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A/V Good moniter speakers for xx mass

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by fof gwada, 13 Dec 2004.

  1. fof gwada

    fof gwada What's a Dremel?

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  2. |I.H|

    |I.H| What's a Dremel?

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    IMO, dont really think they are that good, in the reviews they say that the sound is resonable and flat, so i guess they are not that good. :idea:
     
  3. Shadowed_fury

    Shadowed_fury Minimodder

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    Get 2.1's at least nowadays.
    Though i guess it depends on your budget.
     
  4. penski

    penski BodMod

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    No. Don't.

    He wants to listen to music.

    Unless you're spending a lot of money, your money will be better spent on a home hifi amp and stereo speakers.

    *n
     
  5. Shadowed_fury

    Shadowed_fury Minimodder

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    oops, ok.
    haven't used a hifi for ages, didn't think of that.
     
  6. fof gwada

    fof gwada What's a Dremel?

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    when your talking about those hifi amp and stereo speakers are they for the computer? i only listen to music on the computer
     
  7. djtitan

    djtitan What's a Dremel?

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    if your doing remixing or just mixing for that matter, they are decent, but for any decent sound quality, look elsewhere. Monitors are sweet if you are in the music business, but anything less that 500 is not really worth buying because the sound quality is just not there.
     
  8. penski

    penski BodMod

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    Yup - my PC is connected to a home hifi amp and stereo speakers.

    I dunno about the state of play where you are...I'm sure there will be someone relatively local to you on the forums who would be able to recommend an amp/speaker combination for the money.

    With regards to monitors being only for music production, they are designed to be completely flat in response so that you can set levels correctly. The monitors you linked to wouldn't be as good as a pair that had an external amp as the fact that one of the speakers has an amp inside it will affect its tonal qualities - You wouldn't get balanced stereo.

    I use my home stereo speakers for a lot of music work and they sound great but when it comes to final mixing and fine detail work, I use my Beyerdynamic DT-931s (headphones).

    *n
     
  9. fof gwada

    fof gwada What's a Dremel?

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    how much would that be to get it all hooked up on my computer
     
  10. penski

    penski BodMod

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    You're in the US, yeah?

    I'm afraid I'm in the UK so I'm not familiar with pricing/product availability where you are.

    All you need to do Is take the line out from your soundcard and put it into the line in on your amp. Then connect your speakers and away you go.

    Then, should you wish, you can add a CD player later.

    *n
     
  11. fof gwada

    fof gwada What's a Dremel?

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    i don't have a amp, soundcard or speakers like your talking about
     
  12. dom_

    dom_ --->

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    all soundcards have an audio out of some sort, 3.5mm jack is normal you can get a lead that converts to phono which is the normal amp connection
     
  13. penski

    penski BodMod

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    Just noticed you have a PSI quote in your sig...

    Oddly enough, I have a Bill Hicks quote in mine that PSI sampled on one of the B sides of the Genius Single. Pow.

    *n
     
  14. SteveyG

    SteveyG Electromodder

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    On the other hand, the amplifiers inside monitor speakers are designed specifically for the drivers and enclosure. They often have separate So you'll end up with a better flat response than a separate amp and speakers could provide, providing you spend enough money...

    edit. Just realised what you meant. They don't have an amplifier in each cabinet, so they won't sound quite as good as they should.

    Spend more money and get a separate amp and speakers, or buy some monitors with an amplifier in each cabinet. Fostex make some good monitors.
     
  15. dom_

    dom_ --->

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    how can an amp inside the speaker be any good?
    even top end speakers move the crossover outside the cabinet, i have never ever seen any decent speakers with an amp in.
     
  16. Shadowed_fury

    Shadowed_fury Minimodder

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    I thought i recognised it! PSI are great :D
     
  17. micb

    micb Minimodder

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    What is your budget?

    Penski is right 2.1 systems are not very good.

    A set of decent seperates bookshelf/standmount speakers run from an external amplifier can sound lovely.
     
  18. SpeedFreak

    SpeedFreak What's a Dremel?

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    If you want decent quality active monitors at a reasonable price, take a look at the KRK Rokit series, or failing that, some Tannoy reveal actives
     
  19. Feline

    Feline What's a Dremel?

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    Actually, they mean the EQ curve was reasonably flat, which is a very good thing. The flatter the EQ curve, the more accurately the sound will be reproduced. These monitors are meant to be used as reference monitors in recording studio setups, and you want the flattest EQ possible in your monitors so that your mix will sound good whether it's played back on a hifi home stereo, or through a mono TV speaker. You can mix audio on any set of speakers, but if they don't have a flat frequency response, chances are good that the mix will sound great on your speakers and crap on another set.

    Sorry, I took Audio Engineering for two years. I wasn't trying to flame you or anything. I sold these monitors (actually, their predecessor model) when I worked at Guitar Center a few years ago. For general home-listening, they're great, but for studio work, I'd only use them as reference monitors and not for final mixdown.

    As for power amps inside monitors: Most of the time, it's actually better than having a separate power amp, because the internal power amps are designed specifically for that monitor and the cabinet it's housed in. However, if only one of the monitors has the power amp and the other monitor is just the speakers, the sound won't be balanced, as the cabinets are going to resonate differently. As far as I can tell, only one of the monitors in this setup has a power amp in it, and therefore could cause one cabinet to resonate and sound slightly different than the other (that is, unless, M-Audio's engineers took this into account when designing the monitors.) If you have a music store in your area, I'd see if they carry them and then go and check them out in person.

    If you really want studio monitors to use with your PC, I can recommend a few different brands, but unfortunately most quality studio monitors get expensive pretty fast (for instance, one Genelec 8050A monitor costs around $1750 USD. A pair runs almost $4000! Granted, Genelec's are the cream of the crop when it comes to monitors, but you get the idea.) However, you can get something like the Event Tuned Reference 6 monitors for a reasonable price, and they'll sound much better than the M-Audio's. They still run about $400 if you get a pair, though.

    Honestly, unless you plan on doing any audio recording or mixdown, I'd recommend something like Logitech or Klipsch's. Around here, the Klipsch ProMedia 2.1 THX-certified system runs about $150, and the 5.1 system runs about $350 (US dollars.) Logitech's got several very nice setups that sound great and are very affordable.

    Either way, audio quality is such a subjective thing, that I'd recommend you listen to any speaker or monitor before you buy it. You'd probably be surprised at what you can get for $200, but you'd probably also be surprised at what kind of utter crap $800 will get you.
     
  20. micb

    micb Minimodder

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    While you are striving towards the right idea your first paragraph is not quite correct.

    You want a flat "freqency response" possible this does not always mean a flat EQ curve as the EQ curve may have to be like a rollercoster in shape to get our system flat.......

    Put basicly our environment (the area we play sound in) totally shapes how we hear the sound.

    All speakers and subwoofers have a response curve this is the frequencies the driver/enclosure play and how loud they are played.

    Anechoic means no echos or basicly no reflections.

    Refelections of sound off objects can increase output of some frequnecies and cancel them out at others.

    There is such a thing as an anechoic chamber which is used to measure the frequnecy response of speaker when there is not any refelections which can boost or cut the response of a driver and enclosure.

    Now a good speaker monitor should be designed will be flat as possible in a Aneconic environment.

    Now if we took this speaker and put it in a house neer a wall or corner we will get reinforcement and loss of the trebble, midrange and bass from the room as we have refelections comming together (and reflections interfering).

    The room dimentions Length, Width and Height will shape which frequnecies are boosted, the overall size of the room will often ditermin how much gain you get.

    Now an EQ can be used to correct (cut and boost) the now skewed frequnecy response in room to put it back to flat.

    Now this is great for mixing music, but it is not always what we want for day to day music listening. A system with a totally flat FR can be boring and lifesless. Our hearing is not flat we often have to have to reinforce the low end to make up for out reduced hearing for the down low (80hz - 20hz).

    I would not reccomend an all in one 2.1 system for music, they tend to have weak midrange/midbass and over bloated upperbass.

    A decent set of stereo speakers run from a decent integrated amplifier or Pre/Pro/Poweramplifier combination often can sound far better.

    As you say it is down to personal preference.
     

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