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Other First Signs Of PCIe 4.0

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by silk186, 19 Sep 2017.

  1. silk186

    silk186 Derp

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    I finally see an article with Intel talking about PCIe 4.0 but can't really follow what it is talking about.
    PCIe will be great for consumers that want an Intel platform but don't want to pay big for more lanes. It M.2, GPU and other ports taking all the lanes a move to 4.0 would be great for those of us that don't want to go down the path of an X299 or similar chipset. It should also allow for faster M.2 drives and 300w GPU without a power cable. It may also have other benefits I'm not aware of.

    Intel displayed a laptop bearing a 10nm Cannon Lake processor earlier this year, but it displayed a 10nm Cannon Lake wafer at TMD and unveiled details of its new "Falcon Mesa" FPGA. Interestingly, Intel's 10nm Falcon Mesa comes bearing the PCIe 4.0 interface. We recently caught up with the PCI-SIG at Hot Chips, and while the organization indicated that PCIe 4.0 is finally almost ready for prime time, it could not share expected deployment timelines for major vendors (such as Intel and AMD).

    Although the Falcon Mesa FPGA isn't destined for the desktop PC in any fashion, it is encouraging to see Intel bring the interface to the 10nm platform. It also implies we might see it debut on 10nm desktop processors. We've waited seven years for the new interface, but we might have to wait for yet another, as Intel's 10nm products are widely predicted to make their debut next year.

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  2. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    I'm more interest in OCuLink than just a bandwidth-bump, and that still seems to be MIA for the consumer sector.
     
  3. silk186

    silk186 Derp

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    OCuLink sounds interesting. I never used eSATA so it don't think I will use OCuLink considering we have USB 3.1 and TB
     
  4. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

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    It's more for internal usage replacing the card-edge connector (and in-PCB traces) than any sort of external interface. e.g. instead of having an ATX sized board to get multiple expansion slots, you have an ITX sided board with multiple OCuLink connectors, and place GPUs wherever is convenient for the case design.
     
  5. silk186

    silk186 Derp

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    That sounds interesting.
     
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