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News Intel announces Thunderbolt Ready upgrade programme

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 19 Nov 2013.

  1. Cei

    Cei pew pew pew

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    I'll believe it when I see it. My Maximus V Gene has a TB_HEADER on the board, with the PCIe 4x slot waiting for a card to slot in - a card that ASUS claimed to make (The ThunderboltEX). However, that expansion card simply never seemed to make it to retail.

    Thanks ASUS!
     
  2. alialias

    alialias New Member

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    -Xp- has hit the nail on the head for me here.
    There is going to have to be a big boost in the number of Thunderbolt peripherals for there to be enough people who will use this product to upgrade to Thunderbolt compatibility too. I'm sure the majority of people who imagine they will need Thunderbolt in the future will just buy a mobo that's already has the port and cut out the middle man.
     
  3. phuzz

    phuzz This is a title

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    SCSI was used in basically every server up until SAS started to turn up about 7-8 years ago.
     
  4. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic Ook ? Ook !

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    ... but this is server, not consumer. Drives where too expensive, just like SAS HDD are damn too expensive, reason why they are only used in servers (and maybe a few enthousiasts who want 15K RPM mass storage).

    Again, SCSI / SAS / TB --> server (and some Appleish for TB). Eveyone else only needs SATA / USB. Plus TB devices must have a special controler on their side, thus adding to their cost.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    Oh, how quickly we forget. SCSI was *incredibly* common in home computers. An SCSI upgrade (either PCMCIA-connected, like the Squirrel, or connected to the trapdoor slot, like the Blizzard-IV SCSI Kit) was pretty much required for the Amiga A1200. Mine has a Squirrel, off which I hang a CD-ROM with the option of chaining a scanner should I wish. Many Amiga external hard drives were SCSI too - even the ones that connected via the PCMCIA slot or, on earlier models, the expansion bay - and so were Atari drives. It was pretty much the only way to add a scanner to a home computer, too, beyond a few short-lived devices with strange proprietary connections. My Acorn Archimedes A5000 has a SCSI podule for a CD-ROM - and I'm pretty sure my RISC-PC has one as well, despite also having an internally-connected IDE CD-ROM.

    Sure, in the IBM-compatible world SCSI was less common - but to say the technology was only used in servers is to ignore a decade and a half of SCSI in a huge number of homes.
     
  6. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    Id expect a further Thunderbolt push by Intel with the next gen of cpus that will likely force a Thunderbolt port on every board.

    Every Apple laptop has a thunderbolt port on it these days so theres enough of them out there thats for sure. For device makers to consider making more Thunderbolt enabled devices.

    Fact is though Thunderbolt like USB 3.0 in a way offers way more bandwidth than your average consumer requires. A printer will never require a thunderbolt port for example. Niether will a mouse or keyboard all regular usb devices.

    Smartphones and tablets could make use of the bandwidth when your initially installing new files and transfering data but how many times a year do you wipe the phone or tablet and start a fresh.
     
  7. GuilleAcoustic

    GuilleAcoustic Ook ? Ook !

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    my scanner was connected using a parallel port ... and I used my Amiga CD32 as a CDROM drive using a serial cable to connect it to my Amiga2000 :D. Was not as fast as SCSI, but I was a poor teenager at this time.
     

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