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News First commercial quantum computer demoed

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by WilHarris, 15 Feb 2007.

  1. WilHarris

    WilHarris Just another nobody Moderator

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  2. oasked

    oasked Stuck in the Mud

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    You do realise that absolute zero is at -273.15°C...
     
  3. specofdust

    specofdust Banned

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    Great news, the power of these things are just looking to blow regular computers out of the water, and unleash more power to us home users(in time) than we could ever want or need. However the tech is young and will need an absolute tonne of development before it's going to be doing much I imagine.

    Not to mention the significant technical problems in a home user chilling their CPU down to 0.15 degrees centigrade above 0 Kelvin(0 kelvin = absolute zero, there ain't no colder then that, and time tends to stop there).
     
  4. Phil Rhodes

    Phil Rhodes Hypernobber

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    Theoretical physics?

    OK - what am I not seeing here - we have to make giant advances in theoretical physics so as to be able to make a quantum processor, which will allow us to make giant advances in theoretical physics.

    Er, marvellous. I think.

    Technological singularity, anyone?

    Phil
     
  5. _DTM2000_

    _DTM2000_ New Member

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    Let's just hope it doesn't become self aware. :eeek: :D
     
  6. g3n3tiX

    g3n3tiX Active Member

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    too ?



    Although this technology is considered at its beginning, it looks promising.
     
  7. Darkedge

    Darkedge New Member

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    Well not quite as cut and dried as you think - Quantum computers will not replace traditional computers but will be useful in some areas - they work in a totally different manner and the problems of inference is massive that may mean more than 16bit may not be possible.
    Even the company that built this one has said it may actually be a digital computer that behaves very oddly not a quantum one, so don;t start going all paranoid or techlusty over Ai's or anything just yet.
     
  8. BlueDemon

    BlueDemon New Member

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    As oasked pointed out, -273 degrees centigrade is nigh on absolute zero. I can't think of a way of reaching such low-low temperatures, as machinery simply falls apart when chilled to such extremes. Even then, it would most definitely not be viable on a commercial level.
     
  9. r4tch3t

    r4tch3t hmmmm....

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    These would be quite useful (once they get some decent processing power) for use in places like CERN, JET, and such similar places, as they already have the ability to cool it down that far, and they are researching stuff that a quantum computer would be great for.
    What happens if you stick your finger in it?
     
  10. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    Space isn't cold...

    Sounds err...confusing.
     
  11. boggsi

    boggsi New Member

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    absence of thermal energy = cold, background microwaves in deep space ~ 3K. cold enough in my books!
     
  12. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    Well seeing as there is mostly nothing in space aside from the odd planet or two. I'd say it's more no temperature, rather than "cold". Cold doesn't really exist either, it just means, a low temperature, a low thermal energy, if there is no thermal energy, there is no heat of any kind, so there can't be any "cold". Stick something like a nebula there, and then there is a mass, there is thermal energy, so it is "cold".
     
  13. Fod

    Fod what is the cheesecake?

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    you're either being deeply philosophical or a complete ****. lack of heat == cold.
     
  14. randosome

    randosome Banned

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    gotta love how bit tech articles digress so :p

    Heat is just particles moving, the more the particles move (or vibrate) the hotter something is
    Therefore, cold is in fact particles moving less, and at absolute 0, the particles stop moving altogether (even at very cold temperatures, they are moving slowly)
    In space heat (or the energy) just dissipates, everything loses its energy in space so it seems "cold"

    I do have to wonder how they managed to achieve such a low temperature though, i thought something that cold was still impossible for humans
    Also, when your measuring atoms and such, wouldn't you want them to be moving ?
    Also, technically wouldn't this mean the hotter a quantum chip is, the faster it could (theoretically) run
     
  15. jezmck

    jezmck Well-Known Member

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    <pedant>You mean 'Celsius'</pedant>
     
  16. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    Exactly, in space, or at least in most of space where there are no particles, a complete vacuum, there can be no particles vibrating, no particles storing thermal energy. So it's not that theres a low temperature, there is NO temperature.

    Cold is a completely subjective term, something CANNOT be just described as cold scientifically, you can say space is colder than my fridge, implying my fridge has a higher temperature than space, but just saying my fridge is cold doesn't make sense.
     
  17. DeX

    DeX Mube Codder

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    Veles, space isn't a complete vacuum. Interstellar space has about 1 hydrogen atom ber cm{param}. Even in the loneliest parts of the universe between the galaxies where everything would be pitchblack you still find a proton or electron per m{param}. In any case the reason that space has a temperature of around 3K is not because of these particles but because of background microwave radiation. This is the remenants of the big bang "cooling off" and no matter where you are in space you can't escape it.
     
  18. r4tch3t

    r4tch3t hmmmm....

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    From what I understand (haven't read wikipedia yet, will get round to it sometime) Quantum computing measures extremely small changes in the atoms, so if it was at say room temperature, the atoms would be moving so much, that they couldn't properly measure it.
     
  19. Veles

    Veles DUR HUR

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    Even so, the energy of a wave isn't thermal energy? But then, wave particle duality, etc. so I guess it's thermal energy as well. However, the statement that space isn't cold is still true, but by a different argument :p

    But anyway, if you want to go out on an EVA you need a cooling suit not a heating suit. But thats something different entirely.
     
  20. brumster

    brumster New Member

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    Sorry to drag this back to the article but has the hardware been independently examined? Seems like hype to me.
     
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