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Cooling LG775 Heatsink on tight enough?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by ghaarnok, 8 May 2009.

  1. ghaarnok

    ghaarnok What's a Dremel?

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    After much waiting I finally got to build my new system last night. The main items of concern here are:

    CPU: Intel Quad Q6600 (G0 Stepping)
    Mobo: Gigabyte EP45-UD3R Intel P45
    Cooler: Akasa AK-966 (a.k.a Blue Aurora)

    I also utilised some arctic silver 5 thermal paste applied as specified by the manufacturer.


    The cooler uses a backplate into which you screw the HSF. After doing this and tightening the screws to their full tension I noticed that I could still move the HSF slightly by twisting it. It feels like it's in contact with the CPU and thermal paste, however, my question would be that is this normal for LG775 processors?

    In the past I've been used to AMD coolers which apply much more pressure than this.

    I haven't had chance to run any proper thermal tests yet (need to install an OS) but after copying some files around using the ubuntu live CD I decided to reboot to bios. The temps in there were around 35 - 37 degrees C. To me, these seem a little high, and, as I want to overclock the CPU my concern is that it's simply not going to be able to handle the heat.

    Anyone have any prior experience or advice for me?
     
  2. SazBard

    SazBard 10 PRINT "C64 FTW"

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    Idle temps seem ok to me, but the heatsink should be nice and tight.
     
  3. johnnyboy700

    johnnyboy700 Minimodder

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    I've never noticed that before, I reckon you'll have a problem with that if you try and run it as is. You might want to check the following:-

    Make sure the screws are actually tight and even, the simple way to do this is to attach them diagonally (ie top right and bottom left then top left then bottom right) to begin with until either finger tight or they are just pinching the top of the HSF. Then tighten the screws in order, ie top left, top right, bottom right then bottom left.

    You should also make sure the threaded holes in the backplate haven't stripped, a quick way to check is put one of the screws into each of the holes in the backplate (make sure the screw goes all the way in) and gently pull on the screw whilst holding the backplate - it should not pull out. If it does then you have a problem.

    One thing you should be careful of, do not use too much thermal paste between the HSF and the CPU. If you do then it will cause them to slide across each other when you tighten the screws, they will excert a force across the mating faces causing them to move thanks to the lubricating effect of too much paste.
     
    Last edited: 8 May 2009
  4. ghaarnok

    ghaarnok What's a Dremel?

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I'm relatively sure that the screws are as tight as they'll go. The thread doesn't run all the way up the screws so I imagine I could be reaching the point where it's as far as they'll go. It's hard to tell though since they are shrouded in springs and there are passive heatsinks all around the socket area. I'll check it when I get home from work anyway, perhaps I was being over cautious with the screws whilst installing (you know what it's like when you get shiny new expensive hardware)

    I'm pretty sure I didn't use too much thermal grease either, I followed the instructions anyway, I suppose I could pick up some cleaner and try again.

    I'm not 100% sure why it isn't fitting correctly, perhaps it could be that the mobo is thicker than a regular mobo .... albeit not by much. However, since the mounting bracket screw holes poke though the motherboard I can't see this causing a problem, infact it should make for a tighter fit.
     
  5. thehippoz

    thehippoz What's a Dremel?

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    the true 120 is like that too.. what I did for a tighter clamp- you see the indent hole in the middle of the sink that the clamp swivels on.. stick a small nut (the size of the hole) down in there- it raises the point in which it swivels and applies more pressure to the sink :D

    some people have used pennies, but I tried a nut and it worked perfectly.. nice and tight
     
  6. ghaarnok

    ghaarnok What's a Dremel?

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    Thanks for all the suggestions so far.

    Well, i've just had my case open for a look.

    I tightened the screws as much as possible but after taking the HSF out I noticed that there is limited thread so it will not go any tighter.

    I also looked at the possibility of using a penny or nut to make it tighter but I don't think this will work with this HSF. The indent is in contact with the HSF so I can't place anything in the gap and placing anything in the gap next to it will just produce an uneven fitting.

    I'm a bit annoyed to be honest, I paid a decent amount of money for the cooler and it has a flaw such as this (of which I found no evidence in reviews). I doubt I can return it now so I'm gonna have to search for another one if it doesn't shape up to the job of overclocking.

    Anyone have any good suggestions for a decent HSF that will at least make a good contact with the CPU (that won't cost me the earth)?
     
  7. johnnyboy700

    johnnyboy700 Minimodder

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    The Artic Freezer Pro 7 is a pretty damn good option, cheap and very good. I've seen it get glowing reviews when compared to considerably more expensive models, usually its only behind the expensive models by a few percent in all categories.

    I've seen it on sale for about the £13 mark, postage will bump the price up to around the £20 mark. If you're lucky you might be able to pick one up at your local freindly neighbourhood PC shop, although they'll probably charge a bit more than the e-tailers and make the price difference negligible.
     
  8. b5k

    b5k What's a Dremel?

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    I've got a Freezer 7 Pro.

    Standard E6300 temps:
    Load: 61c.
    Idle: 41c.
    Ambient: 18c.

    Hmm...Haven't checked my temps in ages and it used to run at those temps when I was OCing it at 3Ghz, I think something has gone a bit funny, might re-apply some thermal paste...
     

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