1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

E.U: Leave or Stay? Your thoughts.

Discussion in 'Serious' started by TheBlackSwordsMan, 22 Feb 2016.

  1. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,626
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Grayling was in charge of the cherry.
     
  2. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    14,194
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Then there'd be a glacé dogturd on top.
     
  3. wolfticket

    wolfticket Downwind from the bloodhounds

    Joined:
    19 Apr 2008
    Posts:
    2,921
    Likes Received:
    225
    Had to share this as "This is on top of the agreement we’ve signed with Liechtenstein." may be the purest bit of accidental Partridge I've ever seen.
     
  4. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    14,194
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    Not enough characters to add "and the Faroe Islands" on the end. Shame.
     
  5. DXR_13KE

    DXR_13KE BananaModder

    Joined:
    14 Sep 2005
    Posts:
    9,119
    Likes Received:
    364
    What is accidental Partridge?
     
  6. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    14,194
    Likes Received:
    1,696
     
  7. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

    Joined:
    23 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    11,536
    Likes Received:
    1,445
    Alan Partridge is a comedy character described as so -

    'Accidental Partridge' is when someone inadvertently says/does something that the character would, thus living up to the stereotype.
     
  8. DXR_13KE

    DXR_13KE BananaModder

    Joined:
    14 Sep 2005
    Posts:
    9,119
    Likes Received:
    364
    Thanks. You learn something new everyday. :D
    As for brexit... holy s***... WTF?
     
  9. Anfield

    Anfield Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    15 Jan 2010
    Posts:
    5,194
    Likes Received:
    414
    Look on the bright side, at least thanks to Brexshit we can share our culture with the world, for example a Swiss newspaper took their time today to explain the Theresa May / Black Knight analogy :hehe:
     
    Corky42 likes this.
  10. DXR_13KE

    DXR_13KE BananaModder

    Joined:
    14 Sep 2005
    Posts:
    9,119
    Likes Received:
    364
    That is amazing!
     
  11. adidan

    adidan Guesswork is still work

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2009
    Posts:
    14,194
    Likes Received:
    1,696
    I see Trump and Trump Jr have been piping up about it.

    Trump reckons he would have had a deal done quickly (it's not deal terriory, it's a Withdrawl Agreement) and old Junior reckons it's the end of Democracy (yeah with talk of a second referendum about a specific choice, that's the death knell).

    So, if anything, that has given me renewed hope. :)
     
  12. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

    Joined:
    20 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    10,741
    Likes Received:
    777
    I saw that news piece.

    It made me laugh that, of all people, the Trumps are calling some other countries democracy dead.

    Not to mention that Trump Deuce is somehow even more useless than Trump Prime.
     
  13. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,626
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Theresa May being the useful idiot as always; the UK is still going to crash out without a deal.
     
  14. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,354
    Likes Received:
    331
    You say that but this article on the human rights blog throws up some interesting questions.

    The TLDR version is that A50 notification would lapse as without legislating to remove the European Communities Act 1972 simply leaving without a deal would not only break the law but also our constitutional requirements as the EU (Notification of Withdrawal) Act 2017 did not permit the government repeal the European Communities Act 1972, it only gave the government permission to give notice of A50.
    And...
    In summary, it was an Act of Parliament that brought the UK into the European Union thereby giving EU law domestic effect, and so only an Act of Parliament, rather than merely a meaningful vote, can undo this as a matter of constitutional law.
     
  15. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

    Joined:
    20 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    10,741
    Likes Received:
    777
    I think, if anything, the current government has shown that its interpretation of laws is loose at best.

    I doubt this will make any difference to them.
     
  16. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,354
    Likes Received:
    331
    It would if what they think is leaving without a WA on the 29th turns into an automatic withdrawal of A50.

    It's not something they'd have a choice on as A50(1) states a decision to withdraw must be in accordance with the member state’s constitutional requirements and as our constitutional requirements are that an act of parliament can only be undone by another act of parliament if an act of parliament is not passed then A50 would automatically be withdrawn.
     
  17. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,626
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Interesting. Very interesting!

    The UK government Indeed has only a tenuous grasp on reality, but even it realises that it still has to pass a shitload of statutes and bills in order for the UK to just function outside of EU law. This is what Hammond alluded to when he said it was too late to Brexit on the 29th now. This would be congruent with Parliament indeed having to actively repeal the European Communities Act 1972.

    Will Parliament do that without a deal in place? It may just because let's face it: they are all ball-less pussies. It's not as if they didn't vote to enact the EU referendum bill and trigger Article 50, even though they all agreed it was a bad idea. Will of the people™ etc.

    Also, the EU would have to go along with that interpretation, and I'm not sure it wants to.

    It will become interesting past 12th April; if the UK does not leave the EU after that date, it will suddenly be a member without elected MEPs to represent it.
     
    Last edited: 20 Mar 2019
  18. Risky

    Risky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    10 Sep 2001
    Posts:
    4,095
    Likes Received:
    36
    Gareth's point I was replying to was that the purchasers needed to be protected from the international banana sellers.


    Missing my point by miles (not sure if you are also implying because you are assuming I am a brainwashed mail reader).

    • The EU decides that the grading of bananas needs to be done by legislation at EU level.
    • Grading specifies first grade criteria on external appearance, including curvature.
    • I do not state or imply that this bans anything.
    • I point out that bananas in the supermarket are sold according to a bunch of criteria that have nothing to do with this legislation and managed to evolve without legislation perfectly well enough.
    • Yes people can buy lower classed bananas. I might suggest that grading fruit on external appearance is not helpful in this matter.
    Basically I agreed with you that the EU never banned bananas but I continue to contend that thing grading is a pointless waste of time and money

    Sorry for not changing my opinion when told to.


    My bleeding point was not that we should leave the EU to remove banana classifications, but that the banana myth had it's origin in the EU pointlessly over-regulating stuff that just doesn't really need it.

    Saying that everything the EU has ever done is wonderful is as dumb as saying everything it ever does is bad, y'know?
     
  19. liratheal

    liratheal Sharing is Caring

    Joined:
    20 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    10,741
    Likes Received:
    777
    It's all well and good saying that - That the withdrawal of A50 is automatic on failure to put a withdrawal agreement in place - But for the current government to care I think they'd need to put country before party. Something that seems at odds with being in the Conservatives right now.

    I'd wager that we're going to trip and fall into no-deal because the EU27 won't vote for an extension without a plan from us, and May doesn't even know the procedure to ask for one - Having written a letter instead. To imagine there's a plan underneath that two-dollar robot brain is, I think, just a little too hopeful.

    I'm not convinced the EU27 will do much as a collective that isn't pushing the boat away from their dock. It's all well and good saying they don't want the blame - But they don't seem to have the blame at home, and they're damn sure going to get blamed by the UK whatever happens. They could give every UK citizen free money and they'd still be painted as the bad guys by a number of our 'news' papers and politicians, so what benefit is there to the EU to getting involved further with the British sinking their own ship?

    At the end of the day, they're going to do what's best for the Bloc, and kicking the can down the road doesn't seem to be what's best for the Bloc.

    And Risky.. It's not just banana's. The point is that all goods are regulated so both buyer and seller knows what's going where. Those regulations provide a structure for purchasing for the bigger players, and protections for us - The nobodies in comparison - from shady sellers.

    It could be a banana, or a monitor (as Gareth mentioned earlier), or a big bottle of lube. The point is to protect the smaller people in the chain from the bigger entities. Not everything the EU does makes sense, no, but consumer protections are absolutely, 100%, not a waste of time or legislation.

    Without those protections, if you go to buy a carrot and Tesco sells you a horse tongue spray-painted orange with some astro-turf glued to one end, there's not a whole lot you can do about it.
     
  20. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2001
    Posts:
    33,626
    Likes Received:
    1,275
    Hey, nice straw men again! Do you collect them?

    I think that Gareth has demonstrated in some detail how EU regulations are indeed useful and necessary. To generalise the argument a bit: a lot of aspects of your life run relatively smoothly, and safely, because of legislation that you are not even aware of (and why would you be? The whole point of this legislation is that you don't have to be). Only this morning you got up from your by legislation fire-retardant bed linen and pyjamas, brushed your teeth with by legislation safe toothpaste and safe, clean drinking water, then had breakfast which by legislation is safe from impurities and pollutants and the contents of which are a reasonable reflection of what it says on the box. Perhaps you used a by legislation safe toaster or coffee machine without electrocuting yourself. You may have also used a by legislation safe electric shower, or one heated by a boiler which by legislation was safe and did not choke you to death overnight with carbon monoxide poisoning. You then drove to work in a car which by legislation is safe to drive, on fuel that by legislation is relatively pure and won't damage your engine, from a pump that by legislation did not short-change you as you filled up the car. Need I go on?

    A lot of this legislation happens at an EU level so you can enjoy goods and services from all over the EU, or imported into the EU, without worrying about all that. Only a naive person would trust market forces to offer sufficient protection, because the consumer inevitably is at the shitty end of the information and power asymmetry.
     

Share This Page