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Hardware Has 'Pin Burn-out' Returned on the LGA1155 Socket?

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by arcticstoat, 17 Jan 2011.

  1. arcticstoat

    arcticstoat New Member

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  2. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    [extreme] overclocking may damage your kit... who'd have thought...
     
  3. mi1ez

    mi1ez Active Member

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    ^+1

    I would say this is nothing to worry about for the vast majority of buyers/users/overclockers.
     
  4. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    To those who think this is a serious issue - no, it is not. You can achieve this by overtightening the cooler on board, which makes the board bend a little, which makes some pins not having contact with CPU, which means same current going through fewer pins, which means higher current per pin. Combine that with extreme overclocking where you use a lot higher voltage than the safe limit, and you got a deadly combination. And what a surprise, LN2, dry ice and other cooling methods often use mounting systems which tend to bend the board. Even in P55 time, the issue was the same.

    Simply don't overtighten your cooler on your board and you won't have burn pins.
     
  5. Snips

    Snips I can do dat, giz a job

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    I wasn't even aware of the 1156 problem! Not concerned by this at all. If you extreme overclock then you already know this could be a possibility. It's one of these warnings you get like ....Don't run with scissors or Don't use virtual reality goggles while standing at the edge of a cliff.
     
  6. Spraduke

    Spraduke Lurker

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    I've got the UD4 and whilst my overclock is a measly 4 GHZ (2500k but still much faster than I could get my E8400) and I havent changed the voltages so all seems well so far.

    It scared the bejesus out of me when I fitted the CPU because the retention plate seemed very stiff and it made a nice grating noise (assume the pins flexing) but all seems well.
     
  7. dunx

    dunx ITX is where it's at !

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    Voltage isn't the issue, it's the current ^2 that causes the heating...
     
  8. feathers

    feathers Well-Known Member

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    Some people will always be too scared to overclock. I know people who think overclocking should only be done without voltage raising (duh!). The same people who believe that applying thermal paste to a CPU is a complicated and risky business. The world is full of muppets.
     
  9. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Yes, but increasing voltage increases current as well, or in other words, Ohm's law. So does the non-perfect contact, which makes less pins take more of the current, and once you cross the maximum current per pin, you get these nasty burns :).
     
  10. V3ctor

    V3ctor Tech addict...

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    I have my 2500K at 4.8ghz with 1.35v, that voltage doesn't seem that big to do these things... Better downclock, just in case...
     
  11. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

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    Not everyone wants to overclock. I know people who think overclocking can only be done by raising voltage (duh!). Some people believe that thermal paste is a distateful and irrelevant task that if not done correctly doesn't actually matter. The world has some muppets in it, and their fingers will at some point get burned and/or covered in excess thermal paste!

    And some people remove rev limiters, over-rev their engines to get more power at the lights then wonder why their oil suddenly looks like a latte but smells rather nasty!

    :)
     
  12. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Of course 1.35V is nothing. But extreme overclocking means 1.7V and higher, plus as i said, most times it comes with overtightened coolers, which results in less pins making contact with the CPU itself. And that means that if some pins don't have contact with the CPU, then the rest must deliver more current. And this way it's easy to go over specs of those pins.

    And by the way, the burned pins are those which work correctly.
     
  13. wuyanxu

    wuyanxu still wants Homeworld 3

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    it's those Foxconn sockets again.....

    nothing to worry about for normal consumers. i have a first generation Foxconn LGA1156 socket, and i inspect the socket everytime i re-mount the cooler, inspected last week while installing the new PSU. zero problem.

    just avoid the said boards, UD4 and UD7 it seems. buy Asus? :D
     
  14. lworbey

    lworbey New Member

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    Err, not quite...

    The CPU will require a certain amount of power to run and as P = I x V if you increase the voltage then the current goes down for the same amount of power. That said I don't know enough about the internals of a CPU to know if increasing the voltage makes the CPU use more power overall but in general increasing the voltage decreases current...
     
  15. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    There is one minor flaw in your logic - maybe it will surprise you, but when you increase the CPU voltage, that means you increase it's power consumption too. And because resistance doesn't usually change much, that also means higher current at higher voltage.
     
  16. lworbey

    lworbey New Member

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    Yeah hence why I said
    as I wasn't sure how the CPU would deal with the increased voltage.

    Sorry the section of my brain where ohms law was burnt to kicked in and told me it didn't sound right hehe! Still good to know, thats my learning done for the day :)
     
  17. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Well, there is something in the new CPUs which limits the turbo modes if you go over the power consumption or temperature limits, but the fact is that this all comes down to overtightening the cooler and bending the board. Even if the bend is small, it's enough to keep few pins from having contact with the CPU itself.
     
  18. Glix

    Glix Left Thumb Stick in the mud.

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    So we learn that moving the pins to the motherboard has it's own crop of disadvantages, mainly that it means if your board flexes for whatever reason, you can fry your cpu/mobo.

    So does this mean those big heavy blocks (w/c included ie bad piping) are bad for the long term? :>
     
  19. t5kcannon

    t5kcannon Member

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    haha yeah, breaking news :D
     
  20. maverik-sg1

    maverik-sg1 Member

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    I cant agree with this - dry ice, LN2 and phase coolers all cool the chip lower than -20degrees Celsius - to the point a motherboard needs to be properly insulated (front and back) around the cpu area - I doubt anything gets hotter than +10degs, even with an exaggerated warped board.

    Anyway to get back to the socket issues- I do recall early conroe boards having the cheapest of the nastiest of sockets, whereas even pressure from 'normal' coolers and or mild voltage increases (resulting in more current that created higher temps through the pins) would cause the pins to bend/collapse/burnout.

    Some etailors in their infinite wisdom <cough>ARIA.CO.UK<cough> would even say 'you must of put the cpu in wrong' and reject RMA instead of realising the issue at hand.

    Once I even had a board delivered, sealed and brand new - it complete with bent socket pins at no extra cost... what a plus >.<

    I sincerely hope that the lack of customer satisfaction caused by the nature of burying ones head in the sand does not rear it's ugly head again.
     
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