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Displays Display Calibration - How Good a Match Can You Get?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Gareth Halfacree, 14 Aug 2019.

  1. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Because while a crap display may make a properly mastered image look crap, a good display will NEVER make a crappily mastered video look good.
    On top of the entire home cinema industry (which would not exist if there were not people willing to pay for not-$#!& image quality) there's any sort of digital signage or other situation where you will see an image, logo, or even branding colour both on a display and in print. Even someone blind as a bat will be able to tell if Colour A does not match Colour B.
     
  2. Dr. Coin

    Dr. Coin Active Member

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    My comment was poorly worded. I wasn't trying to say that they are not using it, just pointing out that with the state of the end user products, it probably mostly wasted effort.

    True, but in practice most people only have access to displays that are not rendering the colours true, but an image that has been modified to look "better" per the display designers. Hence there being all those preset video modes on TVs and monitors, image enhancements features and TV with features such as Sharp's quattron. All these are taking the raw data and interpreting how to render the image i.e. changing the data.

    Quality and are gullible... TV and projector products are just as filled with gimmick and bogus claims as the well acknowledged audiophile market. Don't get me wrong, I will pay more for a TV and monitor that produces an image I feel is better. But I acknowledge that this is a subjective opinion and has little to do with buying the TV/Monitor that produces the truest green.

    I don't know if digital signage is tuned for accurate colour correction or not. As for physical print, this aggress with what I initially said. The publishing industry needs to be very aware of how colours are rendered vs how they will physically print.
     
  3. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    Even if you forget entirely about final display, then you still need accurate monitors for video production, both during editing and initial capture. All your video, still and CG sources will eventually need to be composited, and it is no good if (for example) your physical prop and its CG counterpart aren't the same shade of blue when you try and switch between the two seamlessly.

    As for consumer displays: as well as the high end of home cinema where buying a TV comes with the installer wielding the display calibrator (and the business card to book future calibrations), even mass-market displays have calibrated display modes in addition to 'showroom floor' modes.
     
  4. Dr. Coin

    Dr. Coin Active Member

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    That I had not considered.
     
    Arboreal likes this.

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