1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Hardware Has 'Pin Burn-out' Returned on the LGA1155 Socket?

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by arcticstoat, 17 Jan 2011.

  1. Ross1

    Ross1 New Member

    Joined:
    15 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    194
    Likes Received:
    5
    Some etailors in their infinite wisdom <cough>ARIA.CO.UK<cough> would even say 'you must of put the cpu in wrong' and reject RMA instead of realising the issue at hand.

    -> I had that exact problem with aria, never bought from them since.
     
  2. Azayles

    Azayles New Member

    Joined:
    6 Jan 2008
    Posts:
    399
    Likes Received:
    6
    How come it's the pins which burn out, not the finer, more delicate bond wires in the chip itself? or am I missing something here?
    Surely pin burn out would be more due to a poorly seated chip, which is having intermittent contact with a voltage and arcing, which is causing the burning, and not due to shear quantity of current flow?
     
  3. greigaitken

    greigaitken Member

    Joined:
    26 Aug 2009
    Posts:
    399
    Likes Received:
    2
    Azayles - good question. i think it's a mixture of contact with poor integrity mixed with high power useage. the wires inside cpu will have a stable high area of contact.

    The amount of current per mm^3 of pin isnt that big compared to say that on the pci strip on a graphics card so the problem cant be too much current travelling through the pin.

    An impractical but theoretical solution would be to have some sort of high conductance fluid applied to each pin to ensure maximum contact area.
    Of course since there are no problems under moderate overclocking then nobody needs to do anything and be happy your mb works just fine.
     
  4. centy

    centy DFI Nutter

    Joined:
    20 May 2007
    Posts:
    58
    Likes Received:
    0
    The image shows what pops into my mind when I consider putting VTT voltage higher than VCore
     
  5. thehippoz

    thehippoz New Member

    Joined:
    19 Dec 2008
    Posts:
    5,780
    Likes Received:
    174
    yeah that's a lot of it right there.. same people are scared of linux

    but on the other extreme- there's guys in linux who will never see the great things they can accomplish in windows with super expensive programs xD.. they are just as bad if not worse cause they become neckbeards
     
  6. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

    Joined:
    6 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,428
    Likes Received:
    39
  7. VaLkyR-Assassin

    VaLkyR-Assassin Member

    Joined:
    16 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wish Intel would go back to the older style socket that AMD still uses with the pins on the chip itself - that design by default doesn't have this issue.
     
  8. VaLkyR-Assassin

    VaLkyR-Assassin Member

    Joined:
    16 Feb 2009
    Posts:
    98
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm pretty sure the majority of etailers have the same policy tbh. And it's obviously a major cause for concern for us buyers. It might be down to the motherboard manufacturers refusing the reject boards though.
     
  9. Xtrafresh

    Xtrafresh It never hurts to help

    Joined:
    27 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    2,999
    Likes Received:
    100
    Look up the fine print, bent pins are not covered by warranty, however unfair this may or may not be. BURNT pins due to high overclocking will 100% be denied, as it's double-not covered.

    It's a storm in a glass of water. They think they read something similar, and cry out the first relevant name they think could be the issue, and forget to check anything else.

    From the blog, it seems only one of his two samples has the damage, so he is claiming to have discovered structural problems on the basis of one defect. That alone is a load of horsedung already, and looking at the pictures, i fail to see anything burnt, it's just damaged. He should blame the reviewers that had the board before him, and possibly the PR rep that failed to test the board before sending it, but crying wolf about the whole socket on a structural basis is frankly just unprofessional. Why re-report this on the front page as if it's a genuine concern? We all KNOW the vast majority of the public are impressionable muppets, and they will be telling stories of the sucky foxconn sockets years from now :p
     
  10. maverik-sg1

    maverik-sg1 Member

    Joined:
    18 Aug 2010
    Posts:
    357
    Likes Received:
    1
    Speaking from experience, this was a problem before and could potetniallybe a problem again.

    I have built well over 30 LGA based systems, add into that cpu upgrades and we're talking 40+ in the last 5 or 6yrs. My RMA's have been from boards that have not generated faults immediately after installation, but rather weeks or months after running faultlessly - so then for some pre-pubescent Asshat to tell me that I put the cpu in wrong and this is my problem....it's insulting.

    The worst board for me was the ASUS P5K and in fact like I said previously one of these came with bent pins already......I only knew that because I insepcted it thouroughly prior to use, which then led me to believe that maybe, just maybe, the other faulty boards already had bent pins also? It was not something I thought I really needed to check before.

    If you compare sockets of later LGA775 boards to the earlier P5B or P5W you can see an apparent shift in robustness/quality. Sockets of any kind should be robust enough for the job at hand and it can be done.

    Most of these board promote overclocking and watercooling and some even extreme cooling - so users of these boards are expecting some support if/when something like this happens - at the very least, if a warranty is too flimsy - there should be a focus on offering socket replacements at a reasonable cost (£20 plus shipping) and a fast turnaround (10days).
     
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page