning PC, though not as an 'object'). This cooling system is designed and made specifically for this project, this case, this hardware etc. The CPU block will probably not be suitable for any other motherboard. In short this project has to function as a PC but it doesn't have to do this forever. Na'ir al Saif has been sitting on my desk since October last year being used as my main rig. It will be my main rig till it's replaced by this one. And on it goes...................


    I haven't been able to make anything really new because of some redesign work on the main parts of the chassis. Because of this, the mobo/GFX tray had to be re-made so this took some time but it actually saves time in the long run, because it makes the chassis much more rigid and also gets rid of six parts that were used to connect the old tray and two of the bulkheads to the third (front) bulkhead. So only a few pics this time, because I did some things differently from last time.

    Here you can see the new part is larger than the old one.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I had some problems with the c/s on the old board but some lubricating fluid fixed that.

    [​IMG]

    Instead of routing a channel for the bends, this time, I cut a small trench with the hack saw and then filed the 'V' groove to depth.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    And the new part.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Now, next time I should have something new to show you. :hehe:
     
  17. Attila

    Attila still thinking....

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    I've looked into Flourinert and would love to use this stuff. But four hundred bucks a litre is just crazy. If anyone knows of a cheaper source (MUCH cheaper :hehe:) please share your info. :)
     
    Javerh likes this.
  18. Javerh

    Javerh Topiary Golem

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    ^^ Did you just quote 18 different questions in a single post? +repworthy! :eeek:

    Oh, and the case is coming along too!
     
  19. Blooddrunken

    Blooddrunken In Flames we Trust

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    It's looking so awesome. crazy. :)
    When I checked some german watercooling stores for fluids for my build I saw the Double Protect Ultra from Aqua-Computer.
     
  20. Waynio

    Waynio Relaxing

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    Wow $400 per litre :lol: I would say get them to sponsor you but I think you'd be better off finding an alternative solution :thumb:.

    I love this method for bending thick alu, I first seen it on NavidsonRecord's log, I just didn't think too far into it that with some sturdy extra supports can make it totally strong :rock:.
     

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