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News Intel launches overclocking warranty programme

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by brumgrunt, 19 Jan 2012.

  1. brumgrunt

    brumgrunt New Member

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  2. LennyRhys

    LennyRhys Oink!

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    Very interesting - it's both clever and stupid IMO.

    Clever, because it will probably boost sales; and stupid, because it encourages the non-enthusiasts to do what only the enthusiasts should do.
     
    David likes this.
  3. bdigital

    bdigital Is re-building his PC again

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    I like it! Would give me more confidence in suicidle bench runs knowing that il get a replacement if it goes wrong
     
  4. David

    David Take my advice — I’m not using it.

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    Does Intel set any limits on vcore? If only the standard VID range applies then this whole thing is pointless.
     
  5. Margo Baggins

    Margo Baggins I'm good at Soldering Super Moderator

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  6. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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  7. LennyRhys

    LennyRhys Oink!

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    Since the warranty is meant for all enthusiasts, many of whom use extreme cooling and similarly extreme voltages like 1.8v, I'd hazard a guess and say no. :D
     
  8. Technobod

    Technobod Finally bought a desktop :D

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    Appears you can buy it direct from Intel too here; http://click.intel.com/tuningplan/
    I like the idea, but I get the feeling they will be a little too selective on what chips they take back, and how do they plan to determine if its died from 'external causes' or not?
     
  9. Margo Baggins

    Margo Baggins I'm good at Soldering Super Moderator

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    any day Mr Gareth :)
     
  10. suragh

    suragh Derp

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    good for people who fry their motherboards :p
     
  11. Tangster

    Tangster Butt-kicking for goodness!

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    Wish I had this last week.
     
  12. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Accidentally Funny

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    I hear what your saying but didn't we all have to start somewhere? at least this will give the wannabe "enthusiast" some peace of mind before they delve into their BIOS.
     
  13. Jehla

    Jehla Member

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    how will intel be deciding if the chip died to overlock or normal use?
     
  14. izools

    izools New Member

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    It wouldn't be difficult to dedicated a small area of the die to Flash which keeps a log of peak frequencies and voltages. Dead easy, in fact.
     
  15. r3loaded

    r3loaded Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure this is really necessary for most people. How many people not using sub-ambient cooling fry their CPUs? I'm sure it's useful if you're using a chiller/phase-change and driving 1.5v+ for long periods, but I think even most "enthusiasts" will not need it.
     
  16. yougotkicked

    yougotkicked A.K.A. YGKtech

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    dang, the first half of the article had me planning cold-air suicide runs to try and beat my current record of 5.2ghz, but once you mentioned the denial clauses all my dreams were shattered. now i have to approach it carefully. :(
     
  17. kzinti1

    kzinti1 New Member

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    My 1st thought was, Intel is backhandedly saying that they are making a profit of over half the retail price of their cpu's.
    The last part of their "escape clause", is an easy out for them. Especially 'improper testing', which is, in fact, what overclocking actually is.
    And, of course, asking people to voluntarily pay a premium over the already over-priced cpu's that are made by Intel. I won't be buying into this scheme.
    Instead of this, I'd like to see a "Guarantee of Overclockability". I have an i7-2500K that refuses to run at a stable 4.4GHZ., when the main selling point of SandyBridge was a reliable, stable, 5GHz. OC. I also own an i7-2600K that refuses to go over 4.8GHz. while maintaining stability.
    I've tried every single thing suggested to me to get these cpu's running at a stable 5.0GHz. Nothing has worked. I do, however, own one of the 1st i7-2600K's that came out quite a while before any motherboards were available. It, luckily, has been running at 5.0GHz., 24x7 for quite a long while now at very comfortable temperatures using a Corsair H100 closed-loop cpu cooler.
    Now that I own a pair of EVGA GTX590 Classified vga's, I'm going to add a separste loop just for these gpu's. When SandyBridge finally arrives, I'll be switching to a dual-loop, dual-pump, multi-radiator system. I already have everything ready and waiting. All I have to do is cut the tubing to size when I get a SandyBridge cpu and motherboard in a few more months. Hopefully, even sooner than that.
    It's been noted by many people in various Forums, that the older i7-2600K's and even the 2500K's run much better than the later batches. I think Intel can, and should, make all of their cpu's run consistently the same, batch after batch. They can do it if they just take the time to try.
    Whenever IvyBridge 1st arrives, I'm buying at least a pair of the very earliest batch I can get ahold of. I'm counting on them being the same as when SandyBridge cpu's were 1st made available and being the best cpu's Intel will have made by then.
     
  18. andrew8200m

    andrew8200m Well-Known Member

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    hello

    interesting fact for you.

    Intel cant prove if a chip has died through overclocking.

    This purchase as such is 100% profit as it offers no addition service over what the standard warranty does.
     
    Last edited: 19 Jan 2012
  19. GeorgeStorm

    GeorgeStorm Aggressive PC Builder

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    Really?
    How would that be?
     
  20. fluxtatic

    fluxtatic New Member

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    Seems like easy profits to me - you might be a little less careful about how far you push it, but the number of people that will push it until it blows will be tiny (although I'll admit I'd be tempted if I had stupid amounts of money.)

    So it's a feel-good for the average overclocker. If you do blow it, though, I'd give odds of less than 50/50 that Intel will actually replace it...at least not until they explain their methodology of determining what killed your proc.

    If this: "The enthusiast community is a critical market segment for Intel, and we are looking at more opportunities to serve that community" were actually true, make it part of the standard warranty. Yeah, I get that it's a fraction of what the CPU itself cost (3.5% - 9%, by my math), but it will end up being almost pure profit. If they were actually planning on paying out on a fraction of what the number they plan to sell, it'd cost a damn sight more than $35. Say their margin is 50% from retail - one guy blowing up his 3960 would eat up the money made on 14 or so warranties sold for that model. So, realistically, the odds of actually getting it replaced stand at 7% or less, I'd say...also factor in that if places like Scan are selling them, they get a little piece of that, too, further lowering those odds.

    Like any insurance, it might work out well for some indivduals, but overall it's a bit of a scam. Intel isn't so dedicated to the enthusiast community that they're planning to lose money here.
     
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