1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News IBM shrinks magnetic storage to just 12 atoms

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by brumgrunt, 13 Jan 2012.

  1. brumgrunt

    brumgrunt New Member

    Joined:
    16 Dec 2011
    Posts:
    1,009
    Likes Received:
    27
  2. Tattysnuc

    Tattysnuc Thinking about which mod to do 1st.

    Joined:
    19 Jul 2009
    Posts:
    1,600
    Likes Received:
    57
    Hardly a practical working concept is it. More a "we can do something really neat" statement than a proof of concept, especially given the fact that you are essentially talking about superconductor properties.
     
  3. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    13,877
    Likes Received:
    2,852
    No, but neither was the first (bottle-sized) transistor. IBM reckons it works at room temperature, too, but needs 150 atoms instead of 12; that's still pretty damn small.
     
  4. Guinevere

    Guinevere Mega Mom

    Joined:
    8 May 2010
    Posts:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    176
    Since when was it claimed that Moore's Law applies to experimental lab based magnetic storage mechanisms? Moore's Law is about transistors (The general understanding anyway).

    It's Kryder's Law that applies to hard drives http://bit.ly/xyD1sP so even saying this experiment pushes past said law is stretching things a bit far, seeing as it's 100% impractical to put into practice at the current point in time.

    It's a lab trick, like 21 years ago when they wrote IBM in individual atoms http://bit.ly/xpQ1gj. Very clever and a show of what can be done in the lab, but not something mainstream.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    13,877
    Likes Received:
    2,852
    It was the comparative that IBM itself used, but you're right: Moore was originally talking transistors.
     
  6. Tattysnuc

    Tattysnuc Thinking about which mod to do 1st.

    Joined:
    19 Jul 2009
    Posts:
    1,600
    Likes Received:
    57
    So at room temperature the storage density is approximately 10x that of current technologies (based on 12 atoms being 100x denser)

    Wonder what the speeds of accessing data via this method is - it's almost pointless having all that storage space if it's slower to access than current technologies. Speed has been the biggest focus of late via SSD's, so I feel any technology would have to offer capacity as well as speed benefits. 200TB backup facilities would be fantastic, but it doesn't feel like a step forward for me - it's 2012 and the future of storage is little magnets? That doesn't feel like a new technology - more an optimization of one that's been done to death.

    How robust a mechanism really is this?
     
  7. PingCrosby

    PingCrosby New Member

    Joined:
    16 Jan 2010
    Posts:
    392
    Likes Received:
    7
    I built myself a compass using antiferromagnets before my trek across the Antarctica, got lost for months going round in circles and getting chased by bleedin polar bears. Bloody eBay.
     
  8. Sloth

    Sloth #yolo #swag

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    5,634
    Likes Received:
    208
    I think you were more lost than you originally thought, there are no polar bears in Antarctica. :worried:
     
  9. alialias

    alialias New Member

    Joined:
    1 Dec 2010
    Posts:
    59
    Likes Received:
    2
    ^^ So much negativity! This is amazing, whether it's applicable to real life right now or not, the sizes they are talking about are ridiculous.
    I will be posting this article to my Course Group on Facebook, and i'm sure some of them will be as excited about it as me.
    As far as I can see too, this would mean faster access times too, surely if it's more dense, then there's less area to look for data? I don't really know about that sort of thing, so correct me if i'm wrong.
     
  10. Phoenixlight

    Phoenixlight New Member

    Joined:
    29 Oct 2010
    Posts:
    64
    Likes Received:
    0
    I wish they'd hurry up, I want a 1 petabyte 6GB/s HDD by next december!
     
  11. DriftCarl

    DriftCarl Member

    Joined:
    2 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    602
    Likes Received:
    12
    kinda need a 100TB USB stick nowadays.
     
  12. ssj12

    ssj12 Member

    Joined:
    12 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    688
    Likes Received:
    1
    This is IBM we are talking about. If they develop something, they use the tech.
     
  13. LordPyrinc

    LordPyrinc Legomaniac

    Joined:
    7 Mar 2008
    Posts:
    598
    Likes Received:
    5
    Even, if this particular design runs to a commercial dead-end, perhaps some of the concepts and techniques will still provide value in other designs.
     
  14. mclean007

    mclean007 Officious Bystander

    Joined:
    22 May 2003
    Posts:
    2,035
    Likes Received:
    15
    I think that was the joke - according to the article "antiferromagnets alternate between north-polarisation and south-polarisation" so PingCrosby's home made compass took him to the north pole instead of south.
     
  15. PingCrosby

    PingCrosby New Member

    Joined:
    16 Jan 2010
    Posts:
    392
    Likes Received:
    7
    Thank god someone else apart from my psychiatrist understands me.
     
    boiled_elephant likes this.
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page