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News Eolas sues half of the Internet

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 7 Oct 2009.

  1. Shagbag

    Shagbag All glory to the Hypnotoad!

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    I do find it amusing to read the outcry over this when the silence was deafening over the recent SCO debacle.
     
  2. Burnout21

    Burnout21 Is the daddy!

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    what scum!
     
  3. [USRF]Obiwan

    [USRF]Obiwan What's a Dremel?

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  4. Dragunover

    Dragunover What's a Dremel?

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    "and was issued to the company earlier this month."
    Right. Let's just end the story there.
     
  5. Chocobollz

    Chocobollz What's a Dremel?

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    What's with their company's name, it looks like they're founded in Middle-Earth LOL. Maybe it's founded by Frodo Baggins? :p
     
  6. Horizon

    Horizon Dremel Worthy

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    If the tech has been in place for the past 10years. The patent will be dissolved due to prior art, unless they [Eolas] can prove that had developed the tech much earlier.
     
  7. LucusLoC

    LucusLoC What's a Dremel?

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    patents *are* necessary. they encourage investors to invest in innovation. without protection of the intellectual property there is no guarantee of a return on investment. this works especially well for objects, such as the invention of the transistor, or the development of th integrated circuit. neither of those inventions would have happened if the inventors were not guaranteed to retain financial control of their ideas. did the patent discourage free use of the idea after the invention? absolutely, but looking it it from that perspective discounts the fact the the invention would have never come to be in the first place if investors had no incentive to finance the inventors in the first place. patents do encourage invention, because they protect the inventors financial interests, which gives them motivation to actually invent.

    patenting *software,* on the other hand, is like patenting a plot device in a novel. "i am going to patent the plot twist where the main antagonist is the protagonists father." see the stupidity of that? it is like saying i am going to write a book, and no one can write a similar book, even if it is entirely original. it is for that reason that i think that software should only be allowed a copyright, and not a patent. copyrights cover duplication, not methodology. with software i can find a different way to do the same thing, and it is not trampling on your IP, if i copy code then it is.

    should blizzard have a patent on MMOs? Should Corel (or Star) have a patent on word processing? that is silly. similarly patenting "interactive, dynamic web content" is silly.

    this is not to say that patent and copyright laws are fin as is. they are not, and both need a massive overhaul. but we can't just say its borked, throw it all out, since the concept is necessary for progress.
     
  8. general22

    general22 What's a Dremel?

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    Hahaha thats exactly what I thought. Also this is the most hilarious patent suit I have ever seen.
     
  9. str3732

    str3732 What's a Dremel?

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    The patent protects the idea, whereas the R&D budget goes to the implementation. Hence when a company applies for a patent it forbids other companies from implementing it, or coming up with it, without paying a cut. You can patent things that you cant make. You wait for someone to do the work and then you go on an extortion expedition.

    You can also patent the bleeding obvious, like the one click buy button. Truth being said the patents discourage innovation. This is proven historically. The industrial revolution worked for the most part without patent laws.

    Would anyone consider writing some OFDM digital receiver software (802.11b, 802.11a, 802.16, DSL, DAB, DVB-T, DVB-S) when there are companies stateside that own 3000 patents on them. No matter what you set out to do, you will run afoul of them.

    Investors need to invest money to make money. They will invest whether patents exist or not. Banks did finance factories and new businesses during the 1800s when the patent laws were non-existent.

    The first patent troll was a lawyer in the USA. This gentleman found penniless people who invented various bits and bobs for cars. He bought their inventions and then sued car manufacturers for his cut. The thing is that he didn't invent anything himself, the defendants had thought of and developed their own bits and bobs. So he contributed nothing to their product. Yet he was asking for a cut, because he had patented the idea. When people act this way towards shops (asking for a cut) its considered a crime, its called extortion and its carries imprisonment sentences.

    Having said all that, I sincerely hope that EOLAS gets awarded the maximum amount of damages from each defendant. The IT companies mentioned in the brief have all been awarded numerous frivolous patents, and personally I find it fair and heartwarming to see them on the business end of the barrel :)
     
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