1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Is planting new grass difficult?

Discussion in 'General' started by mushi_999, 10 Jan 2008.

  1. mushi_999

    mushi_999 Member

    Joined:
    24 Dec 2006
    Posts:
    207
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm going to be moving to a house that has no grass because it is fairly new. So i would either have to pay for someone to plant grass or i would have to do it myself. I've heard doing it myself is cheaper. Has anyone ever done this? How hard is it? Would just throw seeds or grass?
     
  2. Jumeira_Johnny

    Jumeira_Johnny 16032 - High plains drifter

    Joined:
    13 Nov 2004
    Posts:
    3,688
    Likes Received:
    112
    Have someone lay sod for you or use a spray system like hydroturf. Just throwing seeds out there will lead to inconsistent results.
     
  3. oddball walking

    oddball walking ...!

    Joined:
    21 Sep 2005
    Posts:
    906
    Likes Received:
    4
    Just chuck some seed down then net it so the birds can't get at it. Make sure you get the right kind of grass seeds, though it would be best to ask at a proper garden center.
     
  4. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

    Joined:
    3 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    1,691
    Likes Received:
    58
    I seem to remember that when we did it it was just a case of; Dig ground->Throw down grass seed (a certain weight per square meter)-> Water it and dont walk on it for 6-8 weeks. The alternative is to get turf that comes in rolls already pre grown.

    Moriquendi
     
  5. mutznutz

    mutznutz Cos Ive got a beard u label me evil

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2007
    Posts:
    267
    Likes Received:
    0
    We did as above and aerated a bit by stabbing with a fork and spread the grass seed

    Worked quite well, we didn't need nets as we don't get birds in the garden cos of the cats :)
     
  6. willowthewhite

    willowthewhite Member

    Joined:
    7 Nov 2006
    Posts:
    238
    Likes Received:
    6
    A good tip is to give a second sprinkling of seed once the first has started to grow, you will have to wait a little longer until you can give it it's first mow though, and put more down then is actually needed because no matter what you do to stop them the birds will find a way to eat it.
     
  7. Krikkit

    Krikkit All glory to the hypnotoad! Super Moderator

    Joined:
    21 Jan 2003
    Posts:
    23,453
    Likes Received:
    368
    The best thing I've found is simply to use turf - there are plenty of online shops that sell very nice turf for decent prices, and you end up with a near-perfect lawn once the turf strips knit together.
     
  8. cderalow

    cderalow bondage master!

    Joined:
    23 Jan 2002
    Posts:
    3,519
    Likes Received:
    0

    Hydroturf is the easiest way to go.

    They spray a mulch/grass seed/fertilizer mix all over the area to grow grass, and let you just water it... the mulch helps keep birds away, and acts as a second fertilizer.

    It's what the majority of new construction landscapers use to grow grass... though the alternative sod method yields much quicker results, but costs a lot more.
     
  9. Moriquendi

    Moriquendi Bit Tech Biker

    Joined:
    3 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    1,691
    Likes Received:
    58
    The only problem with that is that dig soil=feline toilet...

    Moriquendi
     
  10. Guest-16

    Guest-16 Guest

    Yea, but cat **** is also great fertiliser. My parents grass is growing great since they got cats, but that's also partly because my dad doesn't want to cut it and get turd thrown on him from the mower.

    If you're impatient - Turf. Patient - Seed + Cover.
     
  11. Herbicide

    Herbicide Lurktacular

    Joined:
    27 May 2004
    Posts:
    1,533
    Likes Received:
    17
    Go to a garden centre, choose your type and amount of seed (perhaps ask to rent a spreader), toss the seed around evenly (ahem), rake it over, water it lightly.
    Store the surplus somewhere dark, cool and dry.

    - H.
     
  12. Clocked

    Clocked Yar! It be drivin' me nuts...

    Joined:
    11 May 2004
    Posts:
    525
    Likes Received:
    2
    thanks my coffee is now on my screen. happened to me once when i used to mow lawns, then i started checking for it and charging extra to lift it before i cut...
     
  13. johnnyboy700

    johnnyboy700 Active Member

    Joined:
    27 May 2007
    Posts:
    1,554
    Likes Received:
    18
    Use Astroturf, that way you never have to cut it and it will always stay green.
     
  14. speedfreek

    speedfreek New Member

    Joined:
    9 Nov 2005
    Posts:
    1,453
    Likes Received:
    1
    The juvenile in me thought drugs when I saw this article at first.

    If you want it to look green quick and keep the topsoil in place plant rye. that will grow much faster than grass and give time for the grass to get started.
     
  15. Guest-23315

    Guest-23315 Guest

    And skin you horribly when you fall on it.
     
  16. cpemma

    cpemma Ecky thump

    Joined:
    27 Nov 2001
    Posts:
    12,328
    Likes Received:
    55
    Getting a decent lawn is all in the preparation. A new property has likely had heavy vehicles driving all over it, compressing the surface and resulting in poor drainage forever more, so first thing to do is dig over (or Rotovate) the plot, removing any buried rubble. Rake level, then shuffle all over the lawn area like a penguin, feet together. Lightly rake to give an even fine surface, then lay turf on it or follow the seed instructions.

    There must be a UTube on this...
     
  17. mutznutz

    mutznutz Cos Ive got a beard u label me evil

    Joined:
    18 Nov 2007
    Posts:
    267
    Likes Received:
    0
    Make one :D
     
  18. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

    Joined:
    25 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    3,536
    Likes Received:
    120
    im a landscape gardener so take heed:

    seeding manually will produce the best lawn. make sure the soil underneath your hopeful lawn is good quality rootzone otherwise you may get residual weed growth. other option is to get a company to spray a bit of herbicide like roundup over the area twice maybe three times before seeding. or seed it and have a selective herbicide put down if any weeds come up. during initial germination, weeds will be alot more profound if they are about because the grass roots will not have spread too much, but over the course of the first year the grass will strangle the worst of it out, as long as it isn't daisy's or dandelions...they are the toughest.

    for seeding, rent a spreader from a landscape company. new ones cost around £500 (i have no idea why), but they do ensure an even spread. plant your seed in early april to early may, middle of april should produce pretty decent results. but if it doesnt germinate well, feed it very lightly over the summer and give a second seeding, perhaps a bit lighter in seed spread density in the middle of september while it is still warm and starting to rain.

    turf is okay if you want an instant lawn, you can spend a hell of a lot of money on it to get the best turf, but at the end of the day it's grown in fields in the middle of nowhere, and various grass types will end up germinating at some point on your lawn because of this.

    cpemma's advice is good for turfing, you don't want heavily compacted rootzone below the turf, rotovate then rake well to even out the surface and then do the penguin shuffle and rake out any lumps and bumps but dont rake deeper than about 5mm else the turf will be loose for a long time.

    for seeding, very mildly rotovated flat land is best, much like turf prepped land. grass seed germinates very easily so no matter how hard the ground is, it will pick up eventually if you have dodgey land. make sure you get suitable seed though, best is from a dedicated grass seed vendor as there are many types for shady areas, all day sun, acid and alkalai soil and so on, so getting the right seed is very important! make sure you get a cool season grass, personally i think velvet bentgrass/agrostis canina L. is really nice, very very fine grass but requires alot of care, so colonial bentgrass might be more suitable as that is more general purpose.

    also, if you do seed manually, think about running a very shallow and light spiker over the whole area, it's hard to do properly and find the right equipment but it really helps germination.

    once your lawn is majority established, roll a heavy spiker over it weekly to ten days, this breaks up roots, airates and encourages newer, denser root growth, which basically keeps the grass in its most vigorous growth pattern.

    the hydroturf suggested above is admittadley pretty damn good for mere ease of use. perfectly executed seeding will produce marginally better results and it will be cheaper. hydroturf is handy for steep inclines as it sort of sticks to the ground so you dont get any seed rolling away if it's a particularly dry day, but it is relatively quite costly!

    hope this helps and feel free to ask a question as there is a lawn specialist on my team that i could ask more specific things.
     
  19. Freedom

    Freedom Member

    Joined:
    27 Oct 2004
    Posts:
    804
    Likes Received:
    16
    julianmartin pretty much sums everything up I would advise. and like he says if you live the northern hemisphere then it too early to be doing anything with grass wherever it be by seed or Turf remember that when choosing a grass seed type take into consideration what your planing on doing on the grass. Is it going to get regular use in which case you want a tougher variety. If you want a lawn that's more decorative then you need a seed type that's not as tough. I cant remember any specif breeds of the top of my head.
     
  20. notatoad

    notatoad pretty fing wonderful

    Joined:
    25 Jun 2004
    Posts:
    3,213
    Likes Received:
    60
    i was working for a landscaping company last summer and got suckered into laying sod a couple of times. don't do it yourself. hire a good landscaping company that will give you a warranty on their work. they will have all the tools to prepare the ground before seeding/sodding, they will have the necessary chemicals and somebody certified to apply them properly, and they will do a better job than you can do.

    most importantly, don't do it now. wait until late spring.
     

Share This Page