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News Kingmax unveils invisible heat sinks

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 9 Jun 2010.

  1. Mraedis

    Mraedis New Member

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    It's regular RAM with optimized heat dissipation, not an 'invisible' heatsink attached to it.

    I bet you could add some coolant paste and a heatsink and the dissipation will be 'transfered' because of optimised contant between paste and RAM.
     
  2. [USRF]Obiwan

    [USRF]Obiwan New Member

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    Let me further enhance that to Liquid Oxygen
    Very explosive, especially when mixed with Ozone, but extremely cold and I could in theory levitate my pc...


    But in reality I was pointing to Oxygen in the form of O2.
     
  3. Azayles

    Azayles New Member

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    It's strange the number of people who say about the hazards of oxygen, but don't realise it's not the oxygen itself that's explosive etc. You can't light oxygen, you need something to be alight or at least incandescent for a reaction to occur. Oxygen simply enhances the reaction that's already there.
    So to summarise, oxygen inside your computer case will do nothing unless your computer is already on fire.

    In which case you're f*cked.
     
  4. metarinka

    metarinka New Member

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    the material scientist in me guesses its a coating that increases the ability for it to radiate heat in the infrared spectrum. Hence it makes the thing more efficient for radiant cooling, convection is still the main cooling mechanism and convection does benefit from higher surface area.

    but as mentioned ram usually doesn't thermally overload.
     
  5. yougotkicked

    yougotkicked A.K.A. YGKtech

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    well, despite all you nay-sayers, a thermodynamics nerd is here to say; I think this is real. while it is true that maximizing surface area is usually the best way to improve cooling, there are other ways to go about it. if Kingmax is simply coating their RAM modules with a thin layer of a highly heat-conductive material, it could serve to move the heat more evenly around the module, making better use of the surface area the module already provides. microscopic cracks and such don't actually add enough surface area to improve cooling, but they do inhibit the transfer of heat across the PCB, causing heat to concentrate in smaller areas, where it takes longer to dissipate.

    I'm not sure what Kingmax is doing, or how effective it really will be, but there certainly is the potential for something like this to work.
     
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