1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

News ISPs failed to deliver advertised speeds to over 15 million UK households

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Dogbert666, 19 Jun 2015.

  1. Dogbert666

    Dogbert666 *Fewer Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    17 Jan 2010
    Posts:
    1,603
    Likes Received:
    135
  2. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    9,212
    Likes Received:
    306
    Which's figures do make me wonder how they judged that connection weren't getting maximum speeds, was it 10kb, 500kb, 1Mb a second under the advertised max speed? I only question it because 98 percent seems awfully high to me.
     
  3. Flibblebot

    Flibblebot Smile with me

    Joined:
    19 Apr 2005
    Posts:
    4,646
    Likes Received:
    150
    Well I live in a rural area with overhead telephone lines on an "up to 8Mb" connection, and I'm currently getting 4.4Mb, so I wouldn't be surprised if a large proportion of that 98% rural customers aren't sitting at the 50% or less mark of advertised speeds.

    The real bummer for us rural folk is that we'll never get fibre because OpenReach will never replace all these copper cables with anything other than more copper.
     
  4. dancingbear84

    dancingbear84 error 404

    Joined:
    16 Oct 2010
    Posts:
    2,191
    Likes Received:
    73
    I too feel your pain, I'm in the same metaphorical boat, our nearest neighbours get 1mb, I get 4.

    I found this site, though I don't know whether they would actually do anything for us here, YMMV

    http://www.gigaclear.com/
     
  5. B1GBUD

    B1GBUD ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Accidentally Funny

    Joined:
    29 May 2008
    Posts:
    3,306
    Likes Received:
    409
    **Hugs my 160Mb Virgin connection**
     
  6. ccxo

    ccxo On top of a hill

    Joined:
    23 Oct 2009
    Posts:
    1,648
    Likes Received:
    17
    The regular which news item, Fibble have you looked at your counties BDUK project- you may be covered by phase 1 or 2.
     
  7. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

    Joined:
    27 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    15,796
    Likes Received:
    4,484
    I live in a similar place small village in the Welsh mountains even before fibre I was getting 17Mb constant on a up to 7Mb? and now on fibre 70Mb.
     
  8. TheMadDutchDude

    TheMadDutchDude The Flying Dutchman

    Joined:
    23 Aug 2013
    Posts:
    4,744
    Likes Received:
    521
    I used to be on ADSL with Sky and we used to get around 7Mbps out of our supposed 8Mbps line. I was happy with that. It then started deteriorating and it ended up at 2Mbps before we pulled the plug. We switched to BT Infinity as that had become available, and have never looked back. We now get a constant 48 - 50Mbps through the same line. It's only FTTC, so no cabling has changed from the cabinet to our house.
     
  9. David

    David RIP Tel

    Joined:
    7 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    13,172
    Likes Received:
    2,186
    The old "upto" chestnut.

    I'm signed up for 38meg FTTC but I'm receiving the 76meg service which, in real terms, delivers around 62megs. :D

    Perhaps ISPs should just stop marketing their service based on theoretical maximums, or at least make the effort to be up front about the fact that most people won't receive it - rather than a minuscule asterisk denoting further information but making frikkin difficult to find out what?
     
  10. Big Elf

    Big Elf Oh no! Not another f----ing elf!

    Joined:
    23 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    3,381
    Likes Received:
    218
    I reckon the wiring can play a part too. I recently upgraded to fibre and initial speeds were 45Mbps down, 12Mbps up. After a couple of weeks I had regular dropouts and the speed dropped to 38Mbps down and 12Mbps up so after trying all the usual stuff Zen got BT to check it out.

    The engineer couldn't find anything obvious and it didn't drop out while he was there but he changed the wiring from the point where it came into the house to the socket. The speeds immediately increased to 72Mbps down and 15Mbps up. After another couple of weeks the speeds have stabilised at 64Mbps down and 15Mbps up and haven't dropped out once.
     
  11. TheMadDutchDude

    TheMadDutchDude The Flying Dutchman

    Joined:
    23 Aug 2013
    Posts:
    4,744
    Likes Received:
    521
    Ooh. I wish mine would go up like that! Mine isn't even rated for Infinity 2 according to BT, yet I get 50Mbps. They tried to talk me into getting Infinity 1 because that's all their checker can say my line can handle. Funny, that, I've been on Infinity 2 since it came to the area, and that's the one they first suggested for our line capability when it came to our area three years ago. :D
     
  12. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

    Joined:
    27 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    15,796
    Likes Received:
    4,484
    I have a mate in Cornwall a tiny 3 house village they was still getting dial up speeds so they with the farmers permission paid to have a new cable ran to the nearest town and now they still only get 2Mb at best :eyebrow: the old line was just wet string I think lol
     
  13. Tynecider

    Tynecider Since ZX81

    Joined:
    23 Jun 2009
    Posts:
    806
    Likes Received:
    28
    Invite some pikies into the neighborhood, They'll be up and down them telephone poles like a whores pair of knickers moves on De Wallen!!!, Encourage this reapeatedly and Mr BT Fibre guy will eventually do you all the favour ;-)
     
  14. Syphadeus

    Syphadeus Member

    Joined:
    1 Mar 2012
    Posts:
    59
    Likes Received:
    1
    Am I the only one who thinks the current advertising standard of 10% is absurdly low? I can't really think of an analogous market or product to make a comparison to, but the idea that in order to advertise a headline speed only 1 in 10 prospective customers need be able to get it seems really dodgy.

    It may be that TalkTalk's response has not been quoted accurately, but if it has, then it is a non sequitur rebuttal - "Our data, based on over half a million customers, which far exceeds Which's base of a few hundred, shows that TalkTalk homes can achieve speeds beyond 17Mbps". What percentage of those customers "can" achieve speeds beyond 17Mbps though? The statement is also very non-committal because it doesn't actual dispute Which?'s finding, it's just fluff.
     
  15. play_boy_2000

    play_boy_2000 It was funny when I was 12

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2004
    Posts:
    1,411
    Likes Received:
    48
    You guys have always been terrible for that, so it's hardly a surprise. My ISP is the exact opposite - They have a tool that automatically calculates the number of active pairs in your binder group, the line length, noise floor and maximum expected sync in an above normal binder group utilization. Even if the real world measurements show far more leeway, the tool is tied into the sales system and will block out the packages it thinks are un-supported/sustainable.

    It's kind of a pain in the arse of you're 1m out from the next speed tier, but when they started selling IPTV, they really had to clamp down on it to avoid pixelization issues.
     
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page