1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Job predicament.

Discussion in 'Serious' started by Archtronics, 26 Jun 2014.

  1. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

    Joined:
    6 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,428
    Likes Received:
    39
    "Thanks for giving me the opportunity for demonstrating my worth and ability. It's unfortunate that you have been unable to find a paying position for me that lets me continue to do so. Sadly I need to find something that actually allows me to make a living"

    I don't agree with planning to leave with unfinished work, that closes doors not just with the boss but with colleagues too - some people have long memories and what are peers and beneficiaries of your work now may be on the other side of the interview table in the future. You definitely need to move on, the guy that said that is clearly a narcissistic arsewipe, but there is no need to alienate the whole organisation in the process.
     
  2. julianmartin

    julianmartin resident cyborg.

    Joined:
    25 Jul 2004
    Posts:
    3,536
    Likes Received:
    120
    I think this is a bit antagonistic.

    I kind of agree with you from a principle stand point, of not screwing people over, but it is the organisation's duty to ensure this doesn't happen, not the OP's. What would OP do if someone came along and offered him 30k elsewhere? He's sure as hell not going to stay and no-one would blame him. Responsibility for this kind of thing only goes so far in my opinion. Far too many people get bogged down in the workplace with issues that don't benefit them. Look after #1 first, then if you can help #2 in the process, that's a bonus. OP is there for HIM, not them.

    If the boss does genuinely act and behave as described, then people like the OP leaving him in the lurch should be kind of expected, IMO. As long as the OP explains why to the boss (he either might get a job, apology or prevent it happening again), then there is no reason not to leave.
     
  3. Landy_Ed

    Landy_Ed Combat Novice

    Joined:
    6 May 2009
    Posts:
    1,428
    Likes Received:
    39
    I'm not saying that. I'm saying that to plan to screw them over is not good.

    How is saying you need to find a job that pays real money antagonistic?
     
  4. bawjaws

    bawjaws Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2010
    Posts:
    3,489
    Likes Received:
    370
    Julian's advice is sound - be firm, be polite, be professional. If they want to keep you on, great, but if not then you get your reference and can move on. If you don't force the issue, there's no reason for them to ever consider paying you for work that you're doing for free.

    As far as leaving work unfinished goes, you need to politely inform them that it's time for you to move on to find paying work, and remind them that there's still work to be done to complete your current project. If they value your input, then it might incentivise them to throw some remuneration your way, but if not then at least you've been professional and given them a heads-up that your leaving will cause them a problem in terms of getting the job completed.

    It's always best to be professional, especially if you plan on making a career in the same industry, as you never know who'll you end up working with or under in the future. Even if you feel that your boss has acted badly by taking advantage of you, be the bigger guy and walk away with your head high.
     
  5. Jim

    Jim Ineptimodder

    Joined:
    2 Sep 2007
    Posts:
    310
    Likes Received:
    7
    I don't understand what you're getting from this.

    You're not getting any money, obviously. Are you forging links that feel likely to result in job offers? I can't imagine that anyone other than the boss is in a position to give you a job, and he clearly has no intention of doing so at present. Are you going to get a glowing reference that will then get you a job elsewhere? I'm not convinced. Your boss is under no obligation to do anything - and most companies' idea of a reference is to confirm that a person worked for them between dates x and y.

    You've definitely got some good experience that you could put on a CV and mention in an interview, but that's already in the bag.

    My inclination would be to regretfully inform your boss that owing to financial conditions you won't be able to continue working for free, and need to find a job that will pay in order to sort the bills. If they have any intention of giving you payment, they'll do so (and with the job half-finished, there is presumably a big incentive to do so). If not, you leave with some great experience in the bag, a written reference if your boss is feeling generous, and look for a paid job - and IMO you won't lose out in any way.

    Don't forget as well that even if they start paying you, there will be little to stop them terminating the contract once the job is completed. I'm not saying that to be difficult, but just because I can well see it happening. But at least you'll have been paid for that period.
     
  6. Solidus

    Solidus Superhuman

    Joined:
    26 Dec 2005
    Posts:
    1,794
    Likes Received:
    24
    The best thing to do is get a reference out of them.

    I would suggest that you talk to them about how you hope to work for them if a position becomes available but that you would like a reference so you can look for paid work and something you can turn into a career.

    Say you enjoyed your time and hope to apply in the future - leave it on good terms and im sure if they can hire you based on your positive track record they would consider it.
     
  7. Teelzebub

    Teelzebub Up yours GOD,Whats best served cold

    Joined:
    27 Nov 2009
    Posts:
    15,796
    Likes Received:
    4,484
    Tbh I think you've already shown your worth paying and they're just taking advantage of you, talk to the boss and make it clear you believe you have been and would be an asset to company but you need a proper paying job so if he's not prepared to employ you full time the you must look elsewhere.

    If has any sense he will take it on board if not you're well out of no hope job
     
  8. rainbowbridge

    rainbowbridge Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    26 Apr 2009
    Posts:
    3,171
    Likes Received:
    69
    just want to say I am disappointed you are being treated like that, and the only thing that comes to mind is you offer the company your services by way of short term 1 month rolling contract some such option.

    makes me upset to read the op post.
     

Share This Page