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Hardware Linux CLI 101

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by CardJoe, 6 Sep 2007.

  1. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

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    but i already have the windows open
    and the commonly used trees are already expanded, its just 3 clicks, one to select the folder one to drag and one to select copy/move/shortcut if neccesary
    90% of my file management tasks are moving stuff from local incoming to fileserver
    its vastly easier to click one folder, right click + drag to the correct folder on the other explorer window (open side-by-side) and move it

    edit: also it drives me nuts not having a graphical representation of my whole folder structure
    i may know it inside out but i still dislike having no graphical version

    i got lost browsing my fileserver last time i had linux up and running, which was ridiculous :p
     
  2. completemadness

    completemadness New Member

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    you can use WinSCP to get a graphical view of a Linux file system on windows, and it just uses SSH

    Personally, i think both have merits, but its nice to have the option of the command line, something windows doesn't give you
     
  3. Glider

    Glider /dev/null

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    Code:
    pwd
    ;)
     
  4. Hamish

    Hamish New Member

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    not even close to being the same as having a graphical tree view of your folder structure :p

    edit:
    part of it might just be i really dislike the linux default directory structure
    i think for all windows' faults having all your system files in /windows and all your apps in subfolders of /program files and all your datafile collected together is much neater and much more logical than having all your config files for everything under /etc/ and having all your binaries under /bin and the like
    and i know there are technical reasons for it and i have gotten used to it, doesnt really bother me as much as it used to
    still cant help thinking its very unintuitive
     
  5. Glider

    Glider /dev/null

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    Actually it isn't... Your system is /, and under that you have all the things, sorted by category... Configs in 1 place (system wide ones), shared stuff, logs,... For instance /home, all the userdirs. The way it's under Linux you just need to mount a partition/device under /home and all the user data goes on a separate (safe) device. No 10 drives/partitions, that seem apart, but actually are all in the same system...

    Also from a multi-user, security stance, it's logical to have the things users can alter (/home) together, system settings (/etc) together, libraries (/usr/share) together...

    No need to allow users global writing privileges to mess up add on software (like it's needed mostly in Windows, to have a sort of usable system)

    But that's just my opinion

    EDIT
    Code:
    ls *
    gives some nice things too ;)
     
  6. statmonkey

    statmonkey New Member

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    Great guide, finding myself using my win box less and less. htop is fantastic a lot of this I had forgotten in my time away from Linux. The only problem I have now is playing around with Nomachine and getting Webmin so I can access from XP without the security issues. The bash tutorial was also excellent. Please keep these coming Glider. Also thanks for all your help when I have had "issues/brain farts"
     
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