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Electronics High voltage safety precautions

Discussion in 'Modding' started by ChillingSP, 4 May 2009.

  1. ChillingSP

    ChillingSP New Member

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    Hi all,

    for a modding project, I'm going to do some experimentation with high voltage equipment ( transformers, capacitor banks, etc ).

    I was wondering if someone has a link to share with some guidelines or notes about dealing with this dangerous stuff ( I wouldn't want to die because of a spark jump... )

    Thanks

    Stef
     
  2. capnPedro

    capnPedro Hacker. Maker. Engineer.

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    How high are we talking? 240v? 10Kv?
     
  3. ChillingSP

    ChillingSP New Member

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    I refer to the kind of voltages you can find inside tv and microwave oven chassis ( 10 - 30 kV )
     
  4. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

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    Why are you even fiddling around with these excessively dangerous things? Imo if you're asking, you shouldn't be doing it.
     
  5. Smilodon

    Smilodon The Antagonist

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    Just make sure that the equipment you are using is rated for such voltages. (Measuring equipment, cables/insulators and gloves (Yes, use gloves to be sure)).


    You must also be aware that air becomes significantly conductive at these voltages. The rule of thumb is that an arc can jump 1mm per kV. Also make sure that radio noise can't cause any trouble around you (Pacemakers, hearing aids, radio/tv/computer equipment). Sparks put out lots of electrical noise at pretty high levels.

    Krikkit have a good point, though.


    Just be careful, and ALWAYS keep a person in the same room. (To pull you out of a circuit or to call the hospital/morgue)
     
    ElThomsono likes this.
  6. Lorquis

    Lorquis lorquisSpamCount++;

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    Coilguns aren't gonna make themselves!
     
  7. Jozo

    Jozo This is bit-tech

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    Also make sure to check every step you take before you take it.

    It's better to take time and think it over than rush it and bzzzzzzz. :D
     
  8. ChillingSP

    ChillingSP New Member

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    That's the kind of info I'm talking about mate :D. Where can I find more tips like this ? Are there some manuals about HV equipment servicing or similar ?



    You Sir just gave me some nice ideas.
     
  9. Smilodon

    Smilodon The Antagonist

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    Well, they have schools that teach you stuff like that. School isn't just a formality (Even though it may appear so from time to time).

    HV work is actually a pretty specialized field. There is more to it than just knowing what will conduct electricity. HV and HF electricity simply doesn't behave the same as LV/LF electricity.




    I have a story that fits in here quite well:

    My old teacher once figured it would be cool to make a Jacobs ladder (Google it). He extracted a transformer from an old TV, and made the circuits to drive it. During thesting he placed it on a wood table to make sure that the arc didn't "run off".

    As he powered up the ting, the arch followed the tabletop, proceeded TROUGH the table (Wood is a good insulator) and into the metal legs of the table.:worried: After that he threw the whole thing away... hehe
     
  10. Ending Credits

    Ending Credits Bunned

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    Yeah. Lots of people think they are safe in their cars from lightning because they're "insulated" by the rubber tyres but then how did the lightning get to the car in the first place. (Although as I'm, sure many of you know you are safe from lightning strikes within a car just for different reasons.)
     
  11. dan-ere-07

    dan-ere-07 New Member

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    thats true it isnt the tires that save you from the lightning, its the car body acting like a cage so the current will flow around the outside.
     
  12. ChillingSP

    ChillingSP New Member

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