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News Microsoft acquires Nokia's mobile arm

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Gareth Halfacree, 3 Sep 2013.

  1. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    There's 2 markets in smartphones high end which Nokia sales where never great.

    Low end where the dominant nexus 7 is pretty much a pick up and buy.

    Microsoft needs to target a segment and set out to compete in it. 15% by 2018 is laughable market would of changed again by then. 5 years the speed tech is developing that is near enough a lifetime.

    Xbox was successful due to 2 things Xbox online and price vs competition.
     
  2. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    They can't. At worst KDE will fork it and no one will ever remember the commercial Qt.
     
  3. Snips

    Snips I can do dat, giz a job

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    Again, there's no negatives on this deal, other than the anti-Microsoft brigade who just can't help commenting on Microsoft topics.

    Go and use a handset for more than the 5 minutes if at all you've used it for. It's better thought out and runs a hell of a lot smoother and quicker than the iPhone5 or S4 which I have used both extensively.
     
  4. Horizon

    Horizon Dremel Worthy

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    User reviews should be taken with a grain of salt firmly attached to a 80ft(~26m) pole because every schmuck, fanboi, person with uninformed opinion will post something even though they've had not actual first hand experience with the device nor ownership. There are even user reviews for never released products on pre-order if that says anything.
     
  5. schmidtbag

    schmidtbag New Member

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    I don't see how that will work out. You can't just simply fork something that had it's license changed because that means the forked code is now illegal due to it basically being a copy of the now non-*GPL predecessor. Isn't that similar to how Google got screwed over by Oracle due to Java?

    On the other hand, I don't think MS can just simply dump the LGPL off of Qt, so perhaps they would make a fork. Or, they might just leave it to rot, much like Oracle with Openoffice. Considering Razor-Qt, LXDE, KDE, and I think Enlightenment all depend on Qt, MS would kill off a lot of open source projects by dropping Qt support (though IMO, MS should really look into utilizing Qt - it's fantastic). But, as you said, Qt will probably still continue to live, maybe just with a different name (If this happens, I bet it'll be known as Kt)
     
  6. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Qt is fully LGPL. So anyone can fork it any day, he only limitation is that they can't call it Qt.

    So while Digia could decide not to release future versions of Qt under LGPL (good luck with that), nothing stops KDE or anyone else from taking the latest LGPL codebase and call it anything but Qt.

    And where did you get that info that Google got screwed over by Oracle due Java ?
    And that is what i am saying - if opensource community won't be satisfied with the development of the toolkit, they can fork with a different name.

    In reality i don't think they will leave Qt to "rot", as they got many paying customers, that is why Digia took over the paying customers of Qt from Nokia.
     
  7. ksyruz

    ksyruz New Member

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    Firstly the apps that most have to have is an Office, a music, a camera, an internet, and social app. Now if you go IOS or Android you have to pay £8.99 just for the Office app, which windows phone provides for free. The reasoning to not having enough apps on the windows market is just towards the games in their app store, which has has already came to have the top guys being fully published with the most played.


    This is a bit of a good and bad deal if you ask me, Microsoft needs to build a Tablet with 64-bit processing and full Windows operation, this would bring reasonong to go out and a MS tablet. Microsoft should now try and buy a share in AMD or buy them straight out. Then Microsoft and Nokia would be able to fight the big boys. For now they should thy to take over the lower end of the smartphone and phone market in the rest of the world. As Nokia seems to make the best value for specs compared to the Android boys
     
  8. 13eightyfour

    13eightyfour Formerly Titanium Angel

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    I switched to a low end Lumia 520 (incase I hated it) a couple of weeks ago. A couple of hours to familiarise myself with the OS and I can safely say its by far the most pleasant 'smartphone' I've used.

    I'll agree with the numerous comments of people dismissing the OS just because it's MS, unless you've used a handset your points are invalid imo.

    The Lumia 1020 may be the phone to tempt me back to a mainstream contract.
     
  9. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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  10. j_jay4

    j_jay4 Member

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    What's Nokia's last hurrah going to be? Lumia 1020? Before they are rebranded as Microsoft phones. I really hope they invent a new brand because, I don't think MicroSOFT is suitable.
     
  11. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    Mokia or how about Mickia, NokSoft MicroNok? :D
     
  12. RedFlames

    RedFlames ...is not a Belgian football team

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    They'll probably just be 'Microsoft Lumia' or even just 'Lumia'
     
    Last edited: 3 Sep 2013
  13. azrael-

    azrael- I'm special...

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    Nokia no longer has any real stake in Qt. The commercial side was sold off to Digia and the open source side is now maintained by the Qt Project.
     
  14. Nexxo

    Nexxo Queue Jumper

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    Just switched to a Lumia 920. It is absolute strawberry cheesecake.
     
  15. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

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    That's not how open source licences work. In fact, that's not how *any* licence works.

    Here's an thought experiment: I release CheesecakeOS under a permissive, open-source licence. I build up a decent user-base, and a few OEMs pick it up to run their devices. After hitting version 5.0, however, I decide I'm not making enough cash from it so I close the source. If licences worked like you're suggesting, in that a change to the licence in version 5.0 affected all prior versions, the OEMs would be retrospectively breaking the licence - and I could sue.

    That, naturally, is insane. Nobody would touch open source with a bargepole if that were the case. What actually happens is that the new licence affects only CheesecakeOS 5.0 onwards; all previous CheesecakeOS implementations are still GPL, and will always be GPL. Don't like the new licence? Fork CheesecakeOS 4.0 into CakecheeseOS and take over development yourself, releasing the result under the GPL. Do it right, and everyone abandons ship for your project over mine. (For a real-world example of this, see the OpenOffice.org fork LibreOffice which is now far more successful than its predecessor.)

    Licences like the GPL also carry with them some terms to prevent the source being closed: if a piece of software has been previously released under the GPL, it must always be made available under the GPL. I can release CheesecakeOS 5.0 under the Halfacree Restricted You-Owe-Me-All-The-Cash Licence 1.0 Unported if I want, but any code that it has inherited from CheesecakeOS 4.0 or older will need to be released under the GPL just the same.

    So, for this reason - plus, y'know, Microsoft not having bought anything to do with Qt, and Nokia not having much to do with the project itself these days - there's little to worry about.

    Ah, so the NYT did have its wires crossed: Microsoft gets the Nokia brand for low-end devices but not smartphones, and Nokia can't use it for a mobile device for 10 years - but that's not the same as Microsoft having a 10-year licence to the name, like the NYT claimed.
     
  16. rollo

    rollo Well-Known Member

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    Direct source from Nokia or NYT ill take the former every time NYT just makes up stuff as it pleases same as all newspapers.

    Microsoft need to learn how to launch a product in more than one country before we can discuss any plans they may have. Surface rt and surface pro launch showed how far behind the times they are with there North America launch first. Surface pro took 6 months to leave North America that's just crazy.

    Still wonder what made Nokia sell in the first place if they are so badly short of finance then all Microsoft has done is brought another money sink.

    Microsofts plans are not exactly earth shattering 15% by 2018 if the smartphone even exists by then in the way it does today.

    Also surprised Nokia effectively give up before blackberry.
     
  17. Corky42

    Corky42 Where's walle?

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    QFT :thumb:

    It surprises me a company such as Microsoft with its global influence, online services, IE, Skype, XBOX, and everything else that points to the online world being one marketplace/community, that they still release hardware on a regional basis.
     
  18. faugusztin

    faugusztin I *am* the guy with two left hands

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    Nokia didn't give up, they just changed orientation once again and decided not to play in mobile phone space anymore. Remember, they started as paper production plant :).
     
  19. GeorgeStorm

    GeorgeStorm Aggressive PC Builder

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    I'm going to remain hopeful, big fan of Windows Mobile OS, and I've heard nothing but good things about the nokia models :)
     
  20. jrs77

    jrs77 Well-Known Member

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    Most of the former Nokia-staff (devs and engineers) founded a new company called Jolla, which will release their first device by December running SailfishOS (MeeGo with the Davik-stuff finally implemented) to run all the Android-apps.

    The head-designer who now left Nokia will be joining Jolla aswell.

    Basically with the money all of these former Nokia-employees got out of this deal - they were still huge shareholders of Nokia - they can fund their new company to a greater extend.
     

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