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News GNU/Linux hit by glibc security vulnerability

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 17 Feb 2016.

  1. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  2. yuusou

    yuusou Well-Known Member

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    glibcgate! glibcbleed! glibcoodle! Is there a mediatic name for this yet?
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    If there isn't, I'm putting 'GlibCrack' in the hat.
     
  4. jewelie

    jewelie Ancient geek, newbie to BT

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    Hmmmm.... Is this only an issue using SSH or does the glibc bug propegate in such a way that it causes practical security issues on all glibc-based devices, whether or not SSH is installed? I'm thinking particularly about routers/modems in particular
     
  5. leexgx

    leexgx CPC hang out zone (i Fix pcs i do )

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    routers are especially a problem as they are rarely updated or never (lack any updates)
     
  6. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    If something uses glibc's DNS resolution, it's vulnerable. Thankfully, there are mitigations: it's not easy to exploit, it's even harder to exploit in a manner that executes code rather than just crashes the system, and most embedded devices don't use glibc 'cos it's a beast. While there *are* routers/firewalls/etc that use glibc, they're in the minority; most use uClibc, 'cos it's smaller. Likewise, anything that has its own DNS resolution code, even if it uses glibc for everything else, is safe.

    You can also protect a system without upgrading glibc (if you want to, though the proper fix is of course to upgrade glibc) by filtering DNS queries with a firewall or dnsmasq or similar.
     

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