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Bits How PC cases are made: In-Win Factory Tour

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Claave, 7 Jun 2009.

  1. Claave

    Claave You Rebel scum

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  2. BioSniper

    BioSniper New Member

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    Cheers for the write up Rich, always appreciated when stuff like this is done.
    I'd actually quite like to see Lian-Li's plant toured just to see how different it is and how they can afford to charge such eye watering prices :p
     
  3. logan'srun

    logan'srun following the footsteps of giants

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    +1 on Lian Li

    I actually thought this read like they let Nelly do half of it. . .

    But for Taiwan factories, it looks above par and pretty clean. Rich should have gotten some more pics of the safety conditions for the workers and for being a factory of 5-600 ppl, didn't see alot of them in the pics. Was it a Saturday? Did you get to eat lunch in the cafeteria with the workers?
     
  4. DarkLord7854

    DarkLord7854 New Member

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    That was a really cool article :D
     
  5. Turbotab

    Turbotab I don't touch type, I tard type

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    Thanks for the article, always interesting to see how the items that we use are made; any possibility of a processor fab tour in the future? Bindi, who are you going to get to sit on your suitcase, so you can cram in all the goodies that you must be accruing:)
     
  6. DragunovHUN

    DragunovHUN I want to change my name but I also don't

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    Not trying to be an ass but, did anyone proofread this?
     
  7. Yemerich

    Yemerich I can has PERSUADETRON?

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    A pitty there are no movies, but really nice article nonetheless.

    Thanks ;)
     
  8. yodasarmpit

    yodasarmpit No longer the other Brett.

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    Can you specify areas of concern?
    This will allow the team to amend any inaccuracies.
     
  9. CardJoe

    CardJoe Freelance Journalist

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    Three different people, actually. Any typos you point out will be corrected though.
     
  10. sear

    sear Guest

    For some reason, seeing factories and similar always depresses me. At least the workers here don't look entirely unhappy.
     
  11. DragunovHUN

    DragunovHUN I want to change my name but I also don't

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    Gladly. I guess i should have done this sooner, instead of complaining. But it's so much easier to just complain.

    First page:
     
  12. dylAndroid

    dylAndroid is human?

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    I really like seeing factories and manufacturing processes -- thanks for the article!

    Like others, it would be neat to see some other case manufacturers for contrast.

    Out of curiosity, did you get any figures on what the factory costs? It would be interesting to hear some ballpark numbers from them for what their stamping, painting, and other equipment costs up front, as well as what the labor costs are to support a worker there. Part of the reason why I'm wondering this comes from seeing the guy working on dusting & deburring by hand, whereas there are machines that could have been purchased for this task instead. Most likely after factoring in the direct and indirect costs, quality, and whether or not this task bottlenecked the production line, employing the guy made more sense, but I'd like to see their numbers explaining why.

    Also, as for the China vs. Taiwan costs, it may actually be more costly to produce in China. This could show up through quality -- if quality suffers, the company will likely sell fewer cases in the long run, and also have to pay more to address defects in their products. Further, the article suggests that the company believes that the workforce in Taiwan brings a better capability to produce these cases, potentially meaning less cost to train them and possibly less supervision. Then there's also general transaction costs relating to operating in a region -- how much must be payed to the government, what it will cost to reliably get input materials of satisfactory quality supplied, security, etc.

    The truth is that for some situations, going for a cheaper sticker price on labor will cost more. Infact, for products that are done with high automation, it may make more sense to just build a factory somewhere you would think would be expensive, such as in the U.S. Processor manufacturing is a good example of this.
     
  13. C-Sniper

    C-Sniper Stop Trolling this space Ądmins!

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    Any chance of a Lian Li or Coolermaster case factory visit?
     
  14. Javerh

    Javerh Topiary Golem

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    This kind of production looks so old-school nowadays. No signs of lean production or six sigma. And those are old stuff! The fact that a guy is doing deburring by hand in a factory producing thousands of similar parts speaks volumes of their level of automation. I feel sorry for them.
     
  15. DragunovHUN

    DragunovHUN I want to change my name but I also don't

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    Well at least they have jobs. Think about it. If their factories were automated, THEN you'd have a reason to feel sorry for them because they'd be unemployed.
     
  16. logan'srun

    logan'srun following the footsteps of giants

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    Six Sigma? ORLY? Been to many factories in Asia? I doubt it. What you see is a fact of life in SE Asia and most factories still save money by using hand labor instead of buying an expensive machine. Most factories are so basic that the owners close after one bad season. Just lock the doors and disappear leaving an empty shell of a building. Then you'd really have something to be sorry about.
    Let's see what happens in the next few months as all factories are taking orders now for Q1-2 2010 and see who survives the backlash of the 'crisis' .
     
  17. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

     
  18. Javerh

    Javerh Topiary Golem

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    That's just why I feel sorry for the workers.

    Some of them would lose their jobs, but some of them could be able to have a job for decades. In addition to that, lots of asian factories consider their workforce to be expendable. It doesn't comfort a permanently injured ex-factory worker to know that others have a job. Especially if they have a job until they too get injured.
     
  19. dylAndroid

    dylAndroid is human?

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    The fear of technology and automation taking away jobs actually goes back over a hundred years, such as when mechanical weaving loom was introduced.

    In general, adding machine capital allows a given number of people to get even more things accomplished. In the long run, instead of putting people out of work, people shift jobs to new positions made possible by the leverage that the added machine capital has added. For example, a car company could provide higher safety and more design features in each car, with the same number of workers. Or in a larger perspective, society can support the creation of new companies, as well as push its economy further past basic survival industries (food, shelter, etc), and improve quality of life for most people if not everyone.

    In the short run, adding technology creates change, which can be painful. People may need to train themselves in new skills to make a shift, and some people may find themselves out of work and unable to properly care for their families for a while. But this sort of thing happens even in the regular battling of organizations anyway, showing up strongly at times like right now. So factoring in all the good aspects of technology, machinery is quite a good thing, when economically and strategically appropriate to implement.

    People and employment is more a conversation about education, health, rule of law, etc., than it is about technology. Well, until/unless society gets to the point of computer intelligence mixed with pervasive automation that individual work is no longer necessary to society. I ran across a section of books in a basement storage area of one of my school's libraries, arguing furiously with each other about whether that would be awesome or the doom of us all.
     
  20. SARTH

    SARTH New Member

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    Taiwan has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the world - under 5% and highest literacy rates - over 95%. Their per capita income is just under 32K which is just below Germany and Canada !!! I wouldn't worry so much about automation and such. And obviously, no disrespect to bit-tech.net, but I highly doubt, they went out of their way to clean the factory up before the tour.
     
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