News IBM creates first 9nm carbon nanotube transistor

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by brumgrunt, 30 Jan 2012.

  1. brumgrunt

    brumgrunt New Member

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  2. Bede

    Bede Well-Known Member

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    Meh, they have a vested interest in keeping silicon - I doubt that their existing fabs could easily transition to carbon nanotubes.
     
  3. SexyHyde

    SexyHyde Member

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    While you have a point bede, they will also be aware that they need to move to carbon or be stuck with a technology that will shortly be end of life. They have known for a while silicon is problematic at the current size. Moving to carbon will give them a significantly better and longer future.
     
  4. maverik-sg1

    maverik-sg1 New Member

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    Developing <10nm in size transistors is a great acomplishment and should be applauded - kudos to you all for that achievement.

    I'd like to see some active competition in large scale manufacturing, this one has the potential to be just that - in reality how far away are we from seeing this in mass production? 10years?

    If we are looking at 14nm fabs in just two years based on silicone and the new Tri Gate designs, 10nm should effectively be just 4 or at maximum 6 years away - better get a shift on Carbon Nanotubes.
     
  5. Tattysnuc

    Tattysnuc Thinking about which mod to do 1st.

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    Great stuff IBM - Now let's see some actual working prototypes of complex chips!

    Be interesting to see if the changes in manufacturing process actually yield the purported benefits calculated from "simple" models used in the lab, or even if this can be developed into a mass production process...
     
  6. Dublin_Gunner

    Dublin_Gunner New Member

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    @ Bede: They must re-tool their fab facilities each time they move to a smaller manufacturing process anyway. The main difference will be in utilising the old equipment when they move on (which typically goes from creating state-of-the-art CPU's to chipsets, and other control IC's and older CPU designs). But this process in fact will help the adoption further down the line.

    Brief on what I mean.

    Equipment used for fabrication:
    Current: CPU 22nm > Chipset 32nm > Chipset / other 45nm
    Future: CPU 9nmCNT > Chipset 22nm > Chipset / other 32nm
    Future 1: CPU 7nmCNT > Chipset 9nmCNT > Chipset / other 22nm

    I used 7nm as an example, I do not know what node they could use beyond 9nm CNT.
     
  7. Omnituens

    Omnituens New Member

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  8. dark_avenger

    dark_avenger Well-Known Member

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    Had to come up with something new, can only shrink silicon so far.

    Bring on faster, cooler chips :D
     
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