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PSU Kettle lead/PSU questions

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by nsymons, 5 Nov 2009.

  1. Ravenheart

    Ravenheart New Member

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    Reading this has been quite interesting and may just help the user over on Corsairs forum who posted this topic Lost my TX750W PSU Cable! asking for advice on psu cables and what fuse to use.

    So thanks for the info and I've credited Tonpal and Pookeyhead over on Corsairs forum for providing the information on the fuses/amps info provided here as it may just have helped someone who requested some info on this very thing.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Phil Rhodes

    Phil Rhodes Hypernobber

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    Further to earlier answers, no it is most certainly not. The sort of cable used by PC power supplies (and much else besides) is strictly speaking an IEC C13 connector, which is emphatically not the same thing. Usually C13 is fused at 5A, which is very considerably more than any sane PC should pull in the UK. Let's get this right:

    IEC C13:

    [​IMG]

    IEC C15, a "kettle lead":

    [​IMG]

    Note C15 has a cutout in it to stop stupid people using a C13 to run a kettle.

    Please stop referring to C13 as a "kettle lead" as it isn't one, no matter how much ebuyer used to like mis-selling them as such. A PC's power cable will not fit a kettle and even if it did, you'd blow the fuse more or less immediately on a 3KW kettle. If you put a "kettle lead" style 13A fuse in your PC's mains cable, or actually use a "kettle lead" to power the PC, it will be mis-fused and therefore pose a small additional risk of fire.

    P
     
  3. capnPedro

    capnPedro Hacker. Maker. Engineer.

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    Fine. I'm calling it a grill lead from now on. (I have a server powered by a Tefal grill's C-****ing-13 cable)
     
  4. Ravenheart

    Ravenheart New Member

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    So Phil,

    How is a "kettle lead" style 13A fuse any different from a PC's mains cable 13A fuse? The fuse goes into the plug part of said cables, as far as I'm aware there aren't 2 different types of 13A fuse!

    And FYI the Corsair HX850 psu I'm using now clearly shows (on the plug part) 13A so it must have a 13A fuse in it, and that lead came with the psu as it was in the box.
     
  5. Cupboard

    Cupboard I'm not a modder.

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    It really shouldn't have a 13A fuse in it, or otherwise should have the notch out of the cable.
    They have provided something that doesn't stick to the standards.

    I could put a 13A fuse in a cable only meant for 6A in the same way I could put 32A ends on a 13A cable, but that doesn't necessarily make it a good idea! Likewise, I could make a cable that doesn't conform to standards, and provide it with a PSU that might need the extra current what what happens then when someone plugs a 5A fused cable/plug in? the fuse goes. Not good!
     
  6. Ravenheart

    Ravenheart New Member

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    Cupboard,

    So what your saying is that if the cable that came with the Corsair psu has a 13A fuse in it is that they provided something that doesn't stick to the standards?

    I'll check what fuse is in it but it does say 13A on the cable that came with the psu so I would assume it's a 13A fuse in it but I'll definitely let you know.

    P.S) I'm interested on how exactly you could make a cable that doesn't conform to standards, do you actually have the kind of equipment to physically make the cable lol.
     
  7. Ravenheart

    Ravenheart New Member

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    Well Cupboard,

    I've checked and it is defnitely a 13A fuse in the lead that came with the Corsair psu, so what your saying is it shouldn't be a 13A fuse at all and Corsair are wrong to have included a lead with a 13A fuse in it.
     
  8. Dreamslacker

    Dreamslacker New Member

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    Not quite.
    The difference between the C13 and C15 connectors is the specified working temperature limit. The former is rated for use up to 70'C and the latter up to 120'C or 155'C (C15A).

    The cable, mains plug and fuse (where applicable) play a bigger part in determining the current limit rather than the IEC connector.
    If the IEC C13 connector imposes a 5A limit, then Americans would be having a problem (their mains run at half the voltage, ie. twice the current for a given load).
     
  9. Dreamslacker

    Dreamslacker New Member

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    It's easy to buy a 3 pin plug, 3 core cable and IEC C13/ C15 connector from Farnell/ Newark, Digikey etc.
    In fact, I'm quite certain you can buy those off the shelf at Ratshack (or whichever equivalent is in your country of residence).
    I personally make my own IEC cables for my audio equipment. Personally, I prefer Schurter for the IEC and MK Hospital or Permaplugs for the 3-pin mains plug.
     
  10. Cupboard

    Cupboard I'm not a modder.

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    The biggest issue, as Dreamslacker said, is the actual cable rather than the connectors at the end. However the connector does play some part.
     
  11. Vimesey

    Vimesey New Member

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    Don't see why you'e so bothered, its just slang that, yes isn't fully accurate but, people know what they mean by it. Like the whole difference between flat panel and flat screen, people use it incorrectly all the time, but everyone knows what they mean.

    Lighten up, English has plenty of slang :thumb:
     
  12. Dreamslacker

    Dreamslacker New Member

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    Yes, they do (connector rating).
    IEC only does the specification; in this instance, the C13 is specified for 10A. ie. it has to be capable of passing at least 10A continuous.
    The important part is actually the UL/ CSA certification. That is the certified safe operating limit.
    The Schurter IECs I use are IEC specified 10A but UL/ CSA certified to go up to 15A.
    The cabling I'm particularly fond of using is the Prysmian Flextreme 3 core 2.5 rated for 29A. It's a pain in the butt to get it to fit into most UK mains plugs and IEC connectors though.
     
    Last edited: 17 Nov 2009

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