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Build Advice High-end gaming PC - build advice

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by alex!, 24 Oct 2010.

  1. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    you no speaka no engli? lol joking,the p.c had a foxconn mother board so it came with a foxconn disk which you use for watching the temp,overclocking the cpu ect
     
  2. adam_bagpuss

    adam_bagpuss Have you tried turning it off/on ?

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    thats not a very good way of overclocking best option is always the bios and using coretemp, speedfan for CPU temps and using prime95 to measure stability and load temps.

    what were the system specs and what speed was it when it went bang. Ive been building PCs for years and overclocking them and never once had a CPU go bang.
     
  3. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    by the way,if anyone is bothered by this and thinks i was being rude,i wasn't but sorry anyway.i was hyper,i had too much sugar lol and i was keen to help a fellow nerdling :p...lol
     
  4. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    was back in 2007/8,it was a foxconn G31 i think with an intel dual core e2200 not sure tho,tryed to dig it out but...i don't think it wanted to lol it was a 2.2ghz cpu and it went to 2.4ghz i think
     
  5. adam_bagpuss

    adam_bagpuss Have you tried turning it off/on ?

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    well im 100% certain it wasnt the overclocking that cause your PC to go bang unless you put some crazy volts through for no reason.

    since E2200 was easily capable of 2.8Ghz+, hell ive got a E2160 running at 3.2Ghz and its been like that for 2 or 3 years nearly.

    sorry to the OP for going off topic
     
  6. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    well whatever it was that caused it,its dead...screw it,i got another one kinda like it,it was running on a 300w tree hugger psu same as this lol and yeah i never thought,this is kind of off topic lol
     
  7. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    Hey guys, thanks for all the advice (and the argueing etc etc) but I will be looking at adding in a 128GB SSD, a 1TB Spinpoint F3 and a second 6870 next month, after reading reviews I realise that two 6870's will be plenty for my gaming needs and if need be I can throw in two more powerful ones further down the line. I will be overclocking the CPU but not to an extreme level, just to around 3.5Ghz-ish. I am completely sold on the Roccat mouse and keyboard despite their price, they just look brilliant! I understand any issues involving the lack of soundcards so I will factor in one for next month :D

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBAHNAbSzYE <- watch this for a video review of a 6870 CF setup.


    Thanks again :D
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2010
  8. JaredC01

    JaredC01 Hardware Nut

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    As with everyone else, going to completely disagree with you on most every part.

    While I will agree that increased heat and more importantly increased voltages will kill a chip faster than originally intended, the headroom on stock voltage with the Intel chips dating back to the Core2 line is so incredibly high that there's no need to increase the voltage in most cases. As an example, my E8400 C2D overclocked to 3.6GHz with ZERO voltage changes. The same is true with my i7 920... Originally 2.66GHz, overclocked to 3.6 once again with ZERO voltage changes. I have very very very minor voltage tweaks to run 100% stable at 3.8GHz for daily use (and this is on a batch number that supposedly doesn't overclock well).

    As for heat, the processor has a built in absolute maximum temperature which, once passed, will automatically throttle the chip. For most of the Intel chips, the maximum is 100*C. Theoretically, anything BELOW that temperature is within proper operating temperatures. Lower is better, however the chip IS MADE to run at any temp up to absolute maximum on a daily basis. As far as overclocking is concerned, 9 times out of 10 running the processor at stock speeds with the stock cooler will result in a higher temperature than an overclocked processor using an aftermarket cooler.

    So long as you're not going for synthetic benchmarks, an overclock at stock voltage on the newer Intel chips should yield as much increased speed as you'd need for daily use. There's very little REAL WORLD difference between running at 3.8GHz and running at 4.0GHz... At best, you'd save a few seconds off whatever project you're working on.

    The new chips really have made overclocking a near-zero-risk affair since there's little to no voltage tweaking required.

    Being one of the guys with CrossfireX enabled on my system, I can honestly say I would rather have a single more powerful card than two cards linked together. Not all games react well to CrossfireX, and there's still issues with micro-stutter in game. Add on top of that the increased power needs for two cards, and the increased heat and noise, and the real-world benefit is reduced.

    I'd say either wait for the successor to the 5870, or pick up a 5870. One 5870 should be powerful enough for any game on high settings @ 1920 x 1200 (or 1080 if you prefer the 16:9 monitors) with zero issues. I ran a single 5870 on my 30" (2560 x 1600) with the majority of the games I play maxed out on everything side AA. If I had to do it all over again, I'd either stick with a single 5870, or pick up a 5970 in place of two individual cards, though that's also for gaming at an 'extreme' resolution.
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2010
  9. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    I have a change of plan, I will buy a single cheap graphics card for the moment, say a HD4870and when the high end ones come out I'll snap one/two of them up for a CF setup, I'll also change the PSU to a 850/1050w if needed.
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2010
  10. JaredC01

    JaredC01 Hardware Nut

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    Check my edit to my last post. ;)
     
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  11. stonedScientist

    stonedScientist Member

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    I haven't read a great deal on the new AMD cards but something to be mindful of would be the heat generated from 2 of these cards in XFire.

    Make sure to have a good case with good airflow and fans as well as a good cpu cooler. From what i've read the Silverstone FT02 (as reviewed on Bit Tech http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cases/2010/08/12/silverstone-ft02r-w-review/1) is a very good case in terms of cooling as long as you keep the wiring tidy. You'll need awesome cooling if you're going to add 2 more cards to make Quad Xfire, perhaps watercooling.

    But personally i'd wait for a single card that matches the performance of 6870's in Crossfire. Benefits of a single card: Less compatibility issues, a lot less heat and noise, more space for better airflow and slightly less power usage are the main ones I can think of.
     
    alex! likes this.
  12. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    You are both right, I shall pick up a cheap HD4870 for £90 and wait until the high-end HD6xxx cards are out and take one of them. For sheer sexy rating with the sleek look of the red/black AMD cards I may swap the case for the FT02 with the red interior.

    Thanks very much ++ Rep
     
  13. stonedScientist

    stonedScientist Member

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    I'm waiting for the 5970 replacement myself ;) Can't wait to see how many rabbits they pull out of the hat for that one :D

    Yeah that FT02 is an awesome looking case with top cooling. Looks even better when it's in front of you :D
     
    Last edited: 25 Oct 2010
  14. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    It sure does, ill change to that instead and pick up a high end AMD card when they come out :D
     
  15. amartin91

    amartin91 New Member

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    i would not get a 6*** series card, they seem fairly slow when compared to the 5870 ....
     
  16. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    i didn't type that warning thing,that was from a website im a member of lol and i just used foxconn(like i did in my old p.c)to overclock the cpu to 2.44 but im still with a stock fan so...yup lol
     
  17. xp-T

    xp-T New Member

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    i don't remeber but have you thought about...nvidia...i personally like the style of the cards if the case has a window
     
  18. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    For hardware I feel that the actual performance/price is more important than the aesthetics of said object. If a motherboard had a picture of Megan Fox on it but was poor I wouldn't buy it. But by the looks of things AMD are on to a winner with the latest release of the HD6xxx range cards. I only take aesthetics and performance into account when the objects will be on show alot, such as the case and peripherals etc. And in my opinion the nvidia cards dont look anywhere near as sleek as the AMD range.
     
  19. urobulos

    urobulos Member

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    I think he meant he had a Foxconn mobo.

    Still, if you are using quality components and proper cooling 4 GHz on an i7 is easy and does provide more CPU power. Thing is I put mine back to stock because 99% of things I use my PC do not suffer from a CPU bottleneck. My usage is pretty much multimedia/office work/browsing/gaming. Gaming is by far my most demanding use and even at stock my CPU rarely goes above 50-60% usage. Still, if you do anything even moderately CPU intensive then with your list components not OCing is borderline criminal.

    As for the high-end gaming part. Depends on how desperate you are to replace your rig, but if you can wait then next month we get the 69xx cards which are the real replacements for the 5850/70 and 5970 series. Though 6870 CF should handle every single game at max details up to 1080p. Single 6870 is definitely not high end though.

    Generally if you are spending so much on a gaming computer (1400+) you should put much more than 200 pounds into your GPU. Truth is, for gaming only, i7 are overkill. Idk, what else you are going to do with your PC, but unless you do some rendering, heavy coding and so on, an i5 would be probably a better choice. Cheaper CPU, cheaper mobo, cheaper RAM. Spend the savings on upgrading the GPU instead or adding a second card.

    In any case, a gaming PC which has 1/7th of its cost spent on graphics is badly balanced imho.
     
  20. alex!

    alex! Kick-ass:Death ratio 93

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    I will not be gaming only, as you should see in the first post in the thread I state many of the things I will be doing with the computer. I am not getting a 6870, I am getting a HD4870 just now and then buying a high end HD6xxx card next month along with various other components. As for the i5 option I am not a fan. Like I said in the first post I would like the computer to be future proof and as the new Hex-Core processors being released Q1/2011 will be using a Socket 1366.

    Alex
     

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