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Motherboards I need a help about install SSD sata III in my Intel Mobo

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Edde, 20 May 2012.

  1. Edde

    Edde What's a Dremel?

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    Please, I really need a help.


    I just built a new computer and it works. I have not installed the operating system, which will be pro windows 7 64 bit

    But I never built a PC with SSD before.

    So... I have two simple questions
    I bought an intel SSD 510 series (Marvell Controller) and want to install windows 7 PRO in it.


    And I am not sure about the conections. ( I know its a shame but it's my 1st PC with SSD) and my first motherboard with SATA 6.0


    I have the motherboard DZ68BC. What port should I connect the SSD? in the SATA port number ZERO 6.0 (dark blue?)? And the DVD reader? I plug it in Port ZERO sata 3.0? (Or in a port?)
    I am so confused? Thank you so much. I really do not know the correct way to do it.

    OR I need to conect the SSD in SATA 3.0 port ZERO and the Plextor DVD in SAta 3.0 port 1? OR the inverse?


    I am very confused. when I turn on the computer appear a message the check the cable driver conection.


    Please, help me.


    Thank you in advance,


    Edde


    PS: I have a video card. I need to desable the video onboard?
     
  2. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    The SSD should be in a SATAIII.. or as you call it, SATA 6.0.. it should be in "a fast one" anyway :)

    All other devices can go wherever you want, as they are so much slower they will not even get close to exceeding the bandwidth of the slowest SATA ports.

    When installing windows, remove all other drive except the SSD and the optical drive you have the windows disk in. Otherwise Windows has a habit of putting boot files on other drives which can cause problems later on if you ever need to restore from a back up.

    Make sure you have the SATA lead from the SSD in a SATA 6 port, and that you also have the SATA power lead connected. If you have the drive should now be visible in BIOS. If it's visible in BIOS... while you're in there, make sure your boot order is CD/DVD first, then your SSD.

    [edit]

    It's a good idea to partition the SSD to leave around 10% space unused for over provisioning.
     
    Last edited: 20 May 2012
  3. PocketDemon

    PocketDemon What's a Dremel?

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    Very quickly - yes the SSD should be in one of the dark blue ports...

    (the DZ68BC board, like many SB/iB boards, also has 2 'pretend' 6Gb/s Marvell ports - the lighter blue ones - which are slower... ...i find these to be good enough to plug in DVDs, etc into)

    Everything else that Pokyhead's written is fine - though personally i go for more over provisioning than that... ...but then i use SSDs in raid.
     
  4. Edde

    Edde What's a Dremel?

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    Hello everyone, thank you for your replies. I really appreciated it.

    I still with questions.
    My SSD is intel 510 series and it have a Marvell controller ( not sandforce)

    And the SATA ports in my mobo are 2 with z68 and 2 with Marvell controlers. see:

    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us...ard-dz68bc-interactive-layout-demo-video.html
    http://downloadmirror.intel.com/20248/eng/DZ68BC_TechProdSpec06.pdf

    From INTEL Manual: "
    1.6.2 SATA Interfaces
    The board provides six SATA connectors through the PCH and two SATA connectors
    and one eSATA connector through two Marvell controllers, which support one device
    per connector:
    • Two SATA 6.0 Gb/s interfaces through the Intel Z68 Express Chipset with Intel®
    Rapid Storage Technology RAID support (blue)
    • Two SATA 6.0 Gb/s interfaces through a Marvell controller (light blue)
    • One back panel eSATA 6.0 Gb/s port through a Marvell controller (red)
    • Four internal SATA 3.0 Gb/s interfaces through the Intel Z68 Express Chipset with
    Intel Rapid Storage Technology RAID support (black) "


    So, I should connect the SSD on the dark blue one?

    AND if these 6.0 ports don't recognize my INTEL SSD series 510? I should update the BIOS of the MOBO or conect the SSD in the 3.0 SATA ports?
    Or this port will recognize the SSD anyway?

    since my mobo have onboard video option and I am using the AMD SAPHIRE video card. Should I disable the onboard video on BIOS?

    Thank you again
     
  5. mikeyman198

    mikeyman198 Lets pretend this is hilarious.

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    Yes, connect the SSD to the Dark blue Intel controllers.
     
  6. Edde

    Edde What's a Dremel?

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    Hello everyone here, you helped me a lot. Thank you for all information. I really appreciated all suport.

    I decided install the windows 7 PRO even not accessing the BIOS. I think everything was successful. The system looks very stable.

    Only nowI read some information that I would forced to enter into the BIOS using the back panel buttom. Now it's too late.

    Well, After installing the windows I could finally get into the bios using F2 and everything looks alright.
    The system recognized the SSD as 6G and the DVD driver PLEXTOR in 1.5 G .
    In bios, I setted the sata 6g to AHCI mode.
    THe BIOS Also recognized 16 gigas of Kingston HyperX and videocard.
    I think it's ok, not sure about it.

    Now only left to do::

    To set "integrated Graphics Device" to "Always Disable"
    Install MOBO drives and the video card drives.

    Now a few questions:

    I don't want a lot of thing in my computer, I want only the necessary. So, which drives of the MOBO from the CD I need to install for windows 64 bits?

    I have installed the windows on the SSD 510 series 120 gigas with no partition, it´s ok for that since I will use 2 other HHDs for files?
    Or I need to reinstall the windows?

    Where I find the TRIM command to enable it for the ssd as recommended?

    Should I use the catalist from the CD since my videocard is a new model or I should upload it from AMD web page?

    Oh, other thing, since I will use the AMD video card, is necessary install the video drives of the video onboard?

    I know I asking a lot of things, but the last computer I built was in 2007

    THank you for all ! I am very happy and this forum and great people here helped me a lot
     
  7. dullonien

    dullonien Master of the unfinished.

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    I've never owned an SSD, so I'm not the best to advise you about the partitioning, but from pooky's post, it appears that you should be leaving 10% of the drive volume unpartitioned? Please confirm those in the know? For you that would be roughly 12GB, so your Windows partition should be roughly 108GB. It might be possible to re-partition from within windows (right click on 'my computer' click 'manage' and then select 'disk management'. Here you can shrink the windows volume to the correct size. Again, wait for confirmation from those in the know.

    As for your other questions. You may not need to install any motherboard drivers because Windows 7 is pretty good at fetching them all for you, as long as your network adaptor was installed out the box and you're connected to the internet. To check, again right click on 'my computer', click 'manage', and this time navigate to 'device manager'. If there are any yellow exclamation marks there are drivers missing. You can tell windows to hunt for the drivers off the cd included with the motherboard.

    You do not need to install driver for the unused onboard VGA adaptor.

    It's best to download the latest AMD driver from their website for your discreet graphics card. The one supplied on the disk is almost always a few months out of date at the best usually.
     
  8. Pookeyhead

    Pookeyhead It's big, and it's clever.

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    At least, yes. Opinions vary on this. I got 10% because that's what the software with my Samsung 830 recommended... so I went a little further and did around 15%. Pocket Demon who seems to have researched the subject quite thoroughly recommends 28%, which would give partitioned space of:

    60GB SF/64Gb non-SF = ~46.6GB
    120GB SF/128Gb non-SF = ~93.1GB
    240GB SF/256Gb non-SF = ~186.3GB
    480GB SF/512Gb non-SF = ~372.5GB
     
  9. MSHunter

    MSHunter Minimodder

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    Always install newest drivers from company webpage the stuff on CD is 6 months old at least and thats at launch!
     
  10. MiNiMaL_FuSS

    MiNiMaL_FuSS ƬӇЄƦЄ ƁЄ ƇƠƜƧ ӇЄƦЄ.

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    This is interesting - why is this?
     
  11. aevitas

    aevitas What's a Dremel?

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    I'm also not an expert on SSD's as I'm building my new rig soon with my first SSD.

    But I'm guessing it's somewhat similar to the unallocated space on mechanical drives? I'm guessing it is a performance boost.

    "For an SSD, unpartitioned area is basically the same as free space, performance wise. For non-TRIM situations it is the only way to get that benefit."

    EDIT: A quick search got me this:

    and

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Write_amplification#Over-provisioning
     
    Last edited: 21 May 2012
  12. PocketDemon

    PocketDemon What's a Dremel?

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    Firstly, it's not quite the same as unallocated space on mechanical drives...

    ...with that process, it's primarily about only using the fastest outer cylinders to gain better speeds...

    ...whereas, with SSDs, nand is just nand - there being no speed advantage to one block of cells over another - & the OP area is in whatever nand blocks it happens to be in at a given time.


    Secondly, unpartitioned space is not quite the same as free space.

    This is basically because when you write to a SSD you do so in pages, whereas to erase pages you have to erase all of the pages in the block - moving any needed data into a new block.

    Now, with free space, this quantity of blocks can get increasingly 'fragmented' (for lack of a better term) over time - with more & more blocks containing pages of invalid data that will need the valid data moving entirely before they can be written to again...

    [Edit 2 (v.2)]

    ...whereas unpartitioned space (as with the standard OP) increases the number of blocks that will normally(#) have free pages d.t. the way that the internal registers work - & so can gain from benefits in your 1st quote (& below).

    [# it is, of course, possible to hammer a SSD with almost any amount of OP into the ground with ridiculous amounts of writes... ...but the more OP you have, the less likely you are to suffer speed issues.]​


    Whilst it's a subtle difference, ttbomk, it actually comes down to the formatted space being part of the logical registers which makes them unavailable immediately for all the facets of GC & whatnot within the physical registers...

    ...whereas standard OP & unformatted space are available within the physical registers for GC & whatnot.

    The total amount of nand equivalent to the OP area normally gets extra priority when it comes to pre-erasing blocks for future writes.

    [End Edit]

    * * * * *

    As to the quote from wiki... This vaguely covers two parts of OP...

    Alongside it being beneficial for (a) remapping failed blocks (reducing the total amount of OP of course) & (b) reducing write amplification with GC (as an side, remember that the effects of the trim command are run as a part of GC)...

    ...it is slightly miswritten as it also "helps lower the write amplification when the controller writes to the flash memory" generally...


    Separately to write amplification issues - where the direct impact is nand longevity - there is also an impact on the maintenance of speed.

    Whilst these are very heavy small r/w workloads, this link demonstrates the effect on speed maintenance on both the intel 520 & the V3 max iops.

    [NB the 520 & max iops are not 'Enterprise' SSDs, but consumer ones - it's slightly misleading]​

    However, the same principle applies in any situation when the GC (again remember that the effects of the trim command are run as a part of GC) cannot keep up with the write load...

    ...be that d.t. the write load being actually heavy, there not being sufficient free space, too many blocks containing invalid data, etc...

    * * * * *

    Now, that's not to say that you should over prioritise unpartitioned space, as too little free space will also increase the write amplification...

    My general 'rule of thumb' is that, at a minimum, you should aim for ~14% of the partitioned area being free space & ~7% extra OP on the current consumer drives (naturally this doesn't apply to the original V2s as they had 28% OP as standard)...

    ...& ideally, for a heavy multitasking workstation usage, go for ~20% free space & ~28% total OP - increasing the free space first.

    ...though, 'if' your usage were to be an extremely heavy small random r/w one, you may need to be looking at 40-50%+ OP d.t. write amplification issues - this being the kind of level that is recommended for getting a decent lifespan from MLC enterprise SSDs for workstations... Well, as an example, it's what intel recommend within their data sheet for the 710.

    [NB the 200GB 710 has 320GB of nand & a formatted capacity of ~186.3GB -> ~41.8% OP as standard...

    ...adding 20% to increase the longevity takes this up to ~53.4% OP.​

    &, separately, as i've said before, with a SSD that's for almost exclusively static data (ie a 2nd games installations only SSD), there is no need for particularly much free space or extra OP unless you're constantly uninstalling & reinstalling games.]​


    [Edit]

    i should perhaps add that there's no harm in having as much extra OP as you can - whilst still having a decent amount of free space...

    Well, the 2 old V Turbos in my sig have stupidly large amounts of OP for their usages - but then i simply don't need to use that much space on them & owned them before i bought the V2s... ...&, of course, they never slow down. :)
     
    Last edited: 21 May 2012

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