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A/V HDTV too good to be true

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by EK-MDi, 14 Apr 2006.

  1. EK-MDi

    EK-MDi What's a Dremel?

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    Here is a HDTV that I'm looking to buy - Toshiba 42WLT66.
    What I don't understand is, is that if it has a 42" size screen, then how come it has a resolution of 1080. I thought that it's only worth having the 1080 resolution over 720, when the screen is bigger than 50 inches. However, this screen is 42 inches...:thumb:
    And to make things even more hard to believe, this roughly £1800 TV, is able to output progressive scans. I thought you have to pay at least a few thousand quid to have a TV that can output 1080p resolutions... :jawdrop:
    It seems this is just to good to be true! I'm ordering this first thing tomorrow morning, before all the shops are out of stock!:baby::clap:
     
    Last edited: 17 Apr 2006
  2. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    It doesnt expressly say, 1080p, so it's more likely 720p or 1080i.
     
  3. Mister_Tad

    Mister_Tad Will work for nuts Super Moderator

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    If it says 1920x1080, it should be 1920x1080
    There are a few smaller LCDs around these days (seen 1920x1080 on 37" ones as well) that are 1080p

    not a bad deal for a screen like that :thumb:
     
  4. Kaze22

    Kaze22 What's a Dremel?

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    Looks like the real deal, Toshiba perfect for watching BluRays on LOL.
    From the spec it looks like it will do 1080p, mostly only 1366 x 768 HDTVs do 1080i.
    But one problem, it's only got a 800:1 contrast ratio, thats really pathetic for a HDTV, from personal experience a 800:1 contrast LCD TV looks more like a large over priced computer display than an actual TV.
    In the world of LCDs contrast ratio is key, I would say it's even more important than resolution. Most high end LCD TV have a minimum of 2000:1 contrast while some even have 5000:1. Trust me it makes a world of difference whats the point in having high res images when they are washed out and greyish looking.
    So far the Samsung LN-S4092D has the best most vibrant image of all the HDTVs that I've seen. It has 5000:1 contrast.
    If I were you I'd still shop around untill I find one with a better contrast ratio at 2000:1 a least. Other wise it's just nothing more than a really big computer display.
     
  5. cysus

    cysus What's a Dremel?

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    Don't buy it.
    ...it doesn't have HDCP

    There is little point to being 1080p without HDCP. You will not be able to run HD-DVD or Blu-Ray Videos at 1080p without it. Unless you're hooking it upto a PC you won't find anything to play on it at 1080p.
     
  6. cpemma

    cpemma Ecky thump

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    :search:
     
  7. genesisofthesith

    genesisofthesith complete spanner

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    don't all hdmi sockets have to implement hdcp?
     
  8. whisperwolf

    whisperwolf What's a Dremel?

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    yup. would only need to list HDCP compliance if it only had a DVI port on the back. The toshiba link also show the HD ready logo, so it will should HDCP.
     
  9. EK-MDi

    EK-MDi What's a Dremel?

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    OK thanks for your advice guys; I appreciate it. However, about the low "800:1 contrast ratio". Some gadget review sites like CNET said the picture quality is really quite good, but I may need another read-through of that.
    If you really insist that I should keep looking around Kaze22, then I will. It seems things are just never perfect :(.
     
  10. Kaze22

    Kaze22 What's a Dremel?

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    I own both a 800:1 and 3000:1 display.
    A 3000:1 Samsung LCD TV and a 800:1 Ferrari F20.
    Let me explain the difference. 800:1 essentially looks a like a really bright computer display, the colors don't look true the blacks are a very dark grey and the viewing angle is about 170.
    On a 3000:1 the colors look brilliant the blacks are true black just like CRT and the viewing angle is almost 180.
    Basically 800:1 looks like a beefed up LCD display while an 3000:1 looks like a true LCD TV.
    The choice is yours but it's very noticeable.
    As a matter of fact on a 3000:1 display you won't even notice your watching a LCD TV, as the color and contrast is virtually identical to a CRT TV.
     
  11. cysus

    cysus What's a Dremel?

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    While this should be the case, as a practical belief you run into cases where things have HDMI but then no HDCP. I've, in the past, had that understanding and it cost me dearly, $1500US. I wouldn't believe it until I see it. :sigh:
     
  12. Kaze22

    Kaze22 What's a Dremel?

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    HDCP will most likely fade out, seeing as Sony's already taken the initiative to stop HDCP through non resolution tokening in their new BluRay releases (for Columbia, MGM and Sony Pictures). I think eventually other distributors will realize how stupid HDCP really is when people refuse to buy HDCP disks. Seeing as it doesn't even help to stop piracy but simply forces people to buy new TVs.
     
  13. whisperwolf

    whisperwolf What's a Dremel?

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    I was under the impression that Sony pictures had stated they were not going to down res Blur-ray releases if viewed over an analgue/component conection, and this was because Sony did not think the analgue market was all that big. I thought that the HDCP was still in play for digital connection protection, as the HDCP itself does not down res but provide copy protection?
     
  14. Kaze22

    Kaze22 What's a Dremel?

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    Maybe you're right but from what I heard Sony was planning on releasing there films with no HDCP signal protection so the signal can sent over any digital/analog reciever. DVI/HDMI/Component/VGA. I don't think you'll need an HDCP TV to play Sony BluRays via digital or analog connection. I could be wrong, but wasn't the move made to grab a bigger user base with early adopters who don't have HDCP TVs. I know Sony's disks won't use resolution tokening so no down resing, but I don't know if it's the same for both digital and analog signals. We'll need to wait until next month to find out. Maybe it's only component and VGA.
     
  15. whisperwolf

    whisperwolf What's a Dremel?

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    Trying to back chase sony's position as much as possible, it seems that Sony will not implement the "Image Constraint Token" which is the flag that instructs the player to down-res the video signal from its analog component-video. The digital feed will still be protected through AACS.
     

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