News European Commission launches iTunes probe

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Tim S, 4 Apr 2007.

  1. Tim S

    Tim S Well-Known Member

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  2. Pricester

    Pricester New Member

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    I'm no expert on this (dated a lawyeress once, don't know if that helps or not), but the impression I get from both the original article (and other reporting), and the EU's very definition of a "Statement of Objections" is that this will be a public and legal forum for Steve Jobs to repeat his Open Letter to the copy protection industries.

    While the original open letter pushed at the RIAA and MPAA with a challenge to respond, this investigation will allow Apple the chance to formally and legally blame the RIAA and MPAA for forcing Apple to break the law.

    I reckon it's much like the police arresting a small-time drug dealer - not to get at him, but to target his supplier and get the testimony they need...
     
  3. cjmUK

    cjmUK Old git.

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    I read it the same way. The EU isn't going to fine Apple 23 gazillion euros; it will simple tell it to stop selling DRM-infected music within the EU. The RIAA will then have to relent and grow up a bit, or they'll have to stop selling digitally in the EU. With EMI music selling DRM-less, it means that punters will still be partially supplied with cheap musical goodness, while the RIAA will see its members profits plummet. One will assume the MPAA will be equally affected.

    This is all based on the premise that the EU legislators know their arses from their elbows and don't screw it up.
     
  4. Da Dego

    Da Dego Brett Thomas

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    And in the meantime, it will greatly hurt Apple's revenue streams from iTunes by shutting out almost half of the digital distribution world - "don't sell DRMed music" is exactly what I'm meaning by apple ending up penalized. That is a pretty serious thing.
     
  5. cjmUK

    cjmUK Old git.

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    I'm hardly crying into my cup here. Apple have be complicit with the big labels if perhaps not as bad as them, but they have been making loads of cash all along. They've been quite happy to sell music which can only be played on their own devices.

    Nobody is going to starve here.

    And let's face it, the results will be leaked in ample time to allow the labels and Apple to come to new arrangements. If they don't it will be their own fault.
     
  6. DXR_13KE

    DXR_13KE BananaModder

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    so... this is a way that the EU made to change the RIAA.... nice :D
     
  7. cjmUK

    cjmUK Old git.

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    Hopefully...if it works...
     
  8. Constructacon

    Constructacon Constructing since 1978

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    That would cause the most hurt to the RIAA (and MPAA) as they will be the ones missing out on their cut of the sales. EMI (and anyone else who follows suit) will benefit more as their products will become more prominent on iTunes due to a smaller field of offerings.

    The best thing that can come out of this is if the EU only allow DRM free products at a uniform price structure accross all regions. At worst, more of the public will become aware of what their plight actually is and hopefully more people will rally to their own cause.
     
  9. Fod

    Fod what is the cheesecake?

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    uh, does the RIAA hold any authority in the EU whatsoever?

    i thought it was the BPI that called all the shots over here
     
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