News Microsoft reportedly killing off Windows 10 S

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by bit-tech, 5 Feb 2018.

  1. bit-tech

    bit-tech Supreme Overlord Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    12 Mar 2001
    Posts:
    731
    Likes Received:
    13
    Read more
     
  2. Paradigm Shifter

    Paradigm Shifter de nihilo nihil fit

    Joined:
    10 May 2006
    Posts:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    22
    Someone high up in Microsoft seems to have some sort of attention-span issue, because they keep pulling this trick. Less than a year is not enough time to see whether something will succeed or not when you're talking on the scale of a major multi-national corporation with millions of customers...

    Not that I'm sorry to see 10 S go down in a smoldering heap, but the whole Windows 10 product cycle seems to be revolving around driving every user insane with the constant flow of large-scale updates containing endless tweaks and "improvements".
     
  3. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    7,928
    Likes Received:
    127
    From what i gather all OEM system will come with Windows 10 S mode by default and it will be up to the customer if they want to upgrade, it's a win-win for Microsoft, the *reportedly 60% of customers will stick with Windows 10 in S mode and buy apps from the Windows store while the other 40% will be forced to setup a Microsoft account linked to their CC details so they can pay for the upgrade and then the chance of them later using the Microsoft store probably increases.

    *based on what Thurrot says.
     
  4. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,129
    Likes Received:
    58
    As far as I can tell, "Windows 10 S" and "Windows 10 S mode" are identical apart from the name. They probably should have just called it that in the first place rather than play silly pretend-to-be-fragmented games: Windows 10 s was never a separate OS from Windows 10, it was just Windows 10 with some extra policies applied.
     
  5. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    9,735
    Likes Received:
    433
    Doesn't that same logic apply to every version of Windows 10, though? They're all the same operating system, but with different features switched on or off accordingly.
     
  6. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,129
    Likes Received:
    58
    Kind of. 10 home/pro has larger differences like Bitlocker, ability to be part of a Domain, Hyper V, etc. Between Windows 10 S and the 'full' version all the gubbins are already present, just not user accessible.
    It'd be like setting windows to boot to XBMC instead of Explorer and declaring it a new OS: the OS is the same, you just can't see it by default.
     
  7. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    9,735
    Likes Received:
    433
    I'd say "the ability to run software not sourced from the Windows Store" is a bit of a bigger feature than "the ability to badly encrypt drives," but that might just be me!

    Microsoft never claimed Windows 10 was a whole new operating system, though - just a new edition (B2C) or SKU (B2B). It's no different to Home, or Pro, or Server - which are all Windows 10 under the hood.
     
  8. play_boy_2000

    play_boy_2000 It was funny when I was 12

    Joined:
    25 Mar 2004
    Posts:
    1,377
    Likes Received:
    32
    lol321.jpg Wow, Gareth, what'd you do to piss off Microsoft? :grin:

    Edit: Uh oh, now I'm in the crosshairs :lol:
     
    Gareth Halfacree likes this.
  9. Corky42

    Corky42 What did walle eat for breakfast?

    Joined:
    30 Oct 2012
    Posts:
    7,928
    Likes Received:
    127
    Wasn't there a workaround or something to enable running programs not from the Windows store on the old Windows 10 S?

    I wonder where people will stand legally if they workaround the restriction of Windows 10 S "mode" only running Windows store programs without paying the extra money to unlock that ability, i guess Microsoft won't like it but would it still be classed as piracy and illegal?
     
  10. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,129
    Likes Received:
    58
    The difference is that 'under the hood' Windows 10 S/S mode can run Win32 applications just fine. Under the hood, Home does not have the ability to run HyperV. Home -> Pro requires additional features to be added, while S -> Pro requires a function to be disabled to access features already in place.
     
  11. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    9,735
    Likes Received:
    433
    That's semantics: there's no functional difference between "additional functions to be added" and "a function being enabled." Either every version of Windows 10 is distinct by your terms or none of them are; I personally can see no reason for singling out 10 S. I could uninstall Bitlocker from Windows 10 Pro; it wouldn't mean I'd created a new operating system, nor would it mean I suddenly had Windows 10 Home instead. Likewise, Windows 10 Home does have the ability to join a domain under the hood, but it's artificially restricted by Microsoft so they can sell a more expensive version to business users.

    Surely we haven't all forgotten the days of "Add/Remove Windows Features" and having to stick Floppy #15 into the drive to enable TCP/IP?

    Windows 10 S is no more or less a "new operating system" than Windows 10 Home, Pro, or any other current version, as far as I can reckon.
     
    Last edited: 5 Feb 2018
  12. edzieba

    edzieba Virtual Realist

    Joined:
    14 Jan 2009
    Posts:
    2,129
    Likes Received:
    58
    It literally lacks the component, it;s not even there under the hood. As far as I am aware, nobody has 'unlocked' the ability to join Windows 10 to a domain, or even 'hacked in' the ability. That's why I'd class Windows 10 Home and Pro as different OSes, but Windows 10 S as merely an option within an OS.
    My point entirely. Merely not running some Win32 applications (Windows 10 S will still run packaged Win32 applications from the Windows Store, and allow built-in Win32 applications to run) does not make Windows 10 S a different OS.

    Home to Pro upgrade: Needs both the license key, AND to download the components that are literally missing from the install.
    Windows S to Pro: Flip a switch, do it offline, nothing extra needed.
     
  13. Gareth Halfacree

    Gareth Halfacree WIIGII! Staff Administrator Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    4 Dec 2007
    Posts:
    9,735
    Likes Received:
    433
    This is where we differ: I wouldn't class them as different operating systems (and neither does Microsoft.)
    You had to install from floppy components that were literally missing from the install to connect Windows 95 to a TCP/IP network; that didn't make Windows 95 with TCP/IP a different operating system to Windows 95.
     
Tags: Add Tags

Share This Page