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Cooling fluid xp or mct-5

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Pie_uk, 9 May 2006.

  1. Pie_uk

    Pie_uk British beef, in Britain

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    ok i am going to order a water cooling system tonite and i want to use a non conductive substance (i have the worst luck )

    so fluid xp is £20 for a bottle (eek) or MCT-5 which is £12.90 (few)

    i am tempted to go with mct-5 but it dosnt mention its "life" . fluid xp can be used for years without changing it bu mct-5 dosnt say

    anyway anyhelp will be good


    the water cooling kit i will be purchasing is the alpha cool entry kit £60

    tell you what ill use the :search:
     
    Last edited: 9 May 2006
  2. dfhaii

    dfhaii internets

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    Thanks for telling us. As for coolant I reccomend using sand.
     
  3. MrBadidea

    MrBadidea New Member

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    Acutually, I've heard a few people have been experimenting with Petrol in their cooling loops; some very interesting results too!
     
  4. ArsoN

    ArsoN New Member

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    I've been dabbling in petrol cooling lately. Diesel can work, but the cooling properties of petrol are alot better, beats water hands down.

    So I put a vote down to petrol.
     
  5. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Now now, we all know ethanol is far superior than water and petrol. :rolleyes:
     
  6. kiljoi

    kiljoi I *am* a computer king.

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    Mercury tbh. Just make sure there's some small holes in the loop to relieve the built up pressure.
     
  7. ArsoN

    ArsoN New Member

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    Have you tried chlorine additives? I run 30% chlorine in my petrol, great for killing bacteria/floaties/little nasty creatures in your loop.

    I might try ethanol one day, but it's a bit risky for me.
     
    Last edited: 9 May 2006
  8. Spaceraver

    Spaceraver Ultralurker

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    Bah, ive been using copper grease for quite some time now, you dont even need a pump as the thermal resistance is so low i get below ambient temps even oced my comp 50% :naughty:
     
  9. Pie_uk

    Pie_uk British beef, in Britain

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    Mercury? you being serious , that weighs alot.

    petrol? could do but it would probably catch fire or stink to much.

    i have heard cooking oil has been used with good results

    dfhaii : the only time sand should be used is when your at the beach playing sand castles. TOOL
     
  10. KayinBlack

    KayinBlack Currently Rebuilding

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    Since there seem to be a lot of ridiculous statements, i'll offer help.

    Ethanol/methanol/gasoline(petrol) HAVE been used, they're not completely pulling your leg, and the advantage is the loss of 40% of the weight, but they are less thermally efficient. Water has a thermal efficiency of 1, so if your scale starts with water, hard to improve.

    Sand or mercury? Heh.

    MCT-5 is a mostly ethylene glycol based fluid, and at first it had problems separating and destroying systems. Danger Den actually pulled it for a while, it was so bad.

    Fluid XP is mostly water, as ModSquad found out while doing Soylent Green, and while less conductive than water, it is still water. Hard to improve on the tried and true.

    If you're looking for a truly nonconductive coolant, mineral oil (works for submersion), Midel 7030, or hydrofluoroether work. The last, also as perfluoroether, is available under the name Fluorinert, and Nexxo is using it in his loop as we speak. InertX I believe is the name of the place that recycles old flourinert, and sells it for basically dirt cheap. If anyone can correct this last part please do so, but I've looked a LOT at cooling alternatives. Just thought I'd share.
     
  11. Hazza

    Hazza New Member

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    AFAIK, water with an additive (xerex or whatever) is better than most alcohols or hydrocarbons, either due to heat capacity or density. (ie, mercury might take away the heat nicely, but it's not the easiest thing to pump.) Also, have a think about industrial practise, watercooling is fairly often used, but they tend to use distilled or de-ionised water and an additive. 90% water 10% methanol is sometimes used in water-injection in cars for intercooling, though you have to be careful, because it corrodes things apparently.

    I would agree with KayinBlack. Personally, I'd go for flourinert if you're wanting an inert coolant, but I don't know how cheap "dirt cheap" is. :rolleyes: Flourinert should give you pretty good performance too. Maybe if you ask Nexxo he'll know more about how it compares to water.
     
  12. Shadowed_fury

    Shadowed_fury Active Member

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    Just use damn Deionised water + 5% Zerex. How hard is that?
     
  13. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    PIE_UK insists on using something non-conductive... otherwise distilled water and Zerex are the brew of choice.

    Fluorinert is the only really non-conductive coolant available (Fluid XP still conducts very high voltages and can short out your PSU. Then again, if you actually manage to get coolant in your PSU, watercooling your PC may not be your biggest challenge...).

    It is 1.78 time heavier than water, but a loop does not take much in any case so that's no big deal. It expands a bit more when warm, but again I found that not to be an issue in practice. It has very low viscosity. This is great in terms of making good contact with the block and thermal transfer, but if there is a leak in your system, it will find it. Moreover, it evaporates rapidly in the open air, so you cannot use it in a bong and should only be applied in a closed loop.

    Evaporation and low viscosity in combination means that if there is a very slowly dripping leak, you may never locate it. Watch those levels carefully when running it for the first few weeks. Those big molecules however mean that it will not slowly evaporate through porous silicone tubing like water can do.

    In terms of performance, it does about a degree or so worse than distilled water. On the flipside you get truly fill-and-forget coolant that lasts the lifetime of your machine, and never needs draining, topping up or cleaning, causes no corrosion or sludge and in case of a catastrophic leak will not fry your expensive hardware. Think of the high price as insurance.

    Get it in the UK through Acota Ltd., and in the U.S. reclaimed (to high purity), for a relative bargain via TMC Industries.
     
  14. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit No longer the other Brett.

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    Well you say non conductive, in reality water is non conductive, it's only the impurities in water that cause it to conduct.
    So if you can get pure water, and then intruduce no impurities your sorted. :)

    Just use distilled water and be carefull.
     
  15. Pie_uk

    Pie_uk British beef, in Britain

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    ok thank you very much for all that information :)

    nexxo can you tell me where to get some Fluorinert ?

    i have tried to find inertx but i think they stopped producing it.

    they good points as somebody mentioned is that its a no fuss method of water cooling, since cleaning etc isnt required which suits me down to the ground.
     
  16. hitman012

    hitman012 Active Member

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  17. Pie_uk

    Pie_uk British beef, in Britain

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  18. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    Perfection costs. But you need no more than 2 kg.
     
  19. Hazza

    Hazza New Member

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    What the hell is Certonal FC40??
    It sounds like Flourinert, and you can buy it in '1 kilos' so can save some money (if you're only going to need 2kg). Would that be ok?
     
  20. stev

    stev New Member

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    If your concerned to use a non-conductive substance for coolant, what are you using for a non-conductive substance for thermal grease? The standard WC'ing staple of AS5 isn't a non-conductive substance. Shin-Etsu MicroSI G-751 or any of their newer thermal greases are non-conductive and are OEM for AMD, Sun Microsystems, Intel, Apple etc.
     
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