1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Portable laptop/tablet hybrid

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by weepete, 13 Nov 2012.

  1. weepete

    weepete Member

    Joined:
    11 May 2011
    Posts:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Or lablets, convertables or tabtops.... Most seem pretty new but my wee lass has decided she wants one for christmas and I'm busting my head trying to figure out if they are any good, and which one would be best. Has anyone else looked at them or can give a bit of advice?
     
  2. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

    Joined:
    20 Jan 2007
    Posts:
    12,300
    Likes Received:
    710
    Before you look for which tablet to get, what I suggest is to look for which ecosystem best fit your needs. Once you find it, now you can compare tablets to get.

    As ecosystems you have:
    -> Apple iOS
    -> Android
    -> Windows 8/RT

    All have their strengths and weaknesses.

    To get you started:
    Apple iOS, offers you an ecosystem all tied up with iTunes and iCloud, and all interconnected properly with Apple own line of products. You are blasted with apps, accessories (actually now with the new connector, all are gone now... you have to wait until Apple allows manufacture to do them, so far it's a no). The product is easy to use, and you have a simple choice of products... iPad series.

    Android is all open. It's like what Windows is now with program on the desktop. You find something you like, you install and enjoy. But you can have malware and such, so you have to be careful where you get your stuff. Stay with Google store and you have nothing to worry about. The layout of teh OS is tablet optimized, but it support mouse and keyboard, and you can find a wide variety of convertable tablets (converts to laptop by connecting a keyboard. See ASUS transformer series as an example). The OS is fully open, and ready for you to tinker.
    However, It is to be noted that not all Android device provide you the same experience. Some will give you super high specs, but the OS will be choppy, others will be the contrary, you have to read reviews, or stick with Google offering. The reason for this, is that some (not all), manufacture wants to do their own interface, and they are sometimes done quickly and poorly. I recommend you get a Android device that stick with the default Android OS. Not modded. Also it makes updating the OS easier, no need to wait for special version , or root it to force you own Android mod or release onto it. Great multitasking device. Lots of apps on the store. Connectivity varies, you usually have a TV output (works only on select apps, mostly video players only), and memory card reader.

    Windows RT, is Windows 8. So it's powerful environment, complete with desktop and Windows utilities that you come to expect. You just you can't run x86 programs, due to the CPU architectural difference (and lack power compared to x86 processors from Intel and AMD). So you use Windows App Store to get apps. As we speak, apps are low and not yet all of great quality. It will take time. As it runs Windows, you have what you expect (varies depending on the models, but usually you have): a real normal USB 2.0 port which you can connect removable drive, keyboard, mouse, printer, game controller, etc. Also has a memory card reader, and video output for true dual screen support (clone or extended, like in normal Windows). Due to the weak processor like all ARM processor based systems, don't expect to run a 30inch monitor, but a 1920x1200 should be fine. You also have XBox Music which offers you free music streaming with ads, or unlimited streaming and download, ads free for a few dollars per month (price varies form where you are, see if the service is available in your region before). Apps purchased on Windows RT device, will be available to download for free on other Windows RT or 8 devices (up to 3 or 5 I don't recall). Basically they are tied to your account. Its also very good at multitasking. Simple things, like changing the brightness doesn't, like iOS, require you to leave the app, go to settings, go to a few option sub section and now you can adjust, and then return back. It's all there in front of you, like Android.
    You have a variety of devices that are tablet only, or like Microsoft Surface a tablet and laptop. Office 2013 is included.

    Windows 8, well like Windows RT, just it does not include Office 2013, and you can open x86 programs, like on your desktop and laptop. The down side is reduce battery life, as you are using an AMD or Intel processor, heavier and thicker device (needs to cool the hot processor, and requires larger battery), and much higher price tag (see it as an ultrabook).
    The exiting product is Surface Pro, coming early next year, it will feature a Core i5 processor, microSD card reader, USB 3.0, 1080p resolution IPS panel, digitize pen support (so proper pen support), 10-point multi-touch screen and mini-DisplayPort out. If you can't wait, you have a variety of manufactures that offers a tablet/laptop convertible powered by Win8 already.

    I would suggest to analysis you needs, and check more in depth each ecosystems, and see which best fit your needs
     
  3. Publ!c Enemy

    Publ!c Enemy or Richard for short

    Joined:
    4 Jul 2010
    Posts:
    176
    Likes Received:
    5
    Hey, I have a Asus tf300 and I have to be honest now I don't have time for gaming so much, I use it all the time, at college and at home, I do plug the keyboard in for doing proper work and its just like a netbook, but you still have the easy to use nature of the touch screen and the propper keyboard is really great, the touch pad isn't the best in the android os.
    Very practicle and the battery lasts probably 3days, 9hrs web browsing.
    As for thinking are they worth it, I love mine I was thinking it would be like a one trick pony thing, but its so useful and I can honestly say I use it every day.
    If you've got any questions about it, please ask cause I know when I bought it I wasn't 100% about it, just little things like how bright does the screen go or what ever.
    Cheers, Richard :)
     
  4. weepete

    weepete Member

    Joined:
    11 May 2011
    Posts:
    98
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the replies guys, very helpful. The wee lass is 12 so I imagine it'll mostly be used for school work, web browsing, social media (when we eventually allow her to get a FB account!), and possibly a bit of photo editing if its capable. She's not really a gamer atm either.

    I do have a few questions I've been thinking about, but like I said this tech seems pretty new, so there's comparatively little info out there, at least that I can find.

    What would be the best OS for it, given that she'll need MS office? I'm not an apple fanboy either, having owned an iphone for a few years before I switched to android I don't like the way they operate. But is it simply a straight choice between buying Windows 8 and an android?

    I'm also wondering if she'd be better off going for a Nexus 10 and hoping that they bring out a keyboard for it soon, or is that just a bad idea?
     
  5. GoodBytes

    GoodBytes How many wifi's does it have?

    Joined:
    20 Jan 2007
    Posts:
    12,300
    Likes Received:
    710
    Well, to me it sounds like Windows 8 or Windows RT will best fit her needs.

    By photo editing I don't know how far you mean, if it's a quick color adjustment, than for sure there is or will be an app on Windows RT, else you need to go with a Windows 8 device.

    As mentioned before, the coming up Surface Pro, will have digitize pen support as well as a 10-point multi-touch, and on a 1080p display. So you'll have the resolution to do more involved editing, and has a proper digitize pen support for more precision.
     

Share This Page