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Filming/Recording Police

Discussion in 'Serious' started by AcidJiles, 8 Dec 2010.

  1. AcidJiles

    AcidJiles New Member

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    Just read this story about an american sent to prison for recording police. http://reason.com/archives/2010/12/07/the-war-on-cameras/ Was wondering what is the UK law current position on recording policemen either on film, cameras or voice recorders? Is the law different for one on one situations rather than in a protest for example where obviously the police being filmed by loads of people?

    What are peoples thoughts on this? I am generally of the opinion that as long as people aren't following the police round with video cameras you should be able to record any interactions between you and the police within premises or on the street. The police record your interviews in a police station so why shouldn't you have a record of your dealings with them. Should you be required to inform them of this action or not?
     
    Apophis54 likes this.
  2. VipersGratitude

    VipersGratitude Well-Known Member

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  3. BRAWL

    BRAWL Well-Known Member

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  4. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

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    Well when I speak on the phone to anyone that I think I may need to be able to reference the conversation later on ( Bank police etc ) I will always record it and tell them that I am.

    I'm sure its not worth anything in a legal way but handy to be able to check what was actually said.
     
  5. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    Thin end of the wedge this... mark my words.
     
  6. supermonkey

    supermonkey Deal with it

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    Well, if the public officials have nothing to hide, right...? Right?
     
  7. goldstar0011

    goldstar0011 Well-Known Member

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    Just crazy!

    Quite common to CCTV around properties, what it it catches someone? Will they get prosectued?
     
  8. Fishlock

    Fishlock .o0o.

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    You can record the Police just as much as the Police regularly record you. There have been many an occassion where it has back fired on people and they have had their phones/cameras seized for prolonged periods of time.

    As for that link above, it is almost two years old and a huge amount of the terrorism legislation is being changed so at present time it is only applicable in specific locations.
     
  9. Ljs

    Ljs Well-Known Member

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    A friend of mine took quite alot of nice photos of the police in Manchester, can't quite remember the event but it looked like a mini riot.

    The Met found him on Flickr and actually asked if they could use his photos, for promo stuff I guess. They didn't seem too bothered that he had actually taken them.
     
  10. BRAWL

    BRAWL Well-Known Member

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    Some won't. some of them can get very arsey very quickly about it. The thing is, they can't touch you and need a warrant to take the camera off you.
     
  11. Fishlock

    Fishlock .o0o.

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    This isn't America, you don't need a warrant. If we have grounds to take it we can, but if we don't, we won't.

    And on that note, wouldn't you get the arse if I turned up at your workplace and started taking pictures of you for no reason?
     
  12. smc8788

    smc8788 ...at least I have chicken

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    Not if I worked in a public place, no. Even then, I may not like it but I would still realise there's little I could do about it.
     
  13. VipersGratitude

    VipersGratitude Well-Known Member

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    Ah, with what fragrance the noble lie doth seduce me...
     
  14. sp4nky

    sp4nky BF3: Aardfrith WoT: McGubbins

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    I don't see why I should. You (policemen in general) take photos of me going about the rest of my lawful business, e.g. when I'm driving my car, going shopping in town, etc. Why should I mind you turning up at my work and doing the same?
     
  15. Fishlock

    Fishlock .o0o.

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    Okay, that's why we constantly have people call us because strangers are photographing other people/properties in public... A huge amount of the public have a problem being photographed without their consent.

    Sorry? Are you calling me a liar? At least back up your accusation with some proof...

    The only time Police take photos of someone is for evidence gathering. Eg. Riots, football matches, terrorism, etc. I don't know what the bloody hell you are talking about when you say we photograph you shopping...

    Surely you don't think that the Police own and run the CCTV cameras in the towns?
     
  16. VipersGratitude

    VipersGratitude Well-Known Member

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  17. supermonkey

    supermonkey Deal with it

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    An honest question here, because I'm looking at this from across the pond. You say that you constantly get calls because people don't like strangers taking pictures of them in public places. What is the typical police response to that sort of call?
     
  18. Fishlock

    Fishlock .o0o.

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    Honestly? The Police would struggle to find an Officer to attend for about 3-4 hours, by which time the person in question is long gone.

    If we did turn up, we'd be asking questions as to why they were photographing said person/property and probably write up an intelligence report so that the Police and other agencies can be aware. If it's that important.

    We quite rightly have very few power to deal with things like this.
     
  19. VipersGratitude

    VipersGratitude Well-Known Member

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    Except when the plaintiff is an officer themselves, in which case they can invoke any law they like (the vaguest and broadest reaching being the terrorism laws) leaving the onus on the defendant to prove thier innocence against the accusation. The problem is that the officer can make punitive measures before wrongdoing is proven, which is very convenient if it is, in fact, the officer who is operating outside the law. An abuse of legislation potentially allows an authoritarian figure to control the transparency and accountability of his or her actions.

    Thats why people are scared of this law. Your personal integrity aside, there is no denying it could easily be used as a means of authoritarian subjugation.
     
  20. Fishlock

    Fishlock .o0o.

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    All I can say is that you obviously spend too much time on the internet, believing everything the media states.

    Oh by the way, you still haven't presented me with any kind of evidence to back the accusations you make.
     

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